News & Views Friday, April 28, 2017

Thanksgiving Piano 30 October, 2015

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recommended by Barb M., Keyboard and Folk Music Specialist

Cindy Berry is a well known name in piano arranging, especially for sacred piano music. “What Can I Play on Sunday, Book 6: November and December Services” includes music for Christ the King Sunday through Christmas service. The Thanksgiving medley has “Now Thank We All Our God” blended with “Come Ye Thankful People Come.”

Faye Lopez is an arranger with Soundforth through Lorenz. “Filled With Thankfulness” has ten pieces appropriate for Thanksgiving: “When Morning Guilds the Skies,” “Now Thank We All Our God,” and more. Both collections of sheet music for Thanksgiving are intermediate/late intermediate level. Try something new! Check out one (or both) of these collections!

For more information about these collections or other sacred/seasonal piano solo music, call us at 1-800-42-MUSIC, email us at keyboard@stantons.com, or check out our website, http://www.stantons.com.  Shop Stanton’s for all your sheet music needs!

About the Author:

Barb M. has worked in the Keyboard Department at Stanton’s since 1981. An active folk musician in the Columbus area, Barb also works with ensembles at her church and plays in the Columbus State Concert Band. In her spare time, Barb loves working with animals and computer games.


The Stanton’s Difference: Bring Your Students! 28 October, 2015

by Ken Tilger, Band Education Specialist –

It’s been a while since we’ve added to this series of posts, but we were recently reminded of one more way that Stanton’s is special. Besides making it a road trip to work with our knowledgeable staff, you can also bring your students!

studentsRecently the band director from Versailles High School made the trip to Stanton’s via school bus (comfy!) and brought about 20 of her band students along. While she was previewing OMEA required concert band titles, her students were busy choosing their own solo and ensemble selections from our vast selection. What a great use of time, and a unique experience for the students! Besides finding their solo or ensemble piece with some guidance from their teacher, they were also free to check out a whole host of method and etude books, pop play-alongs, and holiday collections that were on-hand, as well. Honestly, one of the most satisfying feelings I get from state professional (MEA) conferences is seeing the high school all-state musicians excitedly finding repertoire that they want, books they have been recommended, and music just to play with their friends. It’s the ultimate treasure hunt!

Truly budding musicians...

Coffee = Truly budding musicians

While a number of directors visit us on Saturdays or professional days throughout the school year, and some make a summer pilgrimage from nearby states, it is not unusual for us to see a school bus full of students pull into our parking lot about once or twice a year (don’t worry, we only cower briefly). After a quick “lay-of-the-land” tour, we are happy to turn them loose to shop, and they are welcome to take advantage of our first-hand instrumental knowledge, as well. We often hear from educators who have moved on to other states that they do not have a music supplier like Stanton’s even within driving distance, and many do not let customers freely browse all of their titles. Besides having directors take advantage of stopping by the store, what can be better than bringing aspiring musicians (and tomorrow’s teachers!) to musical Candy Land!?

About the Author:
Ken is a former band director, and has been with Stanton’s since 2004. He always feels the urge to read Edgar Allan Poe, the original novels featuring traditional Hollywood monsters, and other macabre tales this time of year, yet never does.


Meet the Stanton’s Team – Dan C. 26 October, 2015

We’ve written before on the Stanton’s blog about our knowledgeable staff. Now, we’d like to give you a chance to get to know our staff on a more personal level. Over the next several months, we will be having members of the Stanton’s team take our “30 Questions in 60 Seconds” questionnaire. We hope you will get to know the “real” us, and learn how we might better be of service to you!

Dan has worked at Stanton’s since 1979, primarily with orchestra music and print promotions. A “working” musician, he’s a classical cellist, a rock & jazz bassist and a folk & country guitarist/singer. His free time is spent with family or reading, gardening, cycling and working puzzles. His series of musical puzzles (RP3 Rebus Puzzle Picture People) can be found on the Stanton’s Facebook page each Sunday. He also has a reputation as a pretty good joke teller. Seriously. (Dan also takes the prize for the most verbose answers to our questionnaire!)

  1. What department do you work in at Stanton’s? – Instrumental Music
  2. What do you consider your specialties here? – String Instrumental Music, Orchestra Music, print promotions
  3. How long have you worked at Stanton’s? – as of August 2015 it’s (gasp!) 36 years
  4. What is your favorite task at Stanton’s? – Finding the best music to recommend to our customers
  5. What is your hometown? – I was born at the tender age of zero in Cleveland, and when I was one my family moved to the suburb of Parma, the largest suburb in the United States at the time I was growing up there. To give you an idea, my graduating class was 1026 students and we were one of three high schools.
  6. Where did you go to college? – I went to Otterbein College (now University) because I wanted to be a bigger fish in a smaller pond after my high school experience. I got a Bachelor of Music Education and following my heart, chose not to teach. At Stanton’s, I vicariously teach by recommending music that I feel will make teachers’ music program more successful, so I still rely on the skills I learned in college.
  7. What is your major instrument? – My college instrument was cello, which I still play, but I play electric bass about as much or more, as well as guitar and ukulele.
  8. Where or with whom do you currently perform/teach? – I play in an acoustic pop/country/jazz trio called The Cogs; we just finished our first CD. I also perform with The Sterling String Quartet, a couple of old time rock ‘n’ roll bands and I do lots of freelance gigs on cello and bass.
  9. What do you like to do in your spare time? – When I’m not working, gigging or rehearsing, I enjoy hanging out with extended family, reading, doing word or number puzzles, gardening and cycling.
  10. What days of the week can you be reached at Stanton’s? – Monday-Thursday & Saturday. I’m off on Friday, to accommodate weekend gigs.
  11. What is the last song/piece you listened to? – A funkified version of the old Lee Dorsey tune “Ya Ya” done by the Cajun band, L’Angelus.
  12. What is the last song/piece you played/sang? – I played and harmonized on a cover of Cool Change by The Little River Band at a gig with The Bill Foley Band.
  13. If you had a chance to perform with three musicians, living or dead, who would it be? – I’d perform with my acoustic trio, The Cogs. The three of us have the greatest chemistry of any group I’ve ever played in, classical or popular. Since we’d need one more person, let it be the late George Harrison of The Beatles. He is one of the most under-appreciated guitarists of rock and roll. His guitar solo on “Something,” the song he wrote that the Beatles performed, is absolutely perfect. Nothing needs to be added or taken away. That’s the kind of musician I like to partner with.
  14. What is your most memorable musical moment? – I can’t choose between seeing pianist Vladimir Horowitz a couple of years before he died, where his energy almost literally lit up the stage and the first time I heard the a cappella group The Kings Singers, who astounded me so thoroughly, I sat mesmerized after the concert until the hall was empty.
  15. If you could be instantly proficient on an additional instrument, what would you choose? – I’d choose the 5-string banjo since I inherited a real nice one from my father and haven’t spent much time with it yet, so I don’t play it very well, and I’d like to be able to do that.
  16. What is the most unusual performance you have ever been a part of? – My string quartet played a wedding on a slow moving train. Two of us faced the other two on parallel bench seats at the back of the railroad car while the bride and groom (both big train enthusiasts) walked up the aisle between us. While reading the music, we would occasionally look across the aisle at the other two players for cues and such and we would see the landscape moving past behind them. The railroad cars were also rocking back and forth as they rolled down the track. So there was always a sensation of movement, both physically and visually. We were all pretty green with motion sickness by the end of it, but it was a truly unusual, memorable experience.
  17.  What musical sound or noise do you love? – I’m a sucker for close a cappella vocal harmony of just about any genre – choral, doo-wop, barbershop and current groups like Pentatonix etc., as well as The King’s Singers, mentioned earlier.
  18. What musical sound or noise do you hate? – There is a rhythm in a particular tempo in some hip-hop music that is (perhaps intentionally) too close to my heartbeat because it really makes me physically uncomfortable even after a short amount of time and I’ve got to turn the music off.
  19. If you had your choice watching a great concert tonight or performing in a great concert tonight which would you choose and why? – I perform so much that it is very pleasurable to see and hear a great concert that I didn’t have to rehearse for or get nervous about – just enjoy. Listening to music well-played makes the heart smile.
  20. If heaven exists, when you arrive at the Pearly Gates, what heavenly ensemble would you like to be assigned to? – “If there’s a rock and roll heaven, well you know they’ve got a helluva band. (Righteous Brother’s Rock and Roll Heaven)” I’d choose that one.
  21. What profession other than your own would you like to attempt? – I would like to be a cartoonist or puzzle designer. I’ve already gotten started on that one – check out Stanton’s Facebook page on Sundays!
  22. What profession would you not like to do? – I wouldn’t want to be a politician and have to play the deceitful games that need to be played in order to be successful. Way too much unpleasant drama, full of conflict! I’m more of a co-operator and compromiser, which is not what politicians are these days.
  23. On a scale of 1-10, how funny do you think you are? – My answers so far may not reflect it, but I have a reputation as being a fairly funny guy. I was up for “class clown” as a high school senior and lost to someone I didn’t even know (my senior class was huge as mentioned above) but that didn’t deter me. I have fronted bands, which necessitated some “stand-up” schtick from time to time. I have quite an arsenal of jokes and know how to tell them, I do wacky voices, I draw cartoons, and spontaneous puns come pretty naturally to me. The trick is knowing when humor is appropriate or not. I often fall back on humor when a situation is uncomfortable, just to lighten things up, but it is sometimes not what is needed at the time. I’m trying to be more mindful of that. So I’d give myself a 9.7385 out of 10.
  24. Who was your first crush? – My first grade teacher left on maternity leave and her replacement was a beautiful young woman (at least I thought so at age 6!) who was fresh out of college and with whom I was quite smitten. I don’t even remember her name, since it was a long time ago! I think she got married toward the end of the year and I was crushed, hoping that she would have waited for me to grow up!
  25. Is there anything you wish would come back into fashion? – Certainly not faux-hawks or goatees, but how about those huge bell bottom pants (we called them elephant bells) from back in the 70s? I always thought they were cool.
  26. Do you love or hate roller coasters? – I liked them as a young man, but now they just make me sore from being thrown around so much, so I don’t ride them anymore. It takes too long to recover!
  27. If you were a super hero, what powers would you have? – I think it would be fun to have the ability to become invisible. Either that or the ability to time travel without affecting the past or the future – just observe it, which maybe goes along with invisibility!
  28. How many pairs of shoes do you own? – When I started adding them up I was kind of surprised. I’ve got 3 pair for gigging (tax write-offs! – a dressy pair, a casual pair, and a goofy pair), 3 pairs of sneakers – a black pair, a white pair and a beat up pair for yard work, 2 pair of sandals, 2 pair of flip flops, 3 pair of dress shoes, 2 pair of work boots – so 15 in all!
  29. Would you rather win the lottery or work at the perfect job? – I’ve had a great job for 36 years (see question #3) so I’ll take the lottery. That would free me up for other pursuits and allow my wife to quit working if she wanted to, plus we could help out our children financially.
  30. If you had to eat one meal for the rest of your life, what would it be? – My wife’s meatloaf, a baked sweet potato, succotash, homemade applesauce and my wife’s strawberry-rhubarb pie for dessert. (Burp. – ‘scuse me)

Kid’s Korner for Fall and Christmas 2015 23 October, 2015

by Judy Henry & Jennifer Fry, Sacred Choral Specialists

Involve your youngest singers in worship this fall and Christmas with one of these great anthems for children’s choirs!

Let Us Give Thanks to the Lord arr. Brad Nix
Joy and energy abound in this irresistible thanksgiving anthem that includes a brief portion of the hymn, “For the Beauty of the Earth.” Repetition in both text and melody make the piece a snap to learn. And an easy, optional descant gives budding two-part choirs a chance to shine as the anthem comes to a close.

There Is No One Like Jesus (Hakuna Mungu Kama Wewe) arr. Joseph Martin
Upbeat and lively, this spirited acclamation of praise is pure joy. Driven forward by a syncopated theme, this is music for the soul. Lots of repetition encourages quick learning, and the optional percussion really provides for a unique listening and performance experience. Available in two convenient voicings, this is one of those rare pieces that’s equally successful for adults and younger voices. A winner!

An Invitation for Advent arr. Douglas Nolan
Beckoning for Emmanuel to “come and set us free,” this anthem for Advent combines original music and text with the beloved Advent hymn, “O Come, O Come Emmanuel.” Optional egg shakers and a stirring piano accompaniment enhance the sense of longing with its gentle, but continuous rhythmic drive.

Christmas Songs of Joy arr. Joseph Martin
This anthem of Christmas celebration combines original text and music with snippets of three beloved carols: Angels We Have Heard on High, The First Noel, and Joy to the World. Filled with exuberance and joy, the piece is an excellent choice for use on Christmas Eve or anytime during the Christmas season.

Hear the Angels, Hear Them Sing by Vicki Bedford
The late J. Paul Williams gave us so many wonderful lyrics for children’s choirs and here is a Christmas one that is brand new. Vicki Bedford has fashioned a catchy melody with rhythm and verve, and let the two vocal parts echo and play. Smuggling in the chorus to “Angels We Have Heard on High” was a stroke of genius. Children’s choirs will eat this one up! From the Houston Children’s Choir Series.

Mary Rocking, Gently Rocking arr. Hal Hopson
This sweet Christmas lullaby is artfully set by Hal Hopson. With short phrasing to support the rocking movement, this piece is a great way to teach your choristers about breath control and the shaping of phrases. The optional second part is not difficult, making this a good choice for choirs ready to begin part-singing. Also includes an optional flute part.

The Inn Crowd by Lee & Susan Dengler
The infamous census of the ages has made Bethlehem a busy and crowded spot, and there are some guests at a local inn who aren’t very happy. F.W. Woolworth (rich wool salesman), Rock Starling (hip star singer) – among others – have made it clear they want no part of the “lower class” staying at the inn (or otherwise). By the end of this 20-minute, easy-to-prepare and present musical, everyone learns that Jesus came for everyone, and that because of Him, we’re all definitely in God’s Kingdom.

For more suggestions for your children’s choir, please contact us!

About the Authors:
Judy Henry has been working in Stanton’s Choral Department since 1975.  She holds a Bachelor’s degree in Music Education from Bowling Green State University, and a Master’s degree in Choral Conducting from The Ohio State University. A member of the Grove City Chamber Singers, Judy also enjoys reading and spending time with her four grandchildren.

Jennifer Fry is a graduate of Otterbein College with a degree in Vocal Performance. She has worked at Stanton’s for over 14 years specializing in Sacred Choral, Classical Vocal and Handbell music. Jennifer is a soprano section leader in the Chancel Choir at First Community Church in Columbus Ohio, and is also the founder, Artistic Director and bass bell ringer for Handbells Columbus.


Christmas Pops! 21 October, 2015

by Jen Sper, School Choral Specialist

Bring some fun to your holiday concerts with these great pop arrangements for choir – your audience will love it!

Santa, Bring My Baby Back (To Me) arr. Ryan O’Connell
Put some “Elvis” into your concert with this hit from 1957. Complete with combo parts and voiced for mixed, women and male choirs, this arrangement rocks the stage and makes a great novelty number with movement, costumes and staging, too.

Here We Come A-Caroling arr. Kirby Shaw
This Calypso style arrangement is set in a joyful a cappella voicing that will be a total blast to rehearse and perform. A great addition to holiday concerts, caroling and community performances!

Three Jazzy Bell Carols arr. Jay Rouse
Now in a NEW SSAA voicing, this bestselling choral of three, short a cappella jazz arrangements is a fabulous find for the holidays. “Ding Dong Merrily On High,” “Jingle Bells” and “Carol of the Bells” have been creatively arranged in tempo and style forming a wonderful collection of harmonies and rhythm for your holiday concert.

This Christmas arr. Paul Langford
What a modern holiday standard this song has become and covered by a wide range of artists! This chart-topping hit is set with a steady, a cappella vocal groove worthy of any jazz choir or ensemble. A familiar tune with a fresh new sound for your holiday concert.

For more holiday concert suggestions, visit the Stanton’s Staff Selections portion of our website!

About the Author:
Jen Sper has been with Stanton’s since 2006. A former middle school and high school choral director, she holds a Bachelor of Music Education degree from Baldwin Wallace College Conservatory of Music. An active choral singer and accompanist throughout the Central Ohio area, she also enjoys good food, running (to counteract the good food…) and the Muppets.


Piano Duets for Christmas 19 October, 2015

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recommended by Barb M., Keyboard and Folk Music Specialist

Go, Tell It On the Mountain” is a collection of distinctive piano duet arrangements for Advent and Christmas. A blend of Christmas songs includes a spiritual, “Go, Tell It On the Mountain,” the German carol “Lo, How a Rose E’er Blooming,” and the British Isles’ “The Holly and the Ivy.” They have been arranged for two advanced pianists by Victor Labenske. The duets are fun to play, and delightful to hear. Get started now for the Christmas season!

For more information about this collection of Christmas sheet music, call us at 1-800-42-MUSIC, email us at keyboard@stantons.com, or visit our website, http://www.stantons.com. Shop Stanton’s for all your sheet music needs!

About the Author:

Barb M. has worked in the Keyboard Department at Stanton’s since 1981. An active folk musician in the Columbus area, Barb also works with ensembles at her church and plays in the Columbus State Concert Band. In her spare time, Barb loves working with animals and computer games.

 


A Merry Medieval Christmas 16 October, 2015

by Jen Sper, School Choral Specialist

Is it the poetry? The dance-like quality? The hand drum, or the finger cymbals? There’s just something about all of these qualities combined that make Medieval and Renaissance music feel particularly special on a holiday or winter concert. Here are a few suggestions for upcoming concerts, for both high school and middle school choirs:

Gaudete! arr.Michael Engelhardt
From Piae Cantiones (1582), this SATB setting of “Gaudete!” is in a progressive style well-suited to the medieval melody. Its energy is derived from the accented rhythms and dance-like percussive elements – all adding to the joyous nature of this piece.

Veni, Veni Emmanuel arr. Michael John Trotta
Trotta conceived this well-known Latin text as a dialogue between supplicants and the Creator, a combination of old and new. He masterfully juxtaposes a personal longing for something still to come with the steadfast assurance of something ever-present, yet not always seen. While the original theme is associated with the Christmas season, the wider theme of longing for something greater is universal to the human condition and allows this piece to be programmed throughout the year. A fitting piece for any concert, contest or festival.

Sing We with Gladness Antony Holborne/arr. Audrey Snyder
Based on a Galliard by the Elizabethan composer Antony Holborne, this adaptation for voices includes a festive text that will be ideal for madrigal dinners, concerts and holiday programs.

Je Ne Fus Jamais Si Aise Pierre Certon/arr. Jerry Estes
Pierre Certon’s dancing and lighthearted work is made more accessible for younger voices with this fine arrangement. The harmonic and textural elements remain true to the original, preserving the frivolity of the piece. You may choose to sing only the French and end at the optional fine, or extend the length and continue singing using an English text. Add the flute and percussion parts to create the perfect performance.

Lirum, Lirum Thomas Morley/arr. Patrick M. Liebergen
From Morley’s “The First Booke of Balletts to Five Voyces,” the original five-part version is featured here as an arrangement for three-part mixed voices with an optional baritone part. Modernized words new dynamic indications and optional keyboard and hand drum parts provided by renowned arranger Patrick Liebergen are also included. Quintessential Morley – this must-sing madrigal is well-suited for ensembles of all sizes, and is a must for festival or contest.

White is in the Winter Night arr. Audrey Snyder
From the “And Winter Came” album, Enya brings her unique musical and lyric ability in this appealing winter soundscape! Evoking a quasi-Renaissance dance feel, this will make a wonderful opening number or processional for a holiday or winter program.

For more suggestions, visit the Stanton’s Staff Selections portion of our website!

About the Author:
Jen Sper has been with Stanton’s since 2006. A former middle school and high school choral director, she holds a Bachelor of Music Education degree from Baldwin Wallace College Conservatory of Music. An active choral singer and accompanist throughout the Central Ohio area, she also enjoys good food, running (to counteract the good food…) and the Muppets.

 


Handbell Music for Fall and Christmas 2015 14 October, 2015

by Jennifer Fry, Handbell Specialist

FOR GENERAL WORSHIP
Rejoice, Ye Pure in Heart arr. Margaret R. Tucker
After a short, fanfare introduction, “Rejoice, Ye Pure in Heart” presents the hymn tune MARION in three settings: 1. traditional 4/4 hymn form, 2. a more meditative setting in 3/4 time, with the melody in mid range, played by optional handchimes, and 3. a stately setting in 4/4 time with a flowing bass bells accompaniment. The first setting of the hymn tune could also be used, with or without treble instrument, to accompany congregational singing of this hymn. The two editions are written so they may be played together in festivals and other multiple bell choir situations.

Ring Out for Fall ed. Michael Helman
This outstanding collection offers spectacular seasonal selections that teach many handbell techniques, including LV, martellato, martellato lifts, shakes, and echo, as well as instructions for handchime choir adaptation. Your beginning ensemble will appreciate and enjoy this resource year-round!

Father Most Holy arr. Terry Osman
Terry Osman composed this fabulous arrangement of the well-known tune that will bring to mind each of the many texts with which the tune is often associated. Flowing neatly through the ensemble, this piece can be learned by young ringers in only a few rehearsals.

My Faith Looks Up to Thee arr. Michael R. Keller
From peaceful beginnings, this arrangement of the tune OLIVET gains strength and energy through a lightly-arpeggiated middle verse and on into a glorious whirlwind of a final verse. With minimal bell changes, ringers can focus on their musicality, which will be challenged with contrasting styles and moods. An excellent choice for use throughout the church year, by ensembles of almost any level.

I Love Thee arr. Tammy Waldrop
Captivate your audience with Tammy Waldrop’s stunning arrangement of the beloved tune. Full of devotion, this selection is easy to prepare due to bell changes only occurring at the key change.

Be Still, My Soul arr. Lloyd Larson
This graceful arrangement of two well-known hymns will find a place in church services and concerts throughout the year. A fanfare-like opening leads into a grand statement of the FINLANDIA tune, which gives way to a thin and delicate verse of “It Is Well with My Soul” before returning for a triumphant chordal ending with the original tune. The optional cello provides a beautiful contrasting sonority to the bells.

FOR ADVENT & CHRISTMAS
Angel Medley arr. Terry Osman
Terry Osman weaves together three favorite Christmas tunes: “Angels from the Realms of Glory,” “Angels We Have Heard on High,” and “Hark! The Herald Angels Sing” in this charming arrangement. It is perfect for any occasion during the Christmas season.

I Wonder as I Wander arr. Peggy Bettcher
The ethereal sound of singing bells opens this 3-5 octave arrangement which combines two haunting Christmas melodies, the Appalachian folk tune “I Wonder as I Wander” and “Coventry Carol.” These two carols are artistically woven together to create a beautiful, contemplative composition, making this a poignant addition to any Christmas service or program.

Now Proclaim Messiah’s Birth arr. Linda R. Lamb
This joyful arrangement of the tune REGENT SQUARE will be a welcome addition to your Christmas repertoire. A rhythmic, malleted opening verse gives way to a gentler, almost fantasia-like verse in 3/4 time, before returning once more to the familiar 4/4 time. A snippet of “Angels We Have Heard on High” provides a moment of melodic contrast before the triumphant finish. A fun piece both to ring and hear!

Masters in This Hall arr. Jason W. Krug
Immense energy and a quick tempo ensure that this delightful piece will be a memorable addition to your holiday performances. A great selection for beginning ringers, it is free of bell changes and includes opportunities to use thumb damp techniques.

Shepherds Jubilee arr. Michael Helman
From the collection “Let Our Carols Fill the Sky” (20/1588L), this creative medley incorporates four traditional carols and is perfect for use throughout the holiday season. Various stopped techniques, as well as the optional chimes add variety for the listener and ringing enjoyment for your choir.

Puer Nobis arr. Patricia Hurlbutt
Patricia Hurlbutt’s arrangement of the tune PUER NOBIS is a light, playful selection sure to entrance ringers and audiences alike. With no bell changes and limited techniques, most ensembles can prepare this piece with minimal rehearsal time. Suggested hymn titles for the piece allow it to be played for Easter, Christmas, or at any point throughout the church year.

For more great recommendations, contact us at 1.800.426.8742. Shop Stanton’s for all your sheet music needs!

About the Author:
Jennifer Fry is a graduate of Otterbein College with a degree in Vocal Performance. She has worked at Stanton’s since 2001 specializing in Sacred Choral, Classical Vocal and Handbell music. Jennifer is a soprano section leader in the Chancel Choir at First Community Church in Columbus Ohio, and is also the founder, Artistic Director, and bass bell ringer for Handbells Columbus.


Classical Guitar for Christmas 13 October, 2015

recommended by Barb M., Keyboard and Folk Music Specialist

Classical Guitar, Christmas Sheet Music00146974”  is a recent release. There are thirty holiday favorites arranged for solo classical guitar arranged by John Hill in standard notation. These Christmas favorites are at a late elementary/early intermediate level. They could be played in any setting: church, recital, nursing home, or any other setting you could think of. There is plenty of good material in this collection of sheet music for Christmas. It can be used every Christmas for years. Check it out!

For more information about this collection or other Christmas collections for guitar, call us at 1-800-42-MUSIC, email us at keyboard@stantons.com, or visit our website, http://www.stantons.com. Shop Stanton’s for all your sheet music needs!

About the Author:

Barb M. has worked in the Keyboard Department at Stanton’s since 1981. An active folk musician in the Columbus area, Barb also works with ensembles at her church and plays in the Columbus State Concert Band. In her spare time, Barb loves working with animals and computer games.


STANTON’S SPOTLIGHT: Let the Bells Ring! 12 October, 2015

by Ken Tilger, Band Education Specialist –

Tired…Overused…Again?
Words we’ve used in previewing countless yearly arrangements of the Ukrainian Bell Carol (including medleys) resulting in our secret wish for a temporary moratorium on its use.

Bold…Explosive…Tour-de-Force!
Words that describe our excitement and enthusiasm upon hearing Robert Buckley’s Let the Bells Ring! (based on the Ukrainian Bell Carol) that made it a guaranteed Stanton’s Staff Selection at first listen. It is proof that no matter how overused a piece of music is, the right amount of musical originality can perk the ears up with excitement and rekindle joy in the original.

A wonderful mix of original ideas combined with the traditional work, Let the Bells Ring is a rhapsodic fantasy that includes tips of the hat to the Canadian Brass (use of a shortened phrase), Tran-Siberian Orchestra (explosive energy), and Mannheim Steamroller (Latin/pop style), all wrapped up in an orchestration that features EVERY section of the ensemble. With woodwind flourishes and bombastic full brass statements, Buckley makes great use of playing both family and sectional timbres off each other. Melodic statements, technical passages, and countermotion fly from section to section throughout the band, horns and low brass included! Bell tone punctuations in the winds and a mix of even, triplet, and multi-beat rhythms and syncopation add plenty of excitement and variety. You truly need horses in every section and sufficient rehearsal time to pull this one together! Compositionally it is perfect – recognizable and true to the original yet with enough variation of style and concept to make it interesting. Let the Bells Ring! is perfect as an attention-getting concert opener (you may need to play through another full piece before your concert to be sufficiently warmed-up) or climactic closer (be sure there’s enough gas left in the tank!), advanced bands will have a blast performing it. It may well be the last version of Ukrainian Bell Carol you ever need to add to your library, and one that we cannot recommend more!

Stanton’s Also Recommends –
by Robert Buckley: Codebreaker, Fantasy on the Huron Carol, Iditarod, Smoke and Mirrors
New for Christmas: And All the Bells on Earth Shall Ring, And Heaven and Nature Ring!, A Festive Holiday Greeting, Oh, What Fun

About the Author:
Ken is a former band director, and has been with Stanton’s since 2004. He always feels the urge to read Edgar Allan Poe, the original novels featuring traditional Hollywood monsters, and other macabre tales this time of year, yet never does.


Guitar Trios for Christmas 09 October, 2015

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recommended by Barb M., Keyboard and Folk Music Specialist

If you have several guitar students, or several mid-later elementary guitar players  at church, school, or studio, this book of sheet music for Christmas, “Christmas Classics” is a great collection to get 3 of your players together to play background music at a dinner, or for a recital. The 15 songs include two secular tunes, “Jingle Bells” and “Deck the Halls.” Chord symbols are provided, so a fourth guitar may be added for a rhythm part. Each song includes the melody part, a harmony part, and  a bass line. There are other collections of songs for guitar trio in the “Essential Elements Guitar Ensembles” line, too. For more information about this collection or other similar options, call us at 1-800-42-MUSIC, email us at keyboard@stantons.com, or check our website, http://www.stantons.com. Shop Stanton’s for all your sheet music needs!

About the Author:

Barb M. has worked in the Keyboard Department at Stanton’s since 1981. An active folk musician in the Columbus area, Barb also works with ensembles at her church and plays in the Columbus State Concert Band. In her spare time, Barb loves working with animals and computer games.

 


STANTON’S SPOTLIGHT: Truly Brave 07 October, 2015

truly brave

recommended by Rachel Steele and Jen Sper, School Choral Specialists

If you haven’t read our post about how we pick choral promotions, you might not know that Jen and I spend hours and hours listening to new choral music each year. The publisher with the largest number of new issues is Hal Leonard, with 230 new pieces this year. As you can imagine, it’s quite daunting to start on this bin full of music, which is often still in manuscript form. The pieces are sent in alphabetical order, so by the time we got to “Truly Brave,” we were feeling more than a little jaded.

Even so, about 2 pages into this song, both of us were crying. Yes, it really is that good. Inspired by patients fighting childhood cancer, Hoda Kotb of “The Today Show” brought together Sara Bareilles and Cyndi Lauper to create this mashup of “Brave” and “True Colors.” I’m not generally a fan of mash-ups, but these two songs fit together so effortlessly that it never feels forced or jerky. It doesn’t hurt that both songs are also great in their own right. If you only find room for one pop selection in your program this year, it should be “Truly Brave“!

Looking for an even more meaningful experience for your students?  You could try…

  • Doing this with combined choirs. It’s available in SATB, 3-Part Mixed and 2 Part, so you could teach it to your groups of all levels and put them together. No room for all those kids on the stage? No problem – spread them out around the auditorium for a surround sound experience!
  • Dedicating this piece to a particular student (or students) in your program or school that is/are fighting their own battle, be it with cancer or anything else. Allow your students to make the personal connection and you’ll create a moment they won’t forget.
  • Asking your students for input about what they think it means to be “Truly Brave.” They could give you letters, essays, pictures or anything that you can use to create a slide show. Project this during the concert, and you won’t have a dry eye in the house!

About the Authors:

Rachel Steele has been working in the choral department at Stanton’s since 2013. She previously taught middle school and high school band and choir for 13 years, and holds a bachelor’s and a master’s degree in music education from The Ohio State University. Currently a member of the Heisey Wind Ensemble and a musician at Epiphany Lutheran Church (Pickerington, OH) Rachel also enjoys reading, sewing, baking and the Pittsburgh Steelers!

A former middle school and high school choral director, Jen Sper holds a Bachelor of Music Education degree from Baldwin Wallace College Conservatory of Music. An active choral singer and accompanist throughout the Central Ohio area, she also enjoys good food, running (to counteract the good food…) and the Muppets.


FREE Holiday Choral Reading Session! 05 October, 2015

Pandora-Christmas-Music-StationsNow that you’ve been working with your ensembles for a few weeks and know the strengths of your particular students, you are probably ready to program your Holiday concert. Let Stanton’s Sheet Music help!

*FREE*
HOLIDAY CHORAL READING SESSION
Saturday, October 10, 2015
10:00-11:30 a.m.

We will read new titles in all voicings for winter concerts. Even if you attended our choral reading sessions this summer, we still encourage you to join us for this Holiday session, as we will be including many titles that have not been read on any previous Stanton’s sessions!

Because we will be reading music directly from our large inventory and sharing the expertise of the Stanton’s School Choral staff, we are able to offer this reading session at no cost to you! (There is no complimentary packet, but you may purchase singles or quantities on any titles that you like.)

For more information, please contact us at 1.800.426.8742 ext. 1 or email us.


Meet the Stanton’s Team – Karen S. 02 October, 2015

We’ve written before on the Stanton’s blog about our knowledgeable staff. Now, we’d like to give you a chance to get to know our staff on a more personal level. Over the next several months, we will be having members of the Stanton’s team take our “30 Questions in 60 Seconds” questionnaire. We hope you will get to know the “real” us, and learn how we might better be of service to you!

karen sKaren S. is one of our longest serving employees here at Stanton’s, having been with the company for over four decades. Karen has the distinction of being one of the only non-musicians on the staff here, so we hope you enjoy her unique perspective! We’ve given Karen a break on some of those musician questions, so her 30 questions comes in at a slim 19!

  1. What department do you work in at Stanton’s? – Accounting
  2. What do you consider your specialties here? – Being here so long that I can help fix anything for a customer
  3. How long have you worked at Stanton’s? – 45 Years
  4. What is your favorite task at Stanton’s? – Trying to figure out a problem on an account
  5. What is your hometown? – West Jefferson, OH
  6. Where did you go to college? – Columbus Business University
  7. What is your major instrument? – The radio!
  8. What do you like to do in your spare time? – Relax and watch TV
  9. What days of the week can you be reached at Stanton’s? – Monday – Friday
  10. What is your most memorable musical moment? – I got to go to the Rolling Stones concert!!!
  11.  What musical sound or noise do you love? – Country and R&B
  12. What musical sound or noise do you hate? – Jazz
  13. On a scale of 1-10, how funny do you think you are? – 3
  14. Who was your first crush? – Roger Lynch (Played in the Metros in High School)
  15. Do you love or hate roller coasters? – Hate!
  16. If you were a super hero, what powers would you have? – Magic
  17. How many pairs of shoes do you own? – 30
  18. Would you rather win the lottery or work at the perfect job? – Win the lottery. (Then I could volunteer at a perfect job and work when I wanted to.)
  19. If you had to eat one meal for the rest of your life, what would it be? – Chicken and noodles