News & Views Wednesday, January 28, 2015

Category: New Publications

FREE READING SESSION: In One Month! 28 January, 2015

spring-piano-music-269x300It’s been a long time since those reading sessions at the end of last summer…come refresh your memory with our recommended choral music for finishing out the school year!

FREE
SPRING CHORAL READING SESSION
Saturday, February 28 from 10:00-11:30

James E. Strouse Workshop Hall
Stanton’s Sheet Music
330 S. Fourth Street
Columbus OH 43215

We will read selected titles for SATB, men’s and women’s ensembles appropriate for high school spring concerts and graduation. Because we will be reading music directly from our large inventory and sharing the expertise of the Stanton’s School Choral staff, Jen Sper, Rachel Steele and Joyce Stonebraker, we are able to offer this reading session at no cost to you!

For more information, email us or call 1.800.426.8742 ext. 1.


Be Brave: Teach Style to Your Middle School Band 23 January, 2015

by Ken Tilger, Band Education Specialist –

GenresTeaching solid fundamentals of playing and basic musicianship are at the core of beginning and middle school band. Obviously there is already plenty to cover within your curriculum, and if your school district’s program is well-organized, there is a certain skill set and level of musicianship your students should reach before moving on to high school band. Throw in programming for a Christmas/winter concert and adjudicated performance/band trip, and your year is already really full. While all of these things are worthwhile, why not step outside the box a little bit and throw in a piece to teach style.

While I know there are reasons both musical and practical not to do this, there are a number of great reasons to do it, as well. First, it will provide some interesting variety to your concert programming. In addition to the usual concert overture/concert piece, lyrical selection, march, and programmatic piece, an authentic Latin or other “world” style, tango, waltz, or show-style piece will add some fun, flair, and may well be the highlight of your performance. Secondly, it will greatly enhance your group’s musicianship. Different styles place different reading and interpretation demands on players, and the more styles a musician encounters, the more versatile they become. As a big band saxophonist that came up through braveschool music programs, I feel like we all learn to play legato really well. This is great for developing tone and for classical playing and study, but limits our scope for interpreting notation. On most gigs, styles change from one tune to the next and most students really only encounter a variety of styles through jazz ensemble. Of course this is limited to those who participate, and if the programming is really solid. It’s never too early to plant seeds of versatility, and your overall program will greatly benefit from the variety of skills and depth of understanding your students gain. Lastly, exposure to a variety of styles will broaden your students’ view of music overall and its place in history.

Below I have featured two of my favorite new pieces to teach style. Keep in mind that if they are cheesy, not authentic, or merely dressed up with percussion toys, they don’t make the cut. As when choosing pieces for jazz band, I recommend selecting a piece that’s about 1 grade level easier than your ensemble typically plays. This will allow your students to easily nail down notes and rhythms so you can focus on interpretation, articulation, and nuance. I have also listed a few more new titles for middle school band that capture their respective styles perfectly. We even think enough of them that they’re all in our middle school band promotion!  If you’re considering teaching style this year, these are all great starting places. Go ahead. Be brave. Your students and audience will thank you.

Camino del Sol by Steve Hodges        Grade 2.5
Camino del Sol is a solid, fun to play Latin selection that will greatly develop your ensemble’s technique, rhythmic interpretation, and cut-time reading. Underpinned by a characteristic, syncopated bass ostinato and Latin percussion, a light melody passes throughout the band complete with full-bar, 8th note pick-ups and hits in all the right places. As always, articulation, note length (space!), and interpreting figures sets the style. The biggest challenges will be learning to hear & feel the figures in 2 (don’t over-count), and keeping the slurred melody from being too legato.

Zombie Tango by James Meredith      Grade 2
Teach beyond notes and rhythms with this fantastic tango. Sure it’s spooky per the title, but more important is its authenticity – bringing any cultural or dance style to life requires appropriate accents, note lengths, and interpretation of figures. More than just dressing it up with percussion instruments, Zombie Tango features characteristic elements in spades (including a bridge)! Aside from being a fun programming change-up, learning to interpret this style from the page will work wonders for reading articulation and rhythmic figures. We couldn’t recommend this piece more!

Stanton’s also recommends: African Alleluia, Klezmer Clarinets, and Three Brazilian Folksongs

About the Author:
Ken is a former band director, and has been with Stanton’s since 2004. He is excited to have finally seen Jeff Coffin and the Mu’tet live! He also enjoys comic books, all things Pittsburgh (Let’s Go Pens!), and plays saxophone with Swing’s the Thing Big Band.


Suggestions for Choral Adjudications 2015 22 January, 2015

by Jen Sper, School Choral Specialist

The beginning of 2015 is a perfect opportunity to look back at what your students have learned so far this school year, and to look forward to the new and exciting musical challenges you will present to them in the coming months. As you prepare for your upcoming concerts, festivals or adjudicated events, we recommend these repertoire choices, carefully chosen from many new and classic publications as “the best of the best!”

for SATB Ensembles
Red River Valley arr. Jeffrey Douma
This arrangement of the beloved folk song was first premiered by the Yale Glee Club in the fall of 2006, and has since become an audience favorite. Probably referring to the Red River that flows north between Minnesota and North Dakota into Lake Winnipeg, the sentiment expressed by the text is immediately understood by anyone who has had to bid farewell too soon to a loved one.

Ecce Sacerdos Magnus by J.M. Haydn/ed. Martin Banner
Johann Michael Haydn was a prolific composer who wrote hundreds of compositions including a Requiem. The text lends itself for use at ordination or a festival liturgy. Scored for mixed chorus with 2 horns and strings, the work is also easily accompanied by keyboard.

Now Sleeps the Crimson Petal by Greg Gilpin
Greg Gilpin’s setting of Alfred Lord Tennyson’s time-honored text is a musical example of text painting set to lush harmonic phrases and lyric melodies. The simple yet supportive accompaniment allows the vocals to be showcased throughout. A concert or festival winner.

Didn’t My Lord Deliver Daniel arr. Roger Emerson
Now available in a flexible SATB voicing, this driving rock spiritual features a subdued opening that explodes into high-powered energy sure to be a hit with your developing mixed choirs in middle and high school.

for Women’s Ensembles
La Maumariee (J’entends le loup) arr. Joni Jensen
An incredibly dynamic adaptation of this beloved French folk song. Quick and rhythmic, the work reflects the determination and liveliness of the girl in the poem who won’t let others dictate her love or her future. Meter changes, body percussion and the dancing oboe and piano parts all work together in this challenging arrangement. Sure to be a favorite of choirs and audiences alike! With piano, oboe, opt. frame drum and body percussion.

Kyrie (from Mass in B-flat Major #10) by W.A. Mozart/arr. Arkadi Serper
From the Mozart Missa Brevis K.275, this delightful work has been adapted for treble voices. An excellent introduction to Classical era style and performance practice!

Samiotissa arr. Serper/Serper
Explore the music of Greece with this traditional folksong that tells the story of a boy who loves a girl from the island of Samos. In 7/8 meter, the choral parts are accessible and it’s easy to add Greek folk dance steps to create an authentic experience. Includes pronunciation guide.

Now My Heart by Jacques Arcadelt/arr. Patrick M. Liebergen
Arcadelt’s French chanson, transcribed into English, was originally written for SAT voices. “Now My Heart” is an excellent example of Arcadelt’s tendency to set chanson in chordal style with simultaneous pronunciation of the text by all voices. The use of optional percussion will only add to the Renaissance experience, and is sure to be a concert or festival crowd-pleaser.

for Men’s Ensembles
Flanders Fields by Paul A. Aitken
This distinguished setting of the McCrae text was originally published for mixed choirs soon after being named the first winner of the ACDA Brock Memorial composition contest. Aitken’s new women’s and men’s voicings are just as inspiring as the original.

Praise the Lord by Stephen M. Hopkins
Hopkins’ highly spirited and rhythmic adaptation of Psalms 148 & 150 masterfully imbeds the hymn tune Lobe den Herren before a unison “Praise to the Lord.” Majestic at times, this piece offers a plethora of musical moments for men’s choirs.

Loch Lomond arr. Russell Robinson
One of the most well-known of all Scottish folk songs, Robinson’s arrangement of “Loch Lomond” captures the flavor of the Gaelic language – Scottish sounds and textures in both male voices and piano accompaniment. Sensitive, accessible and just plain pretty, it is sure to be a favorite of any concert or festival program.

Click here for all of our suggestions for select pieces for adjudicated events – while we have specifically geared these selections to be appropriate for Ohio Music Education Association events, this quality repertoire is sure to be successful on any spring concert or other event as well! For even more recommendations, please contact us.

About the Author:
Jen has been with Stanton’s since 2006. A former middle school and high school choral director, and an active choral singer and accompanist throughout the Central Ohio area, she also enjoys eating good food, running (to counteract the good food!) and the Muppets.


NEW in Contemporary A Cappella 20 January, 2015

Contemporary a cappella music gets more and more popular every year! With high-profile features like “The Sing-Off” and “Pitch Perfect,” many high schools and colleges are getting in on the action as well! Here are a few of Stanton’s new favorites for contemporary a cappella ensembles:

fun. (Medley from The Sing-Off) arr. Deke Sharon
America’s favorite a cappella show returned for another smash mini-season in 2013 with show-stoppers like this medley from super group fun. If you are up for no lip-synching, back-up bands or safety net, this chart is for you! Includes: Carry On, Some Nights, We Are Young.

I Need Your Love arr. Ben Bram
DJ Calvin Harris collaborated with English performer Ellie Goulding on this top-forty hit. Ben Bram’s contemporary treatment is sure to be a hit with your a cappella group!

Groovin’ arr. Kirby Shaw
The #1 hit from 1967 by the Young Rascals in a smooth vocals-only setting perfectly captures the relaxed slow groove of the song with an easy vocal accompaniment and an irresistible solo. Also available TTBB and SSAA.

I’ve Had the Time of My Life arr. Deke Sharon
Featured on NBC’s The Sing-Off, this #1 hit by Bill Medley and Jennifer Warnes from the 1987 film “Dirty Dancing” features two soloists with a rich vocal accompaniment. Opening simply, it builds consistently through two key changes to an electrifying final cadence.

Skyfall arr. J.A.C. Redford
The hit single by Adele from the motion picture “Skyfall” has been creatively arranged by J.A.C Redford, the orchestrator of the film. Using vocal percussion and divisi vocal parts, J.A.C. has created a setting that is perfect for jazz and show choirs as well as concert choirs.

If I Die Young arr. Ben Bram
This poignant story about a young life lost too early touched listeners around the world when released by The Band Perry. Ben’s contemporary a cappella setting is an appropriate choice for more reflective concert occasions. Also available SSAA.

Royals arr. Deke Sharon
This 2013 song by Lorde topped the Hot 100, AC and Rock charts and won the Grammy for song of the year and best pop performance. This a cappella setting will be a hit with pop, jazz and a cappella groups in high school, college and beyond! Also available SSAA.

Turn on the Radio arr. Bryan Sharpe
Contemporary a cappella groups will enjoy this Reba McEntire top hit as they sing about a relationship gone bad. “So listen Romeo, when you’re feelin’ kinda lonely, let me tell you where to go: turn on the radio!”

Little Lion Man arr. Deke Sharon
The debut single from 2009 by Mumford & Sons from their debut album “Sigh No More” packs a folk rock punch in this arrangement for unaccompanied male voices.

The Circle Game arr. Kate MacColl
Originally created for Vancouver’s ensemble Elektra, this concert arrangement features a soloist as it weaves the melody through every section in the ensemble. Multiple key changes add to the musicality of this delightful setting of a Joni Mitchell favorite.

For more a cappella suggestions, contact our Choral Department at 1.800.426.8742, ext. 1.


Pop Music for Spring 2015 for Middle School Choirs 19 January, 2015

by Jen Sper & Rachel Steele, School Choral Specialists

If you’re planning a concert of popular music with your choir this spring, we’ve got some great recommendations for you! Lighter repertoire is a fun option for end-of-year concerts, but don’t forget to find some good musical challenges for your students as well – you want to showcase all the progress they’ve made throughout the school year!

Shooting Star arr. Audrey Snyder
It’s time for you to shine! The fresh sounds of Owl City continue to delight fans across the globe. Young singers will love recreating the music with this accessible arrangement!

Wooly Bully arr. Jay Althouse
Sam the Sham and The Pharoahs became a worldwide sensation with this novelty hit based on a standard blues progression. Easy-to-sing harmonies and fun lyrics will stick with you long after the concert has ended. As for the strange title: according to Sam, “The name of my cat was Wooly Bully, so I started from there.”

Can’t Buy Me Love arr. Roger Emerson
Celebrate 50 years of the Beatles with this energetic song from 1964! Set in a rock style swing, the voices trade off, and the blues chord progression makes it easy to add guitar! A great showcase for younger and developing choirs!

Aladdin (Broadway Medley) arr. Mac Huff
Disney’s hit film from 1992 is now a dazzling, enchanting and invigorating Broadway musical! With the fabulous classic songs and several delightful new additions, this 14-minute medley will be a spectacular concert feature for choirs of all ages. It’s “Genie-us!”

For more suggestions, click here to view our complete School Choral promotion for Spring 2015, or contact us!

About the Authors:
Jen Sper has been with Stanton’s since 2006. A former middle school and high school choral director, she holds a Bachelor of Music Education degree from Baldwin Wallace College Conservatory of Music. An active choral singer and accompanist throughout the Central Ohio area, she also enjoys eating good food, running (to counteract the good food…) and the Muppets.

Rachel Steele has been at Stanton’s since 2013. She previously taught middle school and high school band and choir for 13 years, and holds a Bachelor’s and Master’s degree in music education from The Ohio State University. Currently a member of the Heisey Wind Ensemble and a musician at Epiphany Lutheran Church (Pickerington OH), Rachel also enjoys reading, sewing, baking and the Pittsburgh Steelers!


Give Me a Bucket 16 January, 2015

give me a bucket.jpg Stanton’s is proud to feature author and composer Mark Shelton as our first guest author for the Stanton’s blog.  Check out what Mark has to say about his latest resource, “Give Me A Bucket.”

Whether you are a middle school band director looking for a clever way to feature your percussionists or a general music teacher searching for a crowd-pleasing instrumental, a bit of bucket drumming can provide a fun-filled solution.  Bucket drumming has come to the elementary music classroom and the band hall with instructors and students getting in on the joy of pounding a pail.  Forming this type of ensemble is easy on the budget and provides a great vehicle for learning rhythms and exploring tone colors.

Clear directions are laid out for bucket drumming success in Give Me A Bucket (click here for a short tutorial.)  In addition to guiding you through the process of setting up your bucket ensemble, Give Me A Bucket provides a dozen short, easy-to-learn pieces, rehearsal tips, simple choreography, and a recording for study and inspiration.  Give Me A Bucket is suggested for grades 4-8 and the pieces are grouped by level of difficulty. All the pieces can be played with basic single stroke percussion skills. There are no rolls, flams, or complicated sticking patterns in the entire collection.

While most of the ensembles are written for different sizes of buckets playing polyphony,  a few works are scored for unison playing. One such ensemble is “Strange Asparagus” which makes clever use of Boomwhackers™ as the striking implement. The pitched tubes provide a bit of harmony and a colorful visual component.

Give Me A Bucket was featured at Stanton’s General Music Clinic facilitated by nationally recognized elementary music specialist, Sharon Burch http://youtu.be/TN067m4iddQ

Check out a performance of “Bucket Rock 101” with fourth and fifth grade students from Lannoye Elementary in Pulaski, WI.   http://youtu.be/ruB0VqgkHYo

My short bucket drumming tutorial can be found at http://youtu.be/-eGFsWHGong

Go ahead…set up a few pails, hand your students some sticks, pass out the parts, and let the bucket jam begin!

mark sheltonMark Shelton has presented hundreds of arts-in-education performances as a percussion soloist and as leader of the world music ensemble Tin Roof Tango. From the early days of his career as Visiting Artist at Coastal Carolina Community College to his current work as a soloist, clinician, sideman, and entrepreneur, Mark has created programs, products, and educational services for a variety of ages. Educational articles by Mark have appeared in Percussive Notes, Activate!, Dulcimer Players News, and Worship Musician.  (If you love “Give Me A Bucket“, also check out Mark’s previous publication “Give Me A Groove“.)


Pop Music for Spring 2015 for High School Choirs 15 January, 2015

by Jen Sper & Rachel Steele, School Choral Specialists

If you’re planning a concert of popular music with your choir this spring, we’ve got some great recommendations for you! Lighter repertoire is a fun option for end-of-year concerts, but don’t forget to find some good musical challenges for your students as well – you want to showcase all the progress they’ve made throughout the school year!

Counting Stars arr. Mark Brymer
The band OneRepublic performs music that reflects many musical influences, from rock to pop to indie and more. This hit from 2013 has a driving rhythm and unforgettable chorus that will electrify your stage! The 3-part mixed and 2-part alternate voicings offer a nice opportunity for a combined number for all your ensembles.

Ease On Down the Road arr. Mac Huff
From “The Wiz,” this stand-out R&B classic retains all the energy, optimism and Broadway pizzazz you could ever imagine! Now in a fantastic new arrangement, it’s perfect for pop, show and concert choirs as an opener, closer or concert theme.

Save the World/Don’t You Worry Child arr. Mark Brymer
Inspired by the vibrant a cappella sounds of the vocal group Pentatonix, this accessible setting of the mash-up by Swedish House Mafia is accompanied with keyboard and rhythm section, making this a fantastic showcase for high school pop and show choirs. Or, try it a cappella for true Pentatonix flavor!

Step In Time arr. Philip Kern
From Disney’s hit Broadway musical “Mary Poppins” comes this toe-tapping, broom-sweeping jewel! Accessible vocal writing provides thrills throughout for mixed voices and for the guys as well. Instrumental parts for this show-stopper are also available.

For more suggestions, click here to view our complete School Choral promotion for Spring 2015, or contact us!

About the Authors:
Jen Sper has been with Stanton’s since 2006. A former middle school and high school choral director, she holds a Bachelor of Music Education degree from Baldwin Wallace College Conservatory of Music. An active choral singer and accompanist throughout the Central Ohio area, she also enjoys eating good food, running (to counteract the good food…) and the Muppets.

Rachel Steele has been at Stanton’s since 2013. She previously taught middle school and high school band and choir for 13 years, and holds a Bachelor’s and Master’s degree in music education from The Ohio State University. Currently a member of the Heisey Wind Ensemble and a musician at Epiphany Lutheran Church (Pickerington OH), Rachel also enjoys reading, sewing, baking and the Pittsburgh Steelers!


Combo Concerts: Band-O-Rama 14 January, 2015

band o ramarecommended by Ken Tilger and Rachel Steele

The concert schedule for lots of schools is the same year-in and year-out.  Consider shaking things up this year with a “combo” concert!  Combine your groups across levels (imagine how big your band will be with students grades 5-12!) or across genres (your 6th grade choir would love to sing a piece or a medley with your high school jazz band!).

Ending the school year with a “mass” concert of bands in all grade levels is a common enough practice.  It’s great for your beginner students to hear the more advanced groups, and good for your high school bands to remember how exciting that first year of band was.  Of course, once you have all of those kids in the same room, everyone wants to hear them play together.  It’s the same challenge every year:  Pieces that are easy enough for your beginners make your older students roll their eyes; but who wants to spend the time re-writing and editing a grade 4 piece so that your 5th graders can play too?

THERE IS A SOLUTION that doesn’t involve you earning more grey hairs!  Several pieces are available that are specifically designed for this purpose, with all of the work done for you.  Each of the pieces below comes in two or three different versions that are intended to be played together.

bandoramaBand-O-Rama by Sandy Feldstein and Larry Clark

High School Set (PT-YCB06A-00)………………………………………………….$40.00

Elem./Intermediate Set (PT-YCB06B-00)…………………………………….$40.00

Band-O-Rama is a wonderful march designed for combined performance of beginning, intermediate and high school bands. The composition is available in two versions, one for high school band and one with parts for both elementary and intermediate bands.   Your high school students will play their parts (an easy grade 3) without much effort, while elementary students will need to be able to play in the keys of Bb and Eb Concert (limited range) and have mastered the dotted quarter/eighth note rhythm.  This piece is in the standard form of an American march, so it’s a great piece to being teaching about that form and tradition.

shorewood overtureShorewood Overture by Michael Sweeney

All-In-One Set, serves all three levels (04003858)………………………………..$95.00

Rather than the typical massed band number where everyone plays at once, this ingenious overture is written for 3 separate levels of player and allows the players of each level to be featured briefly by themselves, along with sections where everyone plays together. The easiest level includes nothing more difficult than 8th notes (no dotted rhythms) and all clarinet notes under the break, while the intermediate part is perfect for your older middle school students, involving more complex rhythms and an expanded range.  In addition, the “Level 3” parts include cues (also in the Level 3 score) allowing the older students to “jump in” for security if needed.  Includes scores and parts for all levels!

winged victoryWinged Victory by Brian Balmages

Grade 4 Version (B1340)………………………………………………………………..$75.00

Grade 2.5 Version (B1342)……………………………………………………………..$50.00

Grade 1 Version (B1341)…………………………………………………………………$40.00

You’ll be hard-pressed to find a more powerful and inspiring work with such variety of styles and musical material. The eternal fight for freedom and the spirit of community form the groundwork for this impressive mix of proud fanfares, undaunting rhythms, and heartfelt lyrical passages.  The most difficult version is a true grade four, providing a challenge for your older musicians, while even the earliest beginners can handle the easiest version.  The intermediate version has simplified variants of the more difficult material in the fanfare sections, allowing them to be a big part of the action.  Beginner band directors should be aware the the elementary students do rest for a large portion of the piece, so working on musicianship and listening skills is a must!

About the authors:

Ken is a former band director, and has been with Stanton’s since 2004. He enjoys comic books, playing with his young son, and plays saxophone with Swing’s the Thing Big Band. You should check out their album “Walk On Out the Door” available on iTunes and Amazon.

Rachel has been working in the choral department at Stanton’s since 2013.  She previously taught middle school and high school band and choir for 13 years, and holds a bachelor’s and a master’s degree in music education from The Ohio State University.  Currently a member of the Heisey Wind Ensemble and a musician at Epiphany Lutheran Church (Pickerington, OH,) Rachel also enjoys reading, sewing, baking and the Pittsburgh Steelers!

 


Current Hits on Broadway 07 January, 2015

00129024This new release from Hal Leonard  includes songs from the newest Broadway  musicals.   From “Once” to “Beautiful”, one or two songs from each of eighteen shows are included.  This is a great collection for those who are preparing for auditions, or for those who just enjoy the more recent musicals and recent musical revivals.  It would be a great addition to a voice teacher’s library as well. For more information about this collection, or other similar material, call us at 1-800-42-MUSIC, email us at keyboard@stantons.com, or visit our website.  Shop Stanton’s for all your sheet music needs.


Church Reading Session – THIS SATURDAY! 05 January, 2015

Attend Stanton’s Sacred Choral Reading Session this Saturday, January 10th 2015, and you’ll be fully prepared for the remainder of your church choir season. We will be featuring the best new choral publications for Lent, Easter and beyond, as chosen by Stanton’s sacred choral staff. We’re excited to announce that this January’s clinic will be held at Livingston United Methodist Church, just a few blocks from our store in downtown Columbus.

Attending this clinic is a fantastic way for you to choose new church anthems for your choir by hearing the music read live. This January’s clinicians will be Stanton’s own Jennifer Fry and president emeritus Jim Strouse. Please feel free to contact Stanton’s at 1-800-42-MUSIC and speak with a choral staff member for the details of the event. We look forward to seeing you at 8:30 on January 11th for registration, coffee and doughnuts followed by a wonderful morning of singing!

Click here to watch video

Shop Stanton’s for all your sheet music needs!


Church Cantatas for Lent & Easter 2015 02 January, 2015

Lead your congregation in Holy Week and Easter worship with one of these dynamic cantatas, as recommended by Stanton’s expert Sacred Choral Music staff!

The Passion and the Promise by Lloyd Larson & Mark Hayes
The many moods of Holy Week, followed by the triumph of Easter, are captured in this moving work by Lloyd Larson and Mark Hayes, with narration by Pamela Stewart. From the celebration of Palm Sunday to the despair of Good Friday to the triumph of the Resurrection, “The Passion and the Promise” presents fresh, dynamic words and music with creative narration. Perform each anthem separately during Holy Week and Easter, or together as an unforgettable 25-minute musical.

The Final Hours by Lee & Susan Dengler
Create a moving worship experience for your church and community with “The Final Hours.” Three moving anthems are woven together with the spoken word, focusing on Christ’s final earthly hours. Perfect for a Good Friday service, or performed as separate anthems during Holy Week, this suite is easily prepared and presented. Add the optional flute, cello, and single handbell to enhance the presentation. A great choice for smaller choirs or when time to prepare a larger work is limited. It will surely bring your congregation to a place of reverence, inspiration, and celebration.

For more recommendations for your church choir during the upcoming Lenten and Easter season, please call us at 1.800.426.8742. Shop Stanton’s for all your sheet music needs!


Some to listen, Some to play: Album for the Young 31 December, 2014

14043439This collection of sheet music for piano solo includes sixty-six classics written by the masters for piano solo.  Some are easy enough for children to play: “Les Cinq Doigts #1″ by Igor Stravinsky, “Melody” and “Soldier’s March” from Schumann’s collection, “Album for the Young” are among these.  The rest are to play for children.  There is a transcription of “The Elephant” from Saint-Saens’ “Carnival of the Animals.”

Francis Poulenc wrote about Babar, the little elephant.  “The Tea Shop” is a musical representation of Babar taking some friends to a tea shop, where they have some delicious cakes.  Two of J. S. Bach’s two-part inventions are included.  The most recent piece was written by George Fenton.  It’s called “At the Beach”.  This music can appeal to any age player,  or to play for any age child or young person.  The music spans several styles of composition.  It’s a perfect collection for exploring the classics from Bach to the 21st  century.  For more information about this collection or others like it, contact us at 1-800-42-MUSIC, email us at keyboard@stantons.com, or visit our website. Shop Stanton’s for all your sheet music needs!


IPA Made Easy 29 December, 2014

Singing in foreign languages is an important benchmark in students’ choral education – but, teaching languages and pronunciation can be intimidating for some teachers. How many years has it been since YOUR last diction class? And if you’re new to the vocal side of music education, you may have NO experience with foreign languages (outside of Italian musical terms!).

The handy guidebook Alfred’s IPA Made Easy is an easy reference for the symbols used in the International Phonetic Alphabet (IPA): what they look like and how they are pronounced. IPA is a standard set of symbols used for notating pronunciation of spoken language; because the symbols are consistent across languages, a basic understanding provides guidance for singers as they expand their experience with new languages.

Example words for every symbol are included in English, Latin, Italian, German, French, and Spanish. An online resource includes demonstrations of every sound, recorded by a professional voice teacher.  A clear and concise tool for singing in foreign languages, equally useful in the choir room and the vocal studio.

For more choral education resources, please contact us!


Wilbur Held Organ Music 23 December, 2014

10-618New Every Morning” is a new collection of organ solos arranged by longtime favorite arranger Wilbur Held.    This collection of sheet music for organ includes six settings of  morning hymns.  Titles include “When Morning Gilds the Skies” and “Morning Has Broken”.  This collection of new settings for morning hymns is bound to please!  For more information about this collection of sheet music for organ, or other sacred organ collections, call us at 1-800-42-MUSIC, email us at keyboard@stantons.com, or visit our website.  Shop Stanton’s for all your sheet music needs!


Live from The Midwest Clinic – Day 2 19 December, 2014

exhibit hall entranceby Ken Tilger, Band Education Specialist

Day 2 of the 2014 Midwest Clinic has come and gone, and it was quite an active day. The Stanton’s booth was busy, especially around mid-day with plenty of educators and students loading up on method books, solo and ensemble repertoire, and new concert pieces. One of my favorite aspects of working our booth is meeting directors that we don’t know, passing along our new band music promotions, and explaining our selection process.

Visitors to the Stanton’s booth included our good friend James Swearingen, FJH orchestra composer Lauren Bernofsky, and Hal Leonard arranger Johnnie Vinson. In addition, I had an engaging and enthusiastic conversation with Alfred composers Chris Bernotas and Vince Gassi. Band Education Specialist Kent White attended the session on Scale & Rhythm Chunks by Ohio’s own Richard Canter. It was standing room only with over 500 people attending his session, and we have all but sold out of the copies we had at the booth!

One of the other unique elements of The Midwest Clinic is the number of composers and arrangers on-hand. As mentioned above, I spent quite a bit of time today speaking with Chris Bernotas and Vince Gassi, as well as Randall Standridge, Grand Mesa president Walter Cummings, and FJH composers Travis Weller and Brian Balmages.

cab

The “Barnhouse Party Bus,” on the way to dinner

maggianoAgain our day was capped off witbarney awardh a fantastic meal, this time at Maggiano’s Little Italy courtesy of C.L. Barnhouse. It’s in a great historic building that probably dates to the 20’s. To our surprise Stanton’s along with RBC Music of Texas were honored with the presentation of the “Barney” Award in recognition of our long relationship in selling and promoting Barnhouse titles. A much appreciated and heartfelt presentation was given by James Swearingen. I also got to hear a number of fantastic (and hilarious) stories about Chuck Barnhouse since I was seated between Barnhouse president Andy Clark and Ed Peterson of Omega Recordings, the company that records the Washington Winds.

That’s all for today from The Windy City (or Gotham if you’re a fan of the Christopher Nolan Batman Trilogy).

About the Author
Ken is a former band director, and has been with Stanton’s since 2004. He is thrilled to have had gelato and fantastic cheesecake for dessert over the past two nights! Seriously, Cheesecake Factory – meh.


Elementary Musicals for Spring 15 December, 2014

Ready to start planning your elementary spring musical? This year, Stanton’s has something for everyone! Check out these new musicals that will motivate and excite both you and your students!

We Honor the Brave by Dave & Jean Perry
Suggested for Grades K-8
Performance time: approx. 20 minutes
Perfect for any patriotic event, We Honor the Brave is a reproducible musical celebration honoring the men and women who have risked or given their lives to protect our country and those who are currently serving in all branches of the military. Set at a Veterans’ Day parade, five speaking characters, comprised of two older and three younger Americans, tell the story. The additional cast members can be used in a number of ways in each scene – as spectators or parade members. Even the audience is a part of the parade-going crowd while your singers perform original and familiar patriotic songs, including a rap! It’s a wonderful program that works easily for all young singers through middle school. Included are simple staging, prop, performance, and costume suggestions, as well as full performance and accompaniment tracks, reproducible singer pages, and a poster and program for your use to market the show. A Veteran’s Interview is also included for your students to use to learn about local veterans. The seven original and familiar songs include Land of the Free, Yankee Doodle, The Open Sea, On Land On Sea and in the Air, Flying, Veterans’ Day Rap and a reprise of Land of the Free.

Goal! by John Jacobson & John Higgins
Suggested for Grades 1-5
Performance time: approx. 25 minutes
Did you know that over 13 million Americans play soccer? The game that Brazilian “football” legend Pele called “The Beautiful Game” is the setting for this amazingly entertaining musical that not only celebrates the beauty and glory of the sport, but also the value of good sportsmanship, setting goals, being a part of a team and more. Goal is a musical that every cast member will love to perform, whether sports is their “thing” or not. In this musical, nobody is cut from the team, and with musical styles from Latin to Rap and Pop to Broadway, we celebrate setting goals and working as a team to accomplish amazing things together! This ALL-SCHOOL 25-minute musical features five original songs and script with over 30 speaking parts. Songs include: Goal, Awesome, Kick It, El Juego Bonito (The Beautiful Game), It’s Not If You Win.

Freddie the Frog and the Jungle Jazz by Sharon Burch & Rosana Eckert
Suggested for Grades 2-5
Performance time: approx. 25 minutes
Freddie the Frog, Eli the Elephant, Babs Baboon and Micki Macaw join trumpet-playing elephants, trombone-sliding tigers, clarinet-playing monkeys and a flock of seagulls as they scat sing, swing and perform collective improvisation in this swingin’ introduction to jazz. The 25-minute musical for 2nd-5th grade students includes five original songs and dialog with 26 speaking parts, along with unique “beginner band student” adaptations giving students a chance to squawk, buzz and growl on stage as they argue about who’s the best. Sharing their combined talent, the animal friends discover embracing each other’s differences creates the ultimate jungle jam. Songs include Jungle Jazz, We’re the Best, Jungle Jam, I’m So Sorry My Friend, Let’s Celebrate.

Making the Band by Roger Emerson & John Jacobson
Suggested for Grades 4-8
Performance time: approx 25 minutes
“Move that car! We’re ready to begin. A garage is a place to make music in. With keyboard, drums, guitar and bass; add a singer and we’re all in place!” Explore the instruments of a rock band and start your own garage band. This unique musical revue features fresh new arrangements for unison voices with optional harmony that are accessible and appropriate for upper elementary and middle school singers. Use the program dialog for performance options; connect to the standards with teaching objectives for each song; and extend learning with online video interviews featuring John Jacobson and the studio musicians who recorded the songs in musical revue. “Here we go; the band is complete. We got the singer and we got the beat! Let’s twist and shout and harmonize, too. We’re ready to play a tune for you.” Songs include: We Got the Beat, Twist and Shout, Stand By Me, Your Song, Livin’ on a Prayer, Making the Band.

Pirates 2: The Hidden Treasure by “Captain” John Jacobson & “Jolly” Roger Emerson
Suggested for Grades 4-8
Performance time: approx. 35 minutes
ARRRR! Our favorite rascally pirates are back at work, seeking adventure and treasure on the high seas! But a mighty storm rolls in and the pirates find themselves shipwrecked on a deserted island, or is it? Will the King of the High “C’s” have a plan to save the day? Through the course of their musical adventures, they discover that real treasure is something they have plenty of … friendship and family. Designed for performers in upper elementary and middle school, this 35-minute musical features six original songs, with connecting script and over 20 speaking parts. The Teacher Edition is filled with quality performance material including piano/vocal song arrangements and choreography, script and helpful production guide. For added value, the ready-to-use student books include songs and script, and will enhance the musical experience for your young aspiring actors/singers! Songs include: A Pirate I Will Be, The Storm, The King’s Plan, Talent to Burn, Who Cares, We’ve Got Friends!

Need more ideas or suggestions? Call or email Stanton’s Sheet Music and ask to speak with one of our knowledgeable staff members!


Behind the Scenes: Picking School Choral Promotions 01 December, 2014

music listening 2By Rachel Steele, School Choral Specialist

A few months ago, my colleague in the instrumental department, Ken Tilger, wrote a post about how that department picks the items for their promotions.  Not to be outdone, I’d like to take the opportunity to let you know how I and my partner in crime, Jen Sper, pick the items for our school choral promotions.

In late winter or early spring, publishers begin to send us their new releases for fall.  We get stacks of music (with demo CDs) to review from Hal Leonard (including Shawnee, Walton, Boosey & Hawkes, G. Schirmer, Pavane, Fred Bock etc.), Alfred (including Lawson-Gould), Lorenz (including Santa Barbara and Heritage), Carl Fischer (including BriLee), Hinshaw, Alliance, and a few other smaller publishers.  If you are thinking “Wow, that is quite a bit of music,” you’d be correct.  In fact, if you assign each piece an average listening/evaluation time of 3.5 minutes, we spend about 2,200 minutes, or 48 hours, or 6 full working  days (no lunch or potty breaks!) listening to more than 800 new releases.  For more data on our listening, scroll to the bottom.

When we listen, we’re not only keeping an ear out for our in-house promotions, but also for selections for our clinics (such as Stanton’s Super Session and Excellence in Choral Literature), OMEA Large Group Select Suggestions, and even music for Christmas, graduation and other special occasions.

music listening 3Round 1

Jen and I sit with the octavo in front of us and listen to every single selection from beginning to end.  We write our impressions on the cover of the octavo, usually just a few choice words or phrases.  After this, a piece goes into either the “no” or the “maybe” pile.  Our “no” pile is quite a bit larger than our “maybe” pile.  We consider it a good release if 25-30% of a publisher’s titles end up in the “maybe” category.

Round 2

Now that we’ve combed through the riff-raff, it’s time to consider the balance of our selections for our in-house promotions.  We sort our “maybe” pile by voicing, and then by genre.    Just like good concert programing, we are looking for a variety of styles – current pop, classic pop, broadway, folk songs, spirituals, world/multi-cultural, holiday music and various foreign languages.

Round 3

Now it’s time to play through selections at the piano.  We grab a genre and play through, looking for things like:

1.  Is it well written/voiced in all parts?

2.  Will students/teachers get something educational out of this?

3.  Is it enjoyable to sing/play/teach?

4.  Is it appropriate for school?

5.  Will it appeal to a wide variety of customers?

6.  If the song is available in multiple voicings, is one better than the other?  Why?

The answers to these questions will usually make our choices pretty clear, and then it’s time to make our lists, spreadsheets, and the actual promotional materials that you receive in your mailbox!

Promotions by the numbers 2014By the Numbers – This table shows the number of pieces that we promoted this year by publisher, and the percentage of their total offerings that we promoted.  You’ll see that even those publishers with the highest percentage of promoted items rarely break the 30% mark.

Other Points of Interest

  • Jen and I only look at promotions for school choral.  We have two other people who work specifically on selections for church choirs, and they have even more selections to listen to than we do!
  • While it might sound like a cushy job to sit and listen to music for 8 hours a day, it can be mentally exhausting after a while.
  • No, we don’t always agree, but you’d be amazed at how often 2 very opinionated people say the EXACT same thing about a particular piece.
  • If there is something that one of us truly believes is worth fighting for, the other one will generally give in.
  • The best part about the process is discovering a new piece that is just amazing!

We believe that devoting quite a bit of time and effort to this process is very important.   The 75 or so selections that make the cut are things that we recommend to you, our valued customers, for the entire school year. If you have questions about this process (or would like some recommendations), please feel free to give us a call at 1-800-42-MUSIC, ext. 1.

Rachel Steele has been working in the choral department at Stanton’s since 2013.  She previously taught middle school and high school band and choir for 13 years, and holds a bachelor’s and a master’s degree in music education from The Ohio State University.  Currently a member of the Heisey Wind Ensemble and a musician at Epiphany Lutheran Church (Pickerington, OH,) Rachel also enjoys reading, sewing, baking and the Pittsburgh Steelers!


Stanton’s LIVE!: 2014 New Band Music Reading Clinic Recap 20 November, 2014

by Ken Tilger, Band Education Specialist -

The 13th annual Wind Band Invitational and New Band Music Reading Clinic was held November 14-15 at Capital University in Columbus, Ohio. This two-day event featured the reading of 70 of the best new pieces for band with a total of 90 works performed! In addition, 134 students from 59 schools participated in the Honors Wind Ensemble under the direction of Paula Crider and Honors Concert Band directed by Jeffrey Gershman and James Swearingen.

Pickerington HS NorthThe New Music Reading Clinic consisted of 3 reading sessions, 2 by the Directors’ Reading Band; 1 with the Capital University Wind Symphony, covering 61 new band titles from grade 0.5-4.5. Instead of the professional gloss of publisher preview recordings, band directors heard the titles as they were sight-read by live musicians and sight-read some themselves. This is a great way to preview new music in detail, get programming ideas, and network with colleagues after the long marching band season. In addition to the reading sessions, other new titles were presented in a fantastic guest concert performance by the Pickerington High School North Symphonic Winds under the direction of Marc Parulekar.

The Wind Band Invitational featured 4 more concert performances including the Capital University Symphonic Winds, Capital University Wind Symphony, Honors Concert Band, and Honors Wind Ensemble. The honors bands are a wonderful opportunity for some of the best high school players from around Ohio to perform together and work with world-renowned conductors and clinicians, while the university concerts present some of the most challenging repertoire for wind band performed at the highest level.

If you missed this year’s reading clinic, head over to Stanton’s Virtual Workshop – you can view the reading sessions there, and catch footage from the second Directors’ Band session.  You can also check out our previous reading sessions for more great programming ideas, and keep reading our blog for more Stanton’s LIVE events!

About the Author:
Ken is a former band director, and has been with Stanton’s since 2004. He is thankful for his family (especially his 2 year old son), his day gig in the music industry, and that he still gets to play the saxophone.  Oh, and pie!


Five-Finger Holiday Favorites 19 November, 2014

00129231Hal Leonard five-finger piano songbooks are designed for students in their first year of study.  This new collection includes several songs that have not been included in the same collection before.   There are eight songs, including fun favorites “All I Want for Christmas is My Two Front Teeth” and “I Want a Hippopotamus for Christmas”,  the timeless “The Little Drummer Boy”,  “Somewhere in My Memory” from “Home Alone”, and four more.  This collection of easy sheet music for piano includes an optional duet part for another player.  “Holiday Favorites” will keep your youngster(s) busy playing these fun songs during the holiday season!  For more information about this book of Christmas piano music or others you may be interested in, call us at 1-800-42-MUSIC, email us at keyboard@stantons.com, or visit our website.  Shop Stanton’s for all your sheet music needs!


New from Broadway Jr. and Getting To Know 18 November, 2014

broadway jr

logoG2KOur friends at Hal Leonard, MTI, and Rogers & Hammerstein Inc. have some great new choices for you in their “Broadway Junior” and “Getting To Know”  series.  Purchasing the performance pack listed for each show includes everything you need to produce it and grants you the rights to perform it as many times as you like with one year.  Take a look at these latest offerings that your students and audience members will love!

getting to know sound of musicGetting to Know “The Sound of Music”by Richard Rogers and Oscar Hammerstein II

The final collaboration between Rodgers & Hammerstein – The Sound of Music – was destined to become the world’s most beloved musical. When a postulant proves too high-spirited for the religious life, she is dispatched to serve as governess for the seven children of a widowed naval Captain. Her growing rapport with the youngsters, coupled with her generosity of spirit, gradually captures the heart of the stern Captain, and they marry. Upon returning from their honeymoon they discover that Austria has been invaded by the Nazis, who demand the Captain’s immediate service in their navy. The family’s narrow escape over the mountains to Switzerland on the eve of World War II provides one of the most thrilling and inspirational finales ever presented in the theater. The motion picture version remains the most popular movie musical of all time.

Preview Pack (00124211) ………………………………………………………………$15.00

Performance Pack (08754014)………………………………………………………..$650.00

Shrek jrShrek, Jr.by Jeanine Tesori

In a faraway kingdom, the green ogre Shrek finds his swamp invaded by banished fairytale misfits, runaways who’ve been cast off by Lord Farquaad, a tiny terror with big ambitions. When Shrek sets off with a wise-cracking donkey to confront Farquaad, he’s handed a task – if he rescues feisty Princess Fiona from the Dragon-guarded tower, his swamp will be returned to him. But, a fairy tale wouldn’t be complete without unexpected twists and turns along the way.

Preview Pack (00127656)……………………………………………………………… $10.00

Performance Pack (00127646) ………………………………………………………. $645.00

hairsprayjr. jpgHairspray Jr.Marc Shaiman

It’s 1962, and spunky plus-size teen Tracy Turnblad has one big dream — to dance on the popular Corny Collins Show. When she finally gets her shot, she’s transformed from social outcast to sudden star. In balancing her new-found power with her desire for justice, Tracy fights to dethrone the reigning Miss Teen Hairspray, Amber von Tussle, and integrate a TV network in the process. With the help of her outsized mom, Edna, and guest DJ Motormouth Maybelle, the rhythm of Tracy’s new beat just might prove unstoppable.

Preview Pack (00123343)………………………………………………………………..$10.00

Performance Pack (099717310)……………………………………………………….$645.00

 

If you’ve never worked with a Broadway Jr. show before, click here to read our previous post on the “how to’s,”  and here for some alternatives if you aren’t ready for a production that’s quite this big.  Questions?  Give us a call at 1-800-42-MUSIC, and we’ll be happy to assist you!