News & Views Friday, December 09, 2016

Category: Orchestra

Classic Repertoire for More Advanced String Orchestra 08 December, 2016

recommended by Dan C., Orchestra Music Specialist

The cream-of-the-crop of this year’s Baroque, Classical and Romantic pieces in outstanding educational arrangements.

Concerto in D for Strings by Telemann/arr. Steven Frackenpohl, Grade 3
Telemann can always provide concert sparkle as his music falls in the cusp between Baroque and Classical. Everyone has active parts: the higher parts have more flash, while the lower parts ground the piece with rolling basso continuo. There is chromaticism, on-the-string 16ths and rhythmic drive – just what you want from Telemann.

Allegro Spiritoso (from Divertimento #8, K213) by W.A. Mozart/arr. Marcia Stockton, Grade 3
A natural piece for string orchestra, this effervescent movement from Divertimento #8, K213, originally for wind sextet, will keep everyone spiritedly on their toes. With its Classical style, chromaticism and 16th note pickups, it is marvelous Mozart all the way!

Lady Radnor’s Suite: Slow Minuet by Sir Hubert Parry/arr. Robert Sieving, Grade 3
Sir Hubert Parry was influenced by Wagner, Brahms and Mendelssohn and passed on his passion to students such as Holst, Vaughan Williams & Frank Bridge. This movement would be excellent for smaller chamber groups where you can polish a sense of ensemble, concentrate on color, timbre and balance and encourage an artfully elegant, mature sound.

Symphony #104 Finale by F.J. Haydn/arr. Todd Parrish, Grade 3.5
The sparkle of this masterwork is undeniable. This exuberant finale, masterfully arranged, is Haydn at his best. As is typical of Haydn, the melody is in the upper strings and the harmony in the lower, but it is still an excellence teaching piece for everyone on the classical style, bow technique, shifting and dynamics.

Presto (from Symphony #1) by F.J. Haydn/arr. Robert D. McCashin, Grade 4
This spirited opening movement of Haydn’s First Symphony would actually make a fantastic closer for any high school performance! It demonstrates his substantial range of invention, organization of thought, musical ideas, and inventive compositional prowess at a young age. The movement is full of rhythmic and harmonic surprises and though the violins get the melodic action, the other parts drive it, so everyone is kept plenty busy. Use it to teach 16th note scales, dynamic extremes and accidentals on G#, D# and A#.

Intermezzo (from Carmen) by Georges Bizet/arr. John Caponegro, Grade 4
To provide an “ahh” factor to any high school concert, choose this glorious, flowing operatic gem from a master of melody. Incorporating triplets, grace notes, shifting and plenty of rubato, your basses will solidly anchor it while everyone else glimmers.

You can find more orchestra classics on our website, or contact us for recommendations especially for your ensemble. Shop Stanton’s for all your sheet music needs!

About the Author:
Dan C. has worked at Stanton’s since 1979, primarily with orchestra music and print promotions. A “working” musician, he’s a classical cellist, a rock & jazz bassist and a folk & country guitarist/singer. His free time is spent with family or reading, gardening, cycling and working puzzles. His series of musical puzzles (RP3 Rebus Puzzle Picture People) can be found on the Stanton’s Facebook page each Sunday. He also has a reputation as a pretty good joke teller. Seriously.


Join us at The Midwest Clinic! 08 December, 2016

midwest-clinic-mastheadby Ken Tilger, Band Education Specialist –

Stanton’s Sheet Music is excited to be exhibiting at The Midwest Clinic for our third consecutive year on December 14-16, 2016!

Join band specialists Kent White, Ken Tilger, and Kris Lehman, “The Jazz Guy” Ben Huntoon, as well as technology guru/computer ninja David Ginter and Stanton’s Sheet Music President Eric Strouse at McCormick Place, Booth #1227. Browse and shop hundreds of titles for wind band, orchestra, jazz ensemble, and solo & ensemble, gift items, and more while taking advantage of their combined 100+ years of sheet music expertise. Trivia and useless knowledge provided free of charge!

We look forward to seeing you in Chicago!

The Lowdown
The Midwest Clinic
December 14-16, 2016
McCormick Place
Chicago, IL

Booth #1227

Exhibit Hall Hours:
Wednesday, 9:30 am – 5:00 pm
Thursday, 9:00 am – 5:00 pm
Friday, 9:00 am – 4:00 pm

About the Author:
Ken is a former band director, and has been with Stanton’s since 2004.  Besides music, he geeks out on comic books, amusement parks, hockey, and all things Pittsburgh.  He’s excited to get NHLTV for Christmas so he can watch the Penguins – Let’s Go Pens!


World Music for Orchestra 18 November, 2016

recommended by Dan C., Orchestra Music Specialist

Visit Asia, Central and South America without leaving the orchestra room!

Kon’nichiwa by Keiko Yamada, Grade 0.5
“Kon’nichiwa” is the Japanese word that loosely translates to hello. It is a Japanese word that many students will be familiar with. It was chosen for this piece in particular, because it is an introductory level piece for very young students who are just learning to play their instruments, and because it is a friendly hello to the performers and audiences. The piece is based on the pentatonic scale and uses limited eighth-note rhythms. A happy main theme is contrasted by the more legato and lyrical second theme that should be lush and full sounding. It is very tuneful, with pleasant harmonies and it keeps everyone busy, which is ideal for beginners. You can adjust the tempo to whatever you think will work best for your students. If you are smiling when you play this piece, then you are doing it right. Have fun!

Ninja by Richard Meyer, Grade 1
There’s a ninja on the loose and he’s sneaking through the orchestra. But not for long! Your students will love making up storylines for what happens next in this colorful Asian-flavored piece that uses only the notes of the D Major scale. There are plenty of great teaching opportunities here for your first-year students, including pizzicato, accents, crescendos, and melody/accompaniment balance. Fun for everyone!

Takeda No Komoriuta by Keiko Yamada, Grade 2
This popular and beautiful Japanese folk song is a lullaby, but rather than it being a quiet, gentle song to put a child to sleep, it is sung by the girl Takeda to soothe herself through a difficult situation. The goal of the composer was to bring out its pensive nature and to offer the haunting E minor pentatonic tune in a variety of presentations. Although slow, there is lots of movement in everyone’s part. The violas state the melody at the beginning over drones in the lower strings, with pizzicato in the upper strings emulating a Japanese stringed instrument known as the koto. This is followed by a lush and lyrical statement with thick harmonies while the first violins carry the tune. The cellos then add arpeggiated chords along with a harmonized version of the melody in the second violins. The cellos are then given the melody with a new harmonic presentation by the other strings in parallel motion. This all builds to the climatic statement of the song one last time that leads to a dramatic pause on an extended chord, which then subdues to a short coda to complete the work. Expressive and gorgeous.

C Here by Seth Gamba, Grade 2
Based on the Brazilian baiao rhythm, this work serves to reinforce the difference between the high two and low two fingering patterns (the first on the D string and the second on the A string). It is a fun-filled educational experience for students.

Uno, Dos, Bass! by Richard Meyer, Grade 2
It’s a fiesta for your basses in this colorful section feature that your students will love putting together. Carefully written to make your bass section sound their best, this piece written by Richard Meyer starts with “Chiapanecas” (the famous Mexican “Clapping Song”) and segues into a clever 2/4 version of “Cielito Lindo.” The two songs are then heard simultaneously, bringing this “mini concerto” to a rousing conclusion. ¡Olé!

Looking for more multicultural options for strings? Visit our website! You can also contact us for more recommendations. Remember – shop Stanton’s for all your sheet music needs!

About the Author:
Dan C. has worked at Stanton’s since 1979, primarily with orchestra music and print promotions. A “working” musician, he’s a classical cellist, a rock & jazz bassist and a folk & country guitarist/singer. His free time is spent with family or reading, gardening, cycling and working puzzles. His series of musical puzzles (RP3 Rebus Puzzle Picture People) can be found on the Stanton’s Facebook page each Sunday. He also has a reputation as a pretty good joke teller. Seriously.


Uplifting Programmatic Pieces for Strings – Grade 2-2.5 21 October, 2016

recommended by Dan C., Orchestra Music Specialist

The best energetic program pieces of the year for younger string players!

Wave Dancer by Alan Lee Silva, Grade 2.5
Another wonderfully syncopated and sparkling “theme without a movie” from Alan Lee Silva. A jubilant F-Lydian introduction ushers in Wave Dancer. The harmonized, lyrical violin melody and the accented, syncopated phrases create a joyful and celebratory atmosphere from the opening measure. The driving C pedal point in the cellos propel the lilting violin phrases on toward the main theme. Syncopated rhythms are played precisely and accented, as well as lyrically and smoothly. The violins play expressively and passionately with precise 3, 3, 2, eighth-note syncopated accents. The mid- and low strings are expansive and play their sustains strongly with a beautiful, full sound. An abrupt key change up one step from C to D major gives the piece a boost in energy. It closes heroically with fortissimo unison sixteenth notes, leading to the final robust downbeat. Joyous!

Fire in the Bow by Brian Balmages, Grade 2
Conceived as an energetic and musically rewarding work, this piece also happens to be an excellent vehicle for teaching and reinforcing low 1 fingerings (violin/viola), “backward” extensions (cello), and half position (bass). The piece avoids augmented seconds and focuses on simple finger patterns while exploring dynamic harmonies that create wonderful tension and release throughout. A fantastic opener or closer, it keeps everyone busy and propels the music right up to the end!

Lost Horizon by Thom Sharp, Grade 2.5
This original work by Thom Sharp is an energetic adventure-themed rondo in which every section takes the lead heading off into the horizon looking for adventure. The rhythm of the A theme is used for new melodies in the contrasting sections, either in its original form or starting on a different beat to create a new, yet familiar, rhythm. The last iteration of the A melody employs augmentation. All of these devices provide ample opportunity for instructing students in form and structure and provide for efficient rehearsal time!

You can find more programmatic pieces for Grade 2-2.5 strings on our website! Or, give us a call – 1.800.42.MUSIC – and we’ll be happy to help! Shop Stanton’s for all your sheet music needs!

About the Author:
Dan C. has worked at Stanton’s since 1979, primarily with orchestra music and print promotions. A “working” musician, he’s a classical cellist, a rock & jazz bassist and a folk & country guitarist/singer. His free time is spent with family or reading, gardening, cycling and working puzzles. His series of musical puzzles (RP3 Rebus Puzzle Picture People) can be found on the Stanton’s Facebook page each Sunday. He also has a reputation as a pretty good joke teller. Seriously.


It’s a Christmas “Cello-bration!” 03 October, 2016

recommended by Dan C., Orchestra Music Specialist

Wonderful new holiday music for string orchestra at various grade levels to satisfy all of your groups.

German Christmas Carols arr. Sandra Dackow, Grade 1
Although relatively unknown, these three carols (one is “O Come, Little Children”) will still add festiveness to a holiday concert and give you something new and fresh. With the multicultural bonus, they will also help teach bow placement, cut time, tempo changes and key changes. Everyone gets some melody on these holiday tunes associated with singing children. Add optional sleigh bells for a jolly touch.

Christmas in the Renaissance arr. Robert A. Curry, Grade 2
Three dancelike carols circa mid-1500s (“Riu, Riu, Chiu;” “Dadme Albricias Hijos d’eva;” “Ding, Dong Merrily On High”) that will help reinforce cut time and low “1” (using accidentals.) Generously scored, it also has tambourine, bodhran and glockenspiel parts for authentic color.

Christmas Cello-bration arr. Bob Phillips, Grade 2
Your hot-shot cellos are showcased on “What Child Is This?,” “Oh Come, Oh Come, Emmanuel” and “Angels We Have Heard on High.” Cellos get 3rd & 4th position practice (first violins shift too) and everyone gets to experience key and style changes and an accidental G#.

The Little Drummer Boy arr. Bob Cerulli, Grade 2
Who needs a drummer, when your strings can play col legno for a drum-like effect? This popular, modern Christmas classic will fall together fast as you are reinforcing Bb and F notes. The upper strings carry most of the melodic material while the lower strings have a very effective ground bass. A refreshing, inventive arrangement!

Silent Night arr. Jeffrey E. Turner, Grade 2.5
Do you use a pianist with your string orchestra? This arrangement needs piano and even offers solo moments for it as well as principal cello and violin. With a tip of the hat to the Mannheim Steamroller, this fresh, ethereal setting in 4/4 time will help teach staggered bowing, triplets, sul tasto and transparency.

Appalachian Snowfall arr. Bob Phillips, Grade 3
The latest chance for you to rock out with the Trans-Siberian Orchestra for your holiday concert. With its engaging, syncopated rock rhythms, eighth note pulse and optional rock rhythm section it could be the highlight of the show. Use electric violin & guitar if you have them.

O Come, O Come Emmanuel arr. Brian Holmes, Grade 3+
Here is a great change of pace for a high school holiday concert. It’s a highly original and energizing version of this popular advent carol. Everyone has fairly challenging parts which incorporate contrasting moods, song “quotes,” and rhythmic stretches with overlaps. Very effective!

Find more holiday options for strings on our website, or contact us for personalized recommendations. Shop Stanton’s for all your sheet music needs!

About the Author:
Dan C. has worked at Stanton’s since 1979, primarily with orchestra music and print promotions. A “working” musician, he’s a classical cellist, a rock & jazz bassist and a folk & country guitarist/singer. His free time is spent with family or reading, gardening, cycling and working puzzles. His series of musical puzzles (RP3 Rebus Puzzle Picture People) can be found on the Stanton’s Facebook page each Sunday. He also has a reputation as a pretty good joke teller. Seriously.


The Stanton’s Difference: Make It A Road Trip!! 12 September, 2016

At Stanton’s, we know you have many choices when it comes to purchasing sheet music. Over the next few weeks, we want to take the opportunity to highlight just a few of the many reasons why Stanton’s is the best place to buy music for your school, church, private studio or personal use!

Places where you can browse and buy A LOT of sheet music are hard to come by. It’s amazing how many times we hear, “It’s so nice to be able to look at music before you buy it,” and “I live in                                              , and there is nowhere like this to buy music.” This last statement includes cities like New York and Los Angeles, and has been made by some of the touring Broadway Across America musicians who come through Columbus. If you live within driving distance of Columbus, and you’re wondering if a trip to Stanton’s is worth it the answer is “absolutely!”

Who doesn’t love a road trip? We’re not as far away as you might think. Columbus is only a 2 hour drive from Cleveland and Cincinnati, and 3 hours from Indianapolis, Pittsburgh, Lexington and some of the farther reaches of Ohio. Besides, Stanton’s Sheet Music is in a former A&P grocery store (complete with cupola) that has hundreds of thousands of sheet music titles in stock!

While you’re here, you are welcome to look through and compare all of the music that’s on hand. You can pull up a chair at our listening station or use the Stanton’s app on your smart phone to scan titles and listen to them throughout the store. If it’s your first time at Stanton’s, let us know – we’ll give you a tour! Did we mention that you can also take advantage of our knowledgeable staff, too?

Bring your entire music department! Do you have an upcoming professional development day this fall? We’d love to see your WHOLE music department here in the store! Let us know you’re coming, and we’ll be happy to set aside a table for your group, and we can even start pulling some repertoire suggestions for you to peruse while you’re here.

Need to grab lunch, or staying in town for dinner? In addition to sheet music suggestions, our staff can recommend plenty of great, non-chain places to grab a bite. Within walking distance are Dirty Frank’s, Little Palace, Katzinger’s Delicatessen, and Indian Oven, as well as Mikey’s Late Night Slice and Jeni’s Splendid Ice Creams at the Columbus Commons (and you’ve got to try Jeni’s!). Also nearby are plenty of restaurants in German Village, on Gay Street, and in the Short North and Arena Districts.

Have we given you enough reasons to come to Columbus and visit us? We look forward to seeing you soon!

Click here for more information on the STANTON’S DIFFERENCE!


Easy Classics for Orchestra 07 September, 2016

recommended by Dan C., Orchestra Music Specialist

Introduce your younger groups to a variety of excellent serious literature for string orchestra – here are some of the best for this year!

Medieval Dance by Thibaut deBlason/arr. Michael Story, Grade 0.5
Offering a surprisingly mature sound for very beginners, this super simple, secular sample of mixolydian modal music circa 1200 AD will help teach simple rhythms in 3/4, bow lifts and the 1st/2nd ending concept. Add tambourine and triangle for authenticity.

Theme and Variations from the “Trout” Quintet by Franz Schubert/arr. Andrew Dabczynski, Grade 1.5
Introduce Schubert’s glorious melody as everyone gets to play the famous theme – even basses! There are scattered solos for principal players too. Concentrate on dynamics and keeping pizzicato steady while teaching detaché & brushed strokes to your young players.

French Dance (Jouissance vous donnerai) arr. Deborah Baker Monday, Grade 2
A Renaissance dance (jouissance) where the dancers’ feet stay on the ground, this concert/contest piece in E natural minor with modal harmonies and optional percussion will help train the ears and teach double upbows plus two note slurs followed by two separate notes.

A Nordic Lullaby by Edvard Grieg/arr. Pierre LaPlante, Grade 2.5
Celebrate Grieg’s true genius with this stunning transcription of his “Lyric Piece Op 68, #5.” The melodies & harmonies generously intertwine among the sections of the orchestra as you stress musicality and expression with delicate harmony and accidental Bb and F.

Canarios (from Suite Española) by Gaspar Sanz/arr. Robert Longfield, Grade 2.5
Enjoy this vigorous but flowing movement from “Suite Española,” which juxtaposes 6/8 & 3/4. Written for guitar in 1674, it will allow your students to feel the difference between the time signatures and keep an eye out for accidentals. In emulating the guitar style, upper strings carry the melody, while the lower strings keep the harmonic and rhythmic flow going. Classic, but different!

You can find more classical options for developing strings on our website, or contact us for even more ideas! Shop Stanton’s for all your sheet music needs!

About the Author:
Dan C. has worked at Stanton’s since 1979, primarily with orchestra music and print promotions. A “working” musician, he’s a classical cellist, a rock & jazz bassist and a folk & country guitarist/singer. His free time is spent with family or reading, gardening, cycling and working puzzles. His series of musical puzzles (RP3 Rebus Puzzle Picture People) can be found on the Stanton’s Facebook page each Sunday. He also has a reputation as a pretty good joke teller. Seriously.


A Little “Mischief” Music 17 August, 2016

recommended by Dan C., Orchestra Music Specialist

Trick or Treat! If you are lucky enough to have an orchestra concert toward the end of October, check out these latest options for a ~spooky~ Halloween-themed program.

The Abandoned Funhouse by Brian Balmages, Grade 0.5
Do you have a first concert toward the end of October? You might be able to get your beginners featured on this highly playable, extremely engaging, eerie funhouse tour! Using stepwise motion and no eighth notes, with many instruments only using 5 or 6 notes, you will have to teach them string crossing involving open strings and first violins a one octave D scale, but then you just let the necessary piano (and a wonderfully creepy optional celeste/electronic keyboard) tie it all together for a true showstopper.

A Little Mischief Music by Chris Thomas, Grade 2.5
Conjure up images of wicked forest gnomes and perspicacious pixies for a Middle School Halloween concert. Once your students have learned the difference between marcato and legato as well as how to play low “1” in the high strings and extensions in the cellos, you will have a quirky and fun addition to your concert program where everyone plays important melodic parts. Influenced by dark Russian fairy tales and folk songs it is full of interesting counterpoint and harmonic surprises. Devious but deliciously delightful.

Need more creative programming ideas? Visit our website, or contact us for more personalized recommendations! Shop Stanton’s for all your sheet music needs!

About the Author:
Dan C. has worked at Stanton’s since 1979, primarily with orchestra music and print promotions. A “working” musician, he’s a classical cellist, a rock & jazz bassist and a folk & country guitarist/singer. His free time is spent with family or reading, gardening, cycling and working puzzles. His series of musical puzzles (RP3 Rebus Puzzle Picture People) can be found on the Stanton’s Facebook page each Sunday. He also has a reputation as a pretty good joke teller. Seriously.


The Stanton’s Difference: Big Enough to Serve Your Needs – Small Enough to Serve YOU 03 August, 2016

At Stanton’s, we know you have many choices when it comes to purchasing sheet music. Over the past few weeks, we’ve been highlighting just a few of the many reasons why Stanton’s is the best place to buy music for your school, church, private studio or personal use!

We’re Big Enough to Serve ALL Your Needs
*
Stanton’s Sheet Music has direct access to all major and many minor, independent, and European publishers, allowing us to carry and order hundreds of thousands of print music titles for you.

*Stanton’s e-Tools are designed to make your job easier! Use our Listening Library, Jukebox, Virtual Workshop, Wish List, and Digital Delivery features to compare and organize titles for your music program.

*Itemized purchase orders, bids, and large orders are no problem. We work with many schools around the country and U.S. International schools who “bulk order” over the summer.

*Besides providing music to customers all over the country, access to publishers like Hal Leonard and Alfred combined with stantons.com gives Stanton’s Sheet Music global reach with numerous international orders and worldwide shipping destinations.

But Small Enough to Serve YOU
*
Stanton’s Sheet Music is still a single location, family-owned store in downtown Columbus, Ohio. We do not have a warehouse or call center, and our website is just another way to shop for music with Stanton’s.

*We have 3 departments each with a specific number of dedicated, specialized staff: Choral & General Music, Band & Orchestra, and Keyboard & Pop. While anyone in a respective department can help you, if you find a specific staff member you like to work with, feel free to request them.

*We are your customer service. We answer your phone calls and e-mails. We fill your orders and process your internet orders. We personally handle your “sheet music emergencies.” We solve any problems should they arise. We will get to know you by name, and by working with you over time, get to know your program.

*We are your partner in music education. We choose our Stanton’s Staff Selections to help make your job easier. We organize and conduct Stanton’s numerous clinics, workshops and reading sessions. We develop Stanton’s e-Tools with you, the music teacher, in mind.

We hope that over the course of this series we have given you some reasons to make Stanton’s your #1 choice for sheet music. If not, give us a call or place an order with us, and see why Stanton’s Sheet Music has been Sheet Music Specialists since 1960!

Click here for more information on the STANTON’S DIFFERENCE!


The Stanton’s Difference: Going the Extra Mile 13 July, 2016

At Stanton’s, we know you have many choices when it comes to purchasing sheet music. Over the past few weeks, we’ve been highlighting just a few of the many reasons why Stanton’s is the best place to buy music for your school, church, private studio or personal use! Today we’d like to spotlight a couple of ways the Stanton’s staff goes above and beyond for you.

So you want to program an old title. You call us to order it, or place your order at stantons.com. While taking/processing your order, our knowledgeable staff realizes the age of the title, either because we remember when it was published (yes, many of us have been here that long), or we’re tipped off by the catalog number – in fact, old Belwin/Columbia Pictures numbers contain the year of publication within them. Rather than just place the title on backorder and hope it comes in, we often check the availability of old titles right away! The Alfred and Hal Leonard dealer websites allow us to check the status of a title, and, if it is urgent, we are happy to call our representatives with other publishers on your behalf. This way you know as soon as possible whether you can expect to receive your title, or if you need to consider programming another piece. Sure, we hate to disappoint, but we’d rather you know sooner than later if a piece is unavailable so you can plan accordingly.

You need music in a hurry! Despite your best planning, sometimes music and scores get lost before an impending performance, or an administrator/civic leader requests a specific title that’s not in your library for performance at the end of the week. If you find yourself in a “sheet music emergency,” Stanton’s can help! If the music you need is in-stock, we will strive to get it out to you the same day as long as we have your order before 4:30 pm, and we’ll work with you to find the right balance of expedited shipping time and cost. If your item is not in-stock, we can arrange for drop-ship service directly from most publishers so that your music will ship within 24 hours. If your timetable is REALLY urgent, we will personally call your drop-ship order in to the publisher to ensure that it is handled properly and shipped the same day – most publishers can get expedited orders out the same day if they are placed by noon or 12:30 local (publisher) time. We strongly recommend that if you need to place an expedited or drop-ship order that you call us ASAP so that we can give your order the detailed attention it requires, and give you the service you deserve!

Does your sheet music store do this? If not, give us a call and see why Stanton’s Sheet Music has been the “Sheet Music Specialist” for over 50 years, and why you should shop Stanton’s for all your sheet music needs!

Click here for more information on the STANTON’S DIFFERENCE!


Stanton’s E-Tools: Wishlists 13 June, 2016

wishlistThe amazing staff at Stanton’s knows how valuable your time is. That’s why we try to provide you with as many tools as we can to make choosing music easier,  faster and more enjoyable. In this series of blog posts, we will be profiling our E-tools. Whether you are a local customer here in Columbus, OH or one of our many friends around the world, we hope you will find a way to use our E-tools!

Overheard often at Stanton’s:

  • “I did this piece in high school. I loved it!!! It made my whole year in band/choir/orchestra. I’d love to do it with my kids, but they’re just not ready yet. Sigh. Maybe in a few years.”
  • “There’s so many great new pieces out this year. I can’t do them all this fall, but maybe this spring.”
  • “This would be perfect for a theme concert about ___________. I’ll have to keep it in mind for the future.”
  • “I listened to all those pieces on all those CDs from the publishers, but now I can’t remember what I liked!”

All of the above are great reasons to use the Wish List feature on the Stanton’s website. As musicians, we are always on the lookout for new pieces that will inspire us as well as invigorate and educate our students. The Wish List feature allows you to keep track of pieces you like, and organize them any way you want (by concert program, theme/style, performance year, etc). You can also email your list(s) to friends or colleagues, export it to a Microsoft Excel file for your own records, submit it to your treasurer as a requisition for a purchase order, or send it directly to us at Stanton’s to place your order!

If you have questions about how to use the Stanton’s Wishlist, or if you need further information on any of our e-tools, feel free to call us at 1-800-42-MUSIC or email us at greatservice@stantons.com.

Click here for more in the Stanton’s E-Tools series!


The Stanton’s Difference: 21 Day Trial 03 June, 2016

At Stanton’s, we know you have many choices when it comes to purchasing sheet music. Over the next few weeks, we want to take the opportunity to highlight just a few of the many reasons why Stanton’s is the best place to buy music for your school, church, private studio or personal use!

Stanton’s is one of the largest sheet music retailers in the country, with tens of thousands of titles in stock. We understand that many of our customers can’t make it to our Columbus, Ohio location to peruse music, so we offer a 21 Day Trial service.

How It Works: Music can be secured with either a Stanton’s account or a credit card. We send you the in-stock materials you request, and you pay nothing but the shipping and handling costs. As long as the music is returned to us in NEW condition within 21 days, you are never charged. If you have specific titles you’d like to see, we will happily send those to you, or you can ask one of our knowledgeable staff members to select pieces for you based on concert theme, performance venue, type of group, etc.

What You Can Take On Trial (by department):

Choral, Handbell, Classroom General Music & Solo VocalYou may take up to 20 single copies of octavos and/or up to 5 musicals, collections, or director’s scores.

Band, Orchestra and InstrumentalYou may take up to six items on trial, including full arrangements, solos and chamber ensembles (only scores will be sent for titles appearing on the OMEA High School Large Group Contest List).

Piano/KeyboardUp to five collections and/or 10 teaching pieces, one copy each. Popular sheet music is not available for 21 Day Trial. 75% (by dollar amount) of the piano music on trial must be purchased.

For more details about our 21 Day Trial, visit us online at www.stantons.com, or give us a call at 1-800-42-MUSIC!

Click here for more information on the STANTON’S DIFFERENCE!


Why Does Copyright Law Matter? 01 June, 2016

copyrightrespectfully offered by Dan C., Orchestra Music Specialist

If you are reading this, you are probably a musician or associate with musicians. When you are a musician or hang with musicians, you begin to think that everyone is probably involved in music in one way or another. But, we musicians are really a fairly finite group of people.

It has been speculated that if you were to gather all people in the United States who make their living in the music industry (whether creating it, performing it, recording it, writing it, teaching it, publishing it, selling it, making and repairing instruments that play it etc), you would end up with about the same amount of people as are employed by the Kellogg’s Company – you know, the cereal and snack food folks. Yeah – a pretty finite group!

It seems unlikely that anyone involved in this tight-knit music community would intentionally keep their fellow musicians from trying to make a living. And yet, that’s what you do when you copy sheet music without permission. Sheet music is property – like a trumpet, violin or a microphone – but it’s intellectual property, which can be a bit nebulous. Basically, only the Copyright Holder has the “right” to “copy” their work. When you copy music without permission from the copyright holder, you are actually stealing it.

When you copy music without a second thought, that means the music is not being sold. Consequently, the music retailer and all their employees lose income, the music publisher and all their employees lose income, and, perhaps most tragically, the composer loses income. Your fellow musicians are being deprived of their ability to make a living.

So not only are you breaking the law by copying music, you are keeping your brothers and sisters in this finite musical community from doing what they love to do: be a musician. If they can’t make a living at it, they may have to leave and do something else. And the musical world becomes an even smaller place.

So don’t copy music without permission – it’s not only illegal, it’s immoral. Let’s make sure the livelihood of our music community is secure so we can all continue to make music – that thing we love to do!

For more information on what you can and cannot do when it comes to copyright, check out these books on the subject:
Copyright Basics by Joel Leach
The Teacher’s Guide to Music, Media, and Copyright Law by James Frankel
Music Copyright Law by Moser & Slay
Music Publishing: The Complete Guide by Steve Winogradsky

About the Author:
Dan C. has worked at Stanton’s since 1979, primarily with orchestra music and print promotions. A “working” musician, he’s a classical cellist, a rock & jazz bassist and a folk & country guitarist/singer. His free time is spent with family or reading, gardening, cycling and working puzzles. His series of musical puzzles (RP3 Rebus Puzzle Picture People) can be found on the Stanton’s Facebook page each Sunday. He also has a reputation as a pretty good joke teller. Seriously.


Stanton’s E-Tools: Jukebox 25 May, 2016

website Jukebox image for promoThe amazing staff at Stanton’s knows how valuable your time is. That’s why we try to provide you with as many tools as we can to make choosing music easier,  faster and more enjoyable. In this series of blog posts, we will be profiling our E-tools. Whether you are a local customer here in Columbus, OH or one of our many friends around the world, we hope you will find a way to use our E-tools!

As an extension of our Listening Library, we are proud to offer Stanton’s JukeboxStanton’s Jukebox is a specialized “wish list” where you can add sound samples from our Listening Library, then use it to:

  • Research your music purchases by building a playlist for all the titles you are considering, and then easily compare “apples to apples” as you listen.
  • Arrange your concert program by listening to full-length pieces in order, then rearranging as needed to allow for a variety in tempi and styles.
  • Build specific playlists for each of your different ensembles to assist you with your rehearsal planning and score study.
  • Generate a personalized URL for each playlist that can be emailed to your ensemble to enhance at-home practice – you can even add custom practice/rehearsal notes to appear with each playlist.
  • Forward your playlist to your school administrator or Booster/PTA president when you need to solicit funding for specific music.
  • Design separate playlists for different genres or eras of music for your Music History or Music Appreciation students to use during class or with homework.
  • Create a list of your favorite works for your personal listening pleasure in your home or office, and let it inspire you to continue strengthening your ensembles!

If you have questions about how to use the Stanton’s Jukebox feature, we also have a quick video tutorial that you can watch, as well as a list of “Frequently Asked Questions.” As always, if you need further information, feel free to call us at 1-800-42-MUSIC or email us at greatservice@stantons.com.

Click here for more in the Stanton’s E-Tools series!


The Stanton’s Difference: Setting Up Accounts Is Easy! 18 April, 2016

At Stanton’s, we know you have many choices when it comes to purchasing sheet music. Over the next few weeks, we want to take the opportunity to highlight just a few of the many reasons why Stanton’s is the best place to buy music for your school, church, private studio or personal use!

If you’re a school, church or community music director, your purchases are usually made to an account to be paid by your institution. If you are new to any of these positions, or have recently changed gigs, give us a call! We will be happy to provide you with your organization’s account number(s), and walk you through the billing process.

Are you new to shopping with Stanton’s? Rest easy – our staff can check to see if your organization already has an account (many often do), and if not, setting up a new account is easy! In fact, we can help you set up a new account when you place your first order, or make your first purchase, in a matter of minutes!

What we need:
– Name of the organization to be billed
– Billing address
– Billing phone number
– Purchase order number (if required by billing institution)

Let us know where you would like to have your order shipped, and you’re done!

Some notes:
*
Stanton’s can bill your: School Board/District; Church; School Building Activity Fund; Booster organization; Community Band/Choir organization

*We can assign multiple ship-to addresses and institutional credit cards to your account.

*You can bill orders to your account at our store, over the phone, at stantons.com, or at any conference or reading session where we’re exhibiting!

If you have any questions, give us a call at 1-800-42-MUSIC and speak with our sales staff, or press 4 to speak directly with our accounting department, and shop Stanton’s for all your sheet music needs!

Click here for more information on the STANTON’S DIFFERENCE!


Stanton’s E-Tools: Digital Delivery 08 April, 2016

digital deliveryThe amazing staff at Stanton’s knows how valuable your time is. That’s why we try to provide you with as many tools as we can to make choosing music easier, faster and more enjoyable! In this series of blog posts, we will be profiling our E-tools. Whether you are a local customer here in Columbus, OH or one of our many friends around the world, we hope you will find a way to use our E-tools!

It’s happened to all of us: You have a rehearsal or a performance coming up in a few days (or a few hours!) and you’ve lost your music; it’s they day before a competition, and your judges’ copies are nowhere to be found; you desperately need something new and fresh for your church choir to start on tonight. In many cases, Stanton’s Digital Delivery can come to your rescue!

Using the Digital Delivery website, you can purchase thousands of titles and print them at home on your home computer within minutes. In addition, many popular sheets (including pop, Broadway, country, etc) can be transposed to the key of your choosing, so you’ll always be able to have piece in a comfortable range for you. Lead lines can also be transposed for instruments such as trumpet, clarinet, saxophone and French horn. Many titles are available in convenient PDF format, so they’re ready to use right on your tablet!

You can access our Digital Delivery site directly by clicking here, where you can browse options for bands, orchestradigital delivery printers, choirs, and solos for many different instruments. You can also use the regular Stanton’s website, where titles available for Digital Delivery have a printer icon next to their descriptions. Clicking on that icon will take you directly to that item’s page on the Digital Delivery website, where you can purchase and print.

For questions about how to use the Stanton’s Digital Delivery Site, please feel free to give us a call at 1-800-42-MUSIC or visit us online or in person!

Click here for more in the Stanton’s E-Tools series!


THE FORCE AWAKENS for Strings 21 March, 2016

recommended by Dan Clark, Orchestra Specialist

String Orchestra Directors – has your Force Awakened?

Here are your best NEW options for “Star Wars” music for your Spring Orchestra Concert! All are expected to be off the press by the end of March.

STRING ORCHESTRA:
March of the Resistance arr. Paul Lavender (available NOW!)
This distinctive march theme gives string orchestras a terrific concert work that features skilled contrapuntal and fugal style writing. A challenging yet fun experience that mixes early Baroque and Classical style with the power and drama of Star Wars.

Star Wars: The Force Awakens – Soundtrack Highlights arr. James Kazik
James Kazik’s impressive montage spotlights the newest John Williams themes from the film soundtrack, plus the monumental Star Wars main theme. Includes: March of the Resistance; Rey’s Theme; Kylo Ren’s Theme; The Jedi Steps and Finale.

Star Wars Heroes arr. Jerry Brubaker (available NOW!)
This stunning medley arranged by Jerry Brubaker includes popular selections from many of the films. It features the ever recognizable and exciting “Star Wars (Main Title),” the lush and beautiful “Luke and Leia,” the action packed “Battle of the Heroes,” the emotional and lyrical “Han Solo and the Princess,” and to provide a fitting conclusion, the majestic “The Throne Room.”

Themes from Star Wars: The Force Awakens arr. Robert Longfield (available NOW!)
For developing string groups, this accessible medley includes all of the major Star Wars themes heard throughout the newest chapter, including: Star Wars Main Theme; March of the Resistance; Rey’s Theme; The Jedi Steps and Finale.

Rey’s Theme arr. Robert Longfield
Younger groups will love playing this new adventure theme from The Force Awakens. Truly a highlight of John Williams’ new score, “Rey’s Theme” gives a great sense of spirit, adventure, and fantasy that has become of key part of the continuing saga of Star Wars.

FULL ORCHESTRA:
Star Wars: The Force Awakens – Suite for Orchestra by John Williams
Includes 5 concert movements with performance options: I. March of the Resistance; II. Rey’s Theme; III. Scherzo for X-Wings; IV. The Jedi Steps (Concert Version); V. The Jedi Steps and Finale.

Star Wars: The Force Awakens – Soundtrack Suite arr. Sean O’Loughlin
This edition for educational groups brings the drama and beauty of John Williams’ newest film score to the stage for school orchestras. The Star Wars main theme is included, along with brilliant, engaging new music from the soundtrack: March of the Resistance; Rey’s Theme; Kylo Ren’s Theme; The Jedi Steps and Finale.

Selections from Star Wars: The Force Awakens arr. Johnnie Vinson (available NOW!)
From the blockbuster film, John Williams used familiar older themes along with dynamic new material in creating a truly memorable soundtrack. Here is a great sounding medley scored with flexible instrumentation and playable with just about any size ensemble. Featuring the following titles: The Jedi Steps and Finale, Main Title and The Attack on Jakku Village, March of the Resistance, and Rey’s Theme.

Looking for other Pop Music for String Orchestra? These are all off the press and ready for immediate delivery!
Hello arr. Larry Moore
Hey Jude arr. Larry Moore
Learn to Fly arr. Larry Moore
Shut Up and Dance arr. Larry Moore
Shut Up and Dance arr. Mike Story
Ticket to Ride arr. Larry Moore

About the Author:
Dan has worked at Stanton’s since 1979, primarily with orchestra music and print promotions. A “working” musician, he’s a classical cellist, a rock & jazz bassist and a folk & country guitarist/singer. His free time is spent with family or reading, gardening, cycling and working puzzles. His series of musical puzzles (RP3 Rebus Puzzle Picture People) can be found on the Stanton’s Facebook page each Sunday. He also has a reputation as a pretty good joke teller. Seriously.


Urban Music Education: A Practical Guide for Teachers 14 March, 2016

9780199778577Too often, urban music education is seen as “less than” its suburban counterpart. In Urban Music Education: A Practical Guide for Teachersauthor Kate Fitzpatrick-Harnish offers an important corrective that encourages music teachers to focus on students’ strengths as their primary resource. Through a combination of research-based strategies and practical suggestions, she highlights such issues as culturally relevant pedagogy, the “opportunity gap,” race, ethnicity, socioeconomic status, musical content, curricular change, program development, student motivation, and finding inspiration and support. Written for a wide variety of school and community settings, the book challenges all teachers who work in underresourced settings to tailor their pedagogy to meet students’ needs.

Author Kate Fitzpatrick-Harnish is Associate Professor of Music Education at the University of Michigan. An avid supporter of public school music programs, she is the former director of instrumental music at Northland High School in Columbus, Ohio.


NEW for String Orchestra! 30 November, 2015

recommended by Dan C., Orchestra Specialist

As you explore new music for your string orchestra, we trust that you will consider Stanton’s recommendations. You will find them on our mailed promotions, blog, e-blasts, and Stanton’s website: http://www.stantons.com.

Our staff reads through all the new music each year and picks the select few that we feel are educationally valid, provide interesting parts for everyone and will make good concert and festival repertoire. The larger publishers provide many options from which to choose and we always find good literature from among their offerings. The smaller publishers have fewer titles to present, but there are often some real gems among them which we like to point out to teachers who may have missed them in the plethora of publishers’ promotions.

Here are this year’s Stanton’s String Orchestra favorites from some smaller publishers in Grade Level order:

Criancas da Canoa (Canoe Children) – arr. Steven Frackenpohl
9013 – Grade 2 – Kendor Cadet Series – $48.00
Three lively Brazilian children’s songs with shared melodies.

Edge of Silence – Clarence Barber
50250094 – Grade 2 – Ludwig/Masters – $45.00
Slow tumble and flow will increase the maturity of any group.

Elephant’s Trumpet – Clarence Barber
50250097 – Grade 2 – Ludwig/Masters – $48.00
Cool String Bass section feature with “trumpeting” glissandi.

Escape – Kevin Sluder
GMMOR141 – Grade 2 – Grand Mesa Music – $50.00
Developing an intense theme with imitation and overlayments.

Nobody Knows the Trouble I’ve Seen – arr. David Bobrowitz
GMMOR134 – Grade 2 – Grand Mesa Music – $40.00
Emotional, unique setting of a tune said to have brought Lincoln to tears.

Theme with Academic Variations – arr. Jeffrey S. Bishop
3035321 – Grade 2 – Wingert-Jones – $45.00
Demonstrate the precision needed to perform a piece as perfectly as possible.

Down at the Farm – arr. James K. Taylor
GMMOR139 – Grade 3 – Grand Mesa Music – $50.00
Rakes of Mallow and Red Wing with fun, unexpected, imaginative surprises.

Pony Express – Brian Holmes
3035401 – Grade 3 – Wingert-Jones – $50.00
6/8 time and shifting harmonies capture the thrill of the Pony Express.

Brahms Hungarian Dance #1 – Brahms/arr. Frank Rodgers
SO334 – Grade 3-4 – MSB Publishing – $48.00
Slightly simplified, chromatic, G minor Hungarian Dance.

Perpetuoso – Brian Holmes
3035411 – Grade 3.5 – Wingert-Jones – $50.00
Perpetual motion piece with modern harmonies and groovy syncopation.

Diem Jubilate – Elliot Del Borgo
SO335 – Grade 5 – MSB Publishing – $65.00
A modern, challenging processional or impressive concert opener.

About the Author:
Dan C. has worked at Stanton’s since 1979, primarily with orchestra music and print promotions. A “working” musician, he’s a classical cellist, a rock & jazz bassist and a folk & country guitarist/singer. His free time is spent with family or reading, gardening, cycling and working puzzles. His series of musical puzzles (RP3 Rebus Puzzle Picture People) can be found on the Stanton’s Facebook page each Sunday. He also has a reputation as a pretty good joke teller. Seriously.


BEHIND THE SCENES: True Stories from Stanton’s 13 November, 2015

compiled by Dan C., Stanton’s resident staff jokester

qcBjqgxc5In the fall when school cranks back up, Stanton’s gets a huge increase in the number of phone calls and emails requesting all kinds of things. And with so many communications there is naturally an increase in requests, questions and comments that make you go, “Really?!?” Such as:

“I’ve got a high school brass trio that wants to go to Solo and Ensemble competition.
We’re in a state with no required list we have to follow.
The students want to play Johnny Cash’s Ring of Fire. Do you have that for brass trio?” [Really?!?]

“Do you know of any pieces for Alp Horn and Band?” [Really?!?]

“I need a copy of the piano piece Fur Elise by Beethoven – but I need it for harmonica!” [Really?!?]

sax_xmas_decWe’ve mentioned the escalating request in previous blogs. Here’s a recent one:
“I need music for a saxophone quartet” (Okay…)
“To be featured with a concert band” (Ummm…)
“On a Christmas piece!” (Yow!)

Then there are the ones that just make you scratch your head…

“I’m waiting as fast as I can for a Purchase Order number to come from our treasurer.” [How fast can you wait?!?]

“Do you folks carry trumpet muzzles?” [actually, what a great idea!]

Trying to read a teacher’s writing, a customer asked for the Hal Leonard “Interception” book. We knew he meant “Intermediate” and also figured he’s a football fan!

Recent email:
Customer Question – “I have an extensive collection of sheet music. Do you purchase at all?”
Stanton’s Reply – “WE have an extensive collection of sheet music. Do YOU purchase at all?”
After that tongue-in-cheek wisecrack, the employee then went on to explain a bit about how the retail sheet music business works.

Here are a few phone conversations:
Customer: “I found an item I need on your website. The catalog number is HB01”
Stanton’s employee, upon typing the number into the computer and finding that it is a very popular method book for horn by Fred Teuber: “Oh yes – the Teuber book.”
Customer: “No, I think it’s for French Horn!”

Customer with a pronounced southern accent: “I’m looking for Bob and Maria.” (at least that’s what it sounded like!)
Stanton’s employee: “I may not have heard you correctly – Bob and Maria?”
Customer: “No, A-V-E, Ave Maria.”
Stanton’s employee: “Oh, of course! I’m so sorry! Do you want the Bach/Gounod or the Schubert?” JeopardyCustomer: “Heck, I don’t know who writes ’em, I just play ’em!”

Let’s play Jeopardy…
The answer is:
“No sir, I don’t know which arrangement of Amazing Grace you just heard on the bus this morning.”
We’ll let you come up with the question! :)