News & Views Thursday, September 21, 2017

Category: Orchestra

Holidays with the Orchestra – Grade 0.5-2 14 September, 2017

recommended by Dan C., Orchestra Music Specialist

Brighten up the holiday section of your music library with these varied selections that can be worked up in plenty of time for your winter concert. There is lots of variety among these titles, from Christmas medleys, world music carols, classically composed winter music and more. Isn’t it time you chose some new literature? There’s an excellent selection of holiday pieces this year!

cfn-pas20-fChristmas Mash-Up arr. Larry Clark
Take lots of familiar Christmas tunes, mix them all together, and you have a Christmas Mash-Up. The setting is ideal for beginning players with the most difficult rhythm being a quarter note. This piece is perfect to highlight your first year orchestra at their very first holiday concert after as little as ten weeks of study.

Bells and Buccaneers arr. Deborah Baker Monday
What do you get when you combine pirate-like melodies and a student favorite holiday song? An instant hit for your beginners’ first winter concert! Lots of part doubling and unison rhythms for solid reinforcement, your students will feel confident and their parents will be bursting with pride upon hearing both Bells and Buccaneers! Plus your violins will get practice playing notes on their G string and using low “2.”

alfred-45818-fChant de Noel arr. Michael Story
The audience will know and love the tune, and may even know various names for it – “Sing We Now of Christmas,” “Noël Nouvelet,” “Christmas Comes Anew” or “Chant de Noël.” But what they won’t know is that your students have learned F and C natural, violins are playing E with the fourth finger instead of open and your orchestra has learned to pass off rhythms to each other. Optional triangle and shaker will add just the right touch of French Renaissance flavor to your performance.

Christmas In a Minute and a Half arr. Douglas E. Wagner
What would December concerts be without those familiar tunes that everyone loves to hear during that time of year? Here’s a medley arranged by Douglas E. Wagner of a baker’s dozen of some of the most recognized holiday tunes in the world, set in a fun, up-tempo style that is sure to be an audience hit. Even the violas get to play the melody!

grandm-gmmor192-fLos Peces en el Rio arr. Janelle Zook Cunalata
This arrangement was written to celebrate a popular Latin American Carol, “Los Peces en el Rio”, translated as, “Fish in the River.” In a nutshell, the song is about fish in a river that swim by Mary, Joseph and the newborn child, Jesus. The fish swim back and forth in the river hoping for a glimpse of the baby. The slurred eighth notes depict the fish swimming relentlessly, the staccato notes symbolize rain droplets, as fish would hear it underwater, and the Latin American Carol, “Los Peces en el Rio” is heard over the swimming and droplets. Enjoy the enchanting, minor tonality piece for string orchestra.

Sleigh Ride by Leopold Mozart/rr. Jan Farrar-Royce
Although the structure, notes, and dynamics are written by Leopold Mozart, arranger Jan Farrar-Royce takes the liberty of distributing the main themes among the sections of the string ensemble so that every player can enjoy being the horses who are trotting along, the rising and falling winter winds, and the passengers enjoying their ride.

Need more holiday options for your orchestra? Visit our website, or contact us! Shop Stanton’s for all your sheet music needs!

About the Author:
Dan C. has worked at Stanton’s since 1979, primarily with orchestra music and print promotions. A “working” musician, he’s a classical cellist, a rock & jazz bassist and a folk & country guitarist/singer. His free time is spent with family or reading, gardening, cycling and working puzzles. His series of musical puzzles (RP3 Rebus Puzzle Picture People) can be found on the Stanton’s Facebook page each Sunday. He also has a reputation as a pretty good joke teller. Seriously.


Top Choice Classics for Young String Orchestra 05 September, 2017

recommended by Dan C., Orchestra Music Specialist

Many string students realize quickly that their instruments lend themselves extremely well to classical music and they love to play it. Here are three winners of that genre that will not only satisfy their classical cravings, but will provide teaching moments galore, plus wonderfully melodic concert and adjudication repertoire.

wj-3035751-fFinale from Overture #5 by William Boyce/arr. David Giardiniere
We’ve not seen many string orchestra arrangements of Englishman William Boyce’s works, so this one provides a fresh change from the German and Italian Baroque masters. With a harpsichord part for authenticity (substitute an electronic keyboard with a harpsichord setting or a piano at last resort) the lower strings provide the figured bass anchor while the violins soar in close harmony, fitting a school orchestra extremely well. You get to contrast a Con Spirito D major with a Larghetto D minor and work on Baroque rhythms and ornaments for a glorious concert/adjudication addition.

Gavotte from Holberg Suite by Edvard Grieg/arr. Jan Farrar-Royce
Transcribed from the original piano version for string orchestra by the composer himself, this suite is a staple of string ensemble repertoire. Perfectly set for young players, this will become a classic for your library.

master-50250107-fBrandenburg Concerto #5 by J.S. Bach/arr. Lynne Latham
An absolute classic for strings, this version is in C major to avoid forward extensions for viola and cello. There is nothing out of first position except for a simple shift for cello and bass in a brief passage. A solo string quartet section gives the work a truly Baroque feel.

Find more classics for young string players on our website, or contact us at 1.800.426.8742 for more information. Shop Stanton’s for all your sheet music needs!

About the Author:
Dan C. has worked at Stanton’s since 1979, primarily with orchestra music and print promotions. A “working” musician, he’s a classical cellist, a rock & jazz bassist and a folk & country guitarist/singer. His free time is spent with family or reading, gardening, cycling and working puzzles. His series of musical puzzles (RP3 Rebus Puzzle Picture People) can be found on the Stanton’s Facebook page each Sunday. He also has a reputation as a pretty good joke teller. Seriously.


Curious About Copyright? 15 August, 2017

Find practical answers and information geared toward music educators and directors with the new COPYRIGHT HANDBOOK

by Ken Tilger, Band Education Specialist –

Copyright is a challenging but important subject in music education.  Most of us have a very limited understanding of it, and have had no formal training or education provided, yet it applies to every facet of being a music educator.  Literally meaning the right to copy or reproduce, copyright law is designed to protect creators from having their works essentially stolen rather than purchased.  Education has a very special caveat regarding copyright law, fair use, however, this does not mean unlimited use or reproduction.  While this special relationship complicates our understanding, it makes it all the more important to know what is permissible and do what is right.  Likewise, ever-changing digital technology and the internet make copyright that much more complicated and important.

Thankfully Alfred’s new Copyright Handbook for Music Educators and Directors provides us with a guide geared especially for the classroom and rehearsal hall.  Written by music education industry professionals, it provides a very practical approach to copyright law as it applies to performing musicians and teachers based on experience.  It is well laid out and easy-to-use, reasonably priced, and most importantly, directly applicable!  When you know better, you do better, so grab a copy and familiarize yourself with what you should and should not do – you might discover things that you can do that you never realized!  You might even find yourself helping your school or district to better operate within the law, and more importantly, set a good example for your students.

Copyright Handbook for Music Educators and Directors
Pam Phillips & Andrew Surmani
Alfred Publishing                                                                 $19.99
The Copyright Handbook for Music Educators and Directors provides a concise overview of the key aspects of copyright law that affect music educators and directors in the United States. Designed to provide answers to the most common questions raised by educators and directors, this resource makes it easy to find specific answers and is arranged in a user-friendly question-and-answer format. For ease of use, a thorough Glossary of Terms and an extensive Index are included. Not meant to replace legal counsel, the Copyright Handbook is a starting point for music educators and directors with questions concerning copyright. Topics: How to determine if a work is protected by copyright * The use of print music and lyrics * The use of audio * The use of video * Digital products and the Internet * Performance rights * Composing and arranging.

Also Available:
The Teacher’s Guide to Music, Media, and Copyright Law
Music Copyright Law

About the Author:
A former band director, Ken taught grade 5-12 band and music appreciation in both public and parochial schools in central Ohio, and joined the Stanton’s team in 2004. His iPod ranges from jazz and funk to classic and alternative rock, and symphonies.  Besides music, he geeks out on comic books, amusement parks, hockey (especially the Stanley Cup Champion Penguins), and all things Pittsburgh.


Gear Up for the New School Year 03 August, 2017

by Ken Tilger, Band Education Specialist –

The school year is almost upon us so I thought we might feature some of the most useful resources for improving and developing your band program.  From overall program development and administration, music teaching, and conducting, to the National Standards, classroom management, and working productively with your booster organization, these titles touch on almost every aspect of being a band director.  Pick up 1 or 2 of these to recharge before the school year starts, or use them as guides to implement small changes over the year.  Either way they are sure to provide new insights, ideas, and resources to make your school year smoother and your program better.

Habits of a Successful Band Director
In Habits of a Successful Band Director, Scott Rush provides a how-to book for young teachers, a supplement for college methods classes, a common-sense approach to everyday problems band directors face, sequential models for instruction that are narrow in scope, and more.  Some of the topics covered in the ten chapters include: classroom organization and management, working with parents and colleagues, the importance of the warm-up, rehearsal strategies, selecting high-quality literature, and student leadership.

Habits of a Successful Middle School Band Director
Building on the successful Habits series, Scott Rush and his team have created a practical guide to all aspects of the middle school band program, including, recruiting for beginners, mouthpiece testing and instrumentation, running an effective middle school rehearsal, teaching strategies for middle school, repertoire suggestions, warm-ups for beginner, intermediate, and advanced middle school players  Additional sections address musicianship, classroom management, working with parents and colleagues, assessment, technology, the middle school mind, minor instrument repair, private lessons…even traveling with middle school students.

Developing the Complete Band Program
This book is a unique resource for both novice and experienced band directors, gathering effective teaching tools from the best in the field. Includes more than 40 chapters on: curriculum, then and now of North American wind bands, the anatomy of music making, motivation, program organization and administrative leadership, and much more. A wonderful resource for all music educators! Dr. Jagow’s book is comprehensive and impressive in scope.

National Core Arts Standards in Secondary Music Ensembles
This practical, 96-page resource provides detailed information to ease understanding and implementation of the 2014 National Core Arts Standards in secondary music ensembles. Each artistic process in the standards – creating, performing, responding, and connecting – is explored through examples of day-to-day rehearsal activities and a sample cornerstone assessment that is ready for class use.

 

** NEW **
Boosters to the Rescue!

Veteran band director David Vandewalker has been successfully empowering school parent organizations across the country for years. In Boosters to the Rescue! he offers practical tools to modernize your program into a 21st-century booster organization that can function as a successful small business and significantly support the school music and arts programs. In clear, concise language Vandewalker lays out an action plan that includes how to learn to be articulate in sharing your vision; enlist an army of volunteers; develop project plans; define a composite list of duties, tasks, and responsibilities; communicate; create a business plan model; and more.

** NEW **
Strategic Plans for a Successful Booster Club

Strategic Plans for a Successful Booster Club is the companion resource to Boosters to the Rescue!, which provides ready-to-use Word, Excel, and PDF files to help booster clubs set and achieve a long-term vision for their organization. Strategic Plans includes project-planning guides for three diverse sizes of booster clubs: Developing, Growing, and Maximizing. Strategic Plans offers a wealth of ideas, forms, organizational charts, and branding tools in four concise sections: “Ready, Set, and Go!” introduces the strategic planning process and explains how to get down to business. “Rally the Troops” provides practical advice on how to organize, manage, and empower people. “Roll It Out” delves into the details of creating a business plan blueprint and a project-planning guide. And “Rock It Out” includes ways to build effective teams, with dozens of branding and advertising designs ready for you to download, edit, customize, and print.

** NEW **
The Conductor’s Companion: 100 Rehearsal Techniques, Imaginative Ideas, Quotes, and Facts
100 outstanding middle and high school, collegiate and professional band and orchestra conductors passionately and candidly share their most powerful rehearsal techniques and cutting-edge program ideas in this concise and inspirational volume. Also included are fascinating historical facts about famous composers and conductors as well as inspirational quotes ideal for advocating music programs. It’s an excellent university supplemental text and a “go-to” source for directors at all levels.

Classroom Management in the Music Room
Classroom Management in the Music Room: Pin-Drop Quiet Classes and Rehearsals is a resource vital to any productive music classroom. Designed with simplicity in mind – simple to teach, simple to learn, and simple to administer – this book promotes student-centered self-discipline and turns classroom management into creating music.

Don’t Forget These!
Handy Manual Fingering Charts
Complete Instrumental Reference Guide

About the Author:
A former band director, Ken taught grade 5-12 band and music appreciation in both public and parochial schools in central Ohio, and joined the Stanton’s team in 2004. His iPod ranges from jazz and funk to classic and alternative rock, and symphonies.  Besides music, he geeks out on comic books, amusement parks, hockey (especially the Stanley Cup Champion Penguins), and all things Pittsburgh.


Expressive Programmatic Pieces for Strings – Grade 1.5-2.5 14 June, 2017

recommended by Dan C., Orchestra Music Specialist

Get your young string players performing with maturity beyond their years!

Smaster-50250102-faluda River Waltz by Andrew Balent
Waltzes are always gentle crowd pleasers and teaching moments abound in this one as you float gently downstream. Work on subdividing for dotted quarter/eighth rhythms and getting C naturals in tune. As with many waltzes, the violins get most of the melodic action while the other parts drive the important 3/4 waltz lilt.

Adoration by Bud Woodruff
Bud Woodruff has come into his own this year with several wonderful compositions from Grade 1½ to Grade 3. As a retired teacher in Deerpark, Texas, he has taken his years of experience “in the trenches” and offered up pieces that really work for young players. Here he gives an uplifting, aural depiction of the feelings of infatuation with generously shared melodic material and harmonic twists. Lessons in rhythm are included with offbeats and accents and he keeps students on their toes by including the notes Bb, D#, and F. Plus the work has audience appeal aplenty. An all-around winner.

cfn-yas150-fHeartstrings by Larry Clark
Give your unsung second violins the spotlight at the beginning as they introduce the melody. Beautiful harmonies are emotionally enhanced with Bb, Eb, C# and F natural accidentals in the key of G. Heartstrings is dedicated to the memory of a young man who died tragically in a climbing accident as well as any loved ones we have all lost. By bringing to mind the love that we have for our close friends and family members, it will pull on your heartstrings – love with a touch of sadness. Certain harmonic choices and dissonances in the melody to the harmonies were used to bring about this emotional feeling. In the hope of stretching young people’s musicianship you can ask them to put their emotions into the music by stretching the phrasing, pushing lines, and giving things shape; make the music more than what is on the page. Bring it to life and make the audience feel something with their performance. Inspire your students to do so and expand their musical horizons.

wj-3035501-fA Million Miles Away by Francis J. Caravella
What better than the Lydian mode to depict the vast reaches of outer space? You can not only teach your students about modes, but can also talk about dissonance, bow control, and dynamics. Everyone’s part is necessary and propulsive, so no boredom here! A Million Miles Away is very “grown-up” sounding, but certainly accessible. You might even say it’s out of this world!

Farewell to a Friend by Susan H. Day
You can count on Susan Day to use her expressive and extensive talents to pull emotion out of your players and your listeners while providing a teaching vehicle with which to do it. Composed in memory of a beloved orchestra conductor, she offers legato bowing, arpeggios, expression, syncopation, sweet countermelodies and accompaniments as ways to not only bring tears to the eyes of the audience, but also to teach these concepts to add to your students’ musicality.

Find more programmatic pieces for strings on our website, or contact us for more information. Shop Stanton’s for all your sheet music needs!

About the Author:
Dan C. has worked at Stanton’s since 1979, primarily with orchestra music and print promotions. A “working” musician, he’s a classical cellist, a rock & jazz bassist and a folk & country guitarist/singer. His free time is spent with family or reading, gardening, cycling and working puzzles. His series of musical puzzles (RP3 Rebus Puzzle Picture People) can be found on the Stanton’s Facebook page each Sunday. He also has a reputation as a pretty good joke teller. Seriously.


Habits of a Successful Orchestra Director 05 June, 2017

recommended by Dan C., Orchestra Music Specialist

Attention Orchestra Teachers – new or seasoned veterans – a must for your Summer Reading!

gia-g9363-fHABITS OF A SUCCESSFUL ORCHESTRA DIRECTOR
Christopher Selby, edited by Scott Rush
G9363 – $29.95
A resource rich with practical strategies and fresh ideas about teaching orchestra students of all ages.

* Creating a culture of success with rehearsal strategies, classroom policies and the structuring of class time
* Students becoming orchestra leaders and taking greater pride and ownership of their ensemble
* Tips for building your program, long range planning, assessment of improvement
* Communicating with parents and administration to better support the orchestra
* Performing with refined intonation, rhythmic precision and a beautiful tone
* Sight reading better, rehearsing more efficiently in class and practicing better at home
* Teaching of left hand position, vibrato and shifting; right hand set up and trouble shooting
* And much more!

About the Author:
Dan C. has worked at Stanton’s since 1979, primarily with orchestra music and print promotions. A “working” musician, he’s a classical cellist, a rock & jazz bassist and a folk & country guitarist/singer. His free time is spent with family or reading, gardening, cycling and working puzzles. His series of musical puzzles (RP3 Rebus Puzzle Picture People) can be found on the Stanton’s Facebook page each Sunday. He also has a reputation as a pretty good joke teller. Seriously.


Music Major Graduation Gifts – String Players 03 May, 2017

The world of a musician or collegiate music major is often foreign and strange to those outside of the profession. Parents, family and friends are often at a loss as to what graduation gifts might be most useful to high school graduates who plan to major in music, or college graduates pursuing music as a profession. The members of our knowledgeable staff at Stanton’s have all been in their shoes, and we recommend these gifts (in a variety of price ranges) that WE could have used when we graduated!

For HIGH SCHOOL GRADUATES studying string instruments in college:

so you want to be a music majorSo You Want To Be a Music Major by Robert Franzblau, $14.99
There’s a famous story about a music professor who looked at his or her entry level theory class of bright-eyed freshman on the first day and said, “Look to your left. Now look to your right. One of these people won’t be here by the end of the semester.” Success as a music major depends greatly on a number of factors, sometimes the least of which is talent or ability. Go in prepared with this book about how to make a successful transition from high school musician to collegiate music student.

Harvard Dictionary of Music, $54.50
We know, we know, there’s an app for that. Sometimes, though, you can’t beat an old fashioned reference book. This is the standard against which all other music dictionaries are measured, and every professional has one on their shelves.

strings attachedStrings Attached by Joanne Lipman & Melanie Kupchynsky, $24.99
Every college student has a crisis moment when they wonder “What did I get myself into? I can’t do this! It’s too much!” Give them an inspiring story to read in this moment of self-doubt. Jerry Kupchynsky, known as Mr. K, was a Ukrainian-born taskmaster who yelled and stomped and screamed, and who drove his students harder than anyone had ever driven them before. Through sheer force of will, he made them better than they had any right to be. Strings Attached tells the inspiring, poignant, and powerful story of this remarkable man, whose life seemed to conspire against him at every turn and yet who was able to transform his own heartache into triumph for his students.

For COLLEGE GRADUATES becoming string teachers:

Teaching Music Through Performance in Orchestra series, $39.50-$49.50
These books are the go-to resource for quality orchestral literature at all levels. The books are a wealth of information, and the accompanying CD sets have high quality recordings of each featured piece. While a worthwhile investment, they can be out of reach for those on a first-year teacher’s salary. Available titles include Teaching Music Through Performance in Orchestra Vol. 1, 2 & 3. Books and CD sets sold separately.

habits of a successful orchestra directorHabits of a Successful Orchestra Director by Christopher Selby, $29.95
This resource is rich with practical strategies for developing a successful orchestra program. This book will inspire young and veteran orchestra directors looking for fresh ideas about teaching students of all ages to: perform with refined intonation, expressive musicianship, and a beautiful tone; develop advanced performance technique, rhythmic precision, and ensemble skills; sight-read better, rehearse more efficiently in class, and practice better at home; and become orchestra leaders and take greater pride and ownership in your ensemble.

Help your graduate build their reference library with these other fantastic resources!
Strategies for Teaching Strings, $76.95
Orchestral Bowings and Routines, $21.99
String Teaching in America: Strategies for a Diverse Society, $22.99
ASTA (American String Teachers Association) Curriculum, $49.99
String Clinics To Go: Art of Recruiting DVD, $34.95
String Clinics To Go: Getting Started DVD, $34.95

Don’t forget to give your graduate Stanton’s phone number: 1-800-42-MUSIC! Our staff is a great resource with music knowledge and teaching experience, and full of ideas!


Uplifting Programmatic Pieces for Strings – Grade 0.5-1.5 12 April, 2017

recommended by Dan C., Orchestra Music Specialist

Inspire your beginners and their audience with these winners!

cfn-pas15-fOath of Honor by Larry Clark
Perfect as a concert opener for first timers, Oath of Honor is a super easy yet majestic piece that should bring about the feeling of pride with its ceremonial and celebratory nature. It is written for the youngest of students in mind with minimal notes, block scoring and simple repeated eighth-note rhythms. The modern harmonies put it a cut above other pieces at this level and will “stretch the ears” of your students in a very good way. There is also a great teaching opportunity with an empty beat “1” so don’t miss this one!

Presto by Robert Sheldon
Grab your beginners when they are freshly excited and get them to show their spirit and enthusiasm with this joyful and fast-paced gem. With a simple 5-note theme ,it has repeated eighth notes in constant rhythm patterns with the focus generously shared among everyone. The students will have a blast and so will their audience.

fjh-st6393-fJubilee Fanfare by Soon Hee Newbold
Experience the sounds and celebrations of an ancient festival in this fantastic concert opener. Inspired by Celtic dances and the drones of an ancient stringed instrument called the hurdy-gurdy, this energetic work, with generously shared melody, will be a huge hit with your students and audience. Plus you can use it to teach marcato bowing, the mixolydian mode, snap pizzicato plus Bb and F natural.

Marble Falls Rondo by Bud Woodruff
Honoring Arkansas’ contribution to the marble for the Washington Monument, this flowing programmatic work gives every section melodic material and activity. There is a quirky middle section for violas and cellos that will bring smiles. Teaching elements include setting the bow, feeling 4/4 in a slow cut time and C natural accidentals.

alfred-44837-fA Spark of Courage by Doug Spata
What a great way to open or close a young orchestra’s concert. A modern & joyful gem using only the notes of the D major scale, it will not only exude a sense of honor and duty, it will also help teach staccato bowing, counting rhythmic rests, and keeping a steady 8th note pulse. Plus there is plenty of activity for everyone that is passed back and forth so no one will say “I’m bored!”

Our Heroes by Susan H. Day
A moving tribute to all the people in our lives we admire as role models, here is a soul-stirring selection that will make everyone proud. Excellent for smaller or younger groups since second violin doubles viola and bass doubles cello. Teaching elements include using long, full bows, the D.S. al Coda concept, and low second finger in the first violins.

You can find more options for young string players on our website, or contact us for even more repertoire ideas. Shop Stanton’s for all your sheet music needs!

About the Author:
Dan C. has worked at Stanton’s since 1979, primarily with orchestra music and print promotions. A “working” musician, he’s a classical cellist, a rock & jazz bassist and a folk & country guitarist/singer. His free time is spent with family or reading, gardening, cycling and working puzzles. His series of musical puzzles (RP3 Rebus Puzzle Picture People) can be found on the Stanton’s Facebook page each Sunday. He also has a reputation as a pretty good joke teller. Seriously.


STAR WARS UPDATE: Orchestra Edition 15 March, 2017

recommended by Dan C., Orchestra Music Specialist

May the Force Be With Your String Players… 
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HIT MAKERS for Orchestra 24 February, 2017

recommended by Dan C., Orchestra Music Specialist

Hot new arrangements of pop hits that span the decades!

leon-04491743-fVictorious arr. Larry Moore, Grade 3-4
Recorded by pop group Panic! At the Disco, this hit tune features a strong melody and a driving pulse…an uplifting anthem for any ensemble, team, or celebration event.

Can’t Stop the Feeling arr. Larry Moore, Grade 3-4
Justin Timberlake is back with a sizzling new track that’s heating up YouTube and the airwaves. Its catchy pop hooks and pounding dance groove make it a student player must-have.

Hello arr. Larry Moore, Grade 3-4
Adele’s heartbreaking ballad from her 2015 album is a standout hit and has been heard all over radio and television.

leon-04626439-fHey Jude arr. Larry Moore, Grade 3-4
“Hey Jude” was The Beatles’ longest charting hit – it was at #1 on the Billboard charts for nine weeks in 1968. Surely your students deserve only the best!

Learn to Fly arr. Larry Moore, Grade 3-4
Bright riff rocker from Seattle’s Foo Fighters flew up the charts in 1999. Now your string orchestra can “Learn to Fly!”

Shut Up and Dance arr. Mike Story, Grade 2
Very playable version of fun, rhythmic power-pop from Ohio’s own Walk the Moon – it peaked at #4 on the Billboard charts.

Shut Up and Dance arr. Larry Moore, Grade 3-4
The band, Walk the Moon, had this catchy power pop hit all over the radio in 2015. With members from Columbus and Cincinnati, they do Ohio proud!

alfred-43791-fStarlight arr. Sasha Ivanov & Derek Stein, Grade 3.5
Vitamin String Quartet’s actual hard-charging version of Muse’s modern rock tune with an added bass part. Your students can work on reading rock rhythms with their syncopation, offbeat accents, triplets, grace notes and accidentals. The cellos and basses lay down a solid foundation for everyone else to build on. It’s an authentically rockin’ rendition that will be most impressive when polished. Top notch!

Ticket to Ride arr. Larry Moore, Grade 3-4
Yet another of the many No. 1 hits of the Beatles in 1964 as they transformed popular music forever. Now arranged for strings, it features all the elements of a classic song…melodic hooks, harmonies and a pop style that appeals to everyone.

You can find more orchestra pop hits on our website, or contact us for even more repertoire ideas. Shop Stanton’s for all your sheet music needs!

About the Author:
Dan C. has worked at Stanton’s since 1979, primarily with orchestra music and print promotions. A “working” musician, he’s a classical cellist, a rock & jazz bassist and a folk & country guitarist/singer. His free time is spent with family or reading, gardening, cycling and working puzzles. His series of musical puzzles (RP3 Rebus Puzzle Picture People) can be found on the Stanton’s Facebook page each Sunday. He also has a reputation as a pretty good joke teller. Seriously.


“Festival Rondo” for Multi-Level Strings 15 February, 2017

recommended by Dan C., Orchestra Music Specialist

Almost every spring, I speak with some school system somewhere wanting to program a HUGE combined concert featuring their elementary, middle and high school string orchestras. Up until now, it has been hard to recommend something that will work in that situation. Leave it to the inimitable Richard Meyer to solve the problem! “Festival Rondo” is the perfect energetic closer to an “All City” multi-level concert. Combining three levels of string orchestra (and yes, there is a harp part too) with plenty of parts for everyone, each of the three levels gets featured at some point during the piece. There are a couple of key changes and some accidentals, but nothing your groups can’t handle by the end of the school year. It’s an entertaining extravaganza!

Contact us for more recommendations for combined string ensembles, or visit our website to shop Stanton’s for ALL your sheet music needs!

About the Author:
Dan C. has worked at Stanton’s since 1979, primarily with orchestra music and print promotions. A “working” musician, he’s a classical cellist, a rock & jazz bassist and a folk & country guitarist/singer. His free time is spent with family or reading, gardening, cycling and working puzzles. His series of musical puzzles (RP3 Rebus Puzzle Picture People) can be found on the Stanton’s Facebook page each Sunday. He also has a reputation as a pretty good joke teller. Seriously.


Uplifting Programmatic Pieces for Strings – Grade 3-3.5 03 February, 2017

recommended by Dan C., Orchestra Music Specialist

Capture some excitement with these original, spirited, modern compositions!

Blue Mountain by Alexander Safford
Here is a sure way to add excitement to any concert. With the half note=90 in cut time and lots of syncopation and offbeat accents, it is full of vitality. One of the challenges will be keeping the drive going even at softer dynamics. It has a split cello part that adds one more inner layer of involvement and also occasionally offers an optional doubling of the viola part if you need it. The whole piece is a refreshing melodic & rhythmic jolt of upbeat, spirited energy!

Danse Carnivale by Randall Standridge
Useable as a great concert opener, finale or even an encore, Danse Carnivale is a “throwback” inspired by can-cans, galops and quick-steps. Every part has an essential, connected role, tumbling through dramatic changes in tempi, style & dynamics with the quarter note=160. Viva la Carnivale!

On the Pilgrim’s Road by Jeffrey S. Bishop
Capture the excitement of going to Jerusalem in centuries past. You can imagine the pilgrims as they struggle in those ancient times on their way to the Holy Land. The music is full of exciting rhythms contrasted with solemnity, 6/8 vs 3/4, percussive string effects, strums and solemnico style markings. All parts are enjoyably active and essential, so everyone will be kept busy. Different & interesting.

You can find more programmatic options for orchestra on our website, or contact us for personalized recommendations for your ensemble. Shop Stanton’s for all your sheet music needs!

About the Author:
Dan C. has worked at Stanton’s since 1979, primarily with orchestra music and print promotions. A “working” musician, he’s a classical cellist, a rock & jazz bassist and a folk & country guitarist/singer. His free time is spent with family or reading, gardening, cycling and working puzzles. His series of musical puzzles (RP3 Rebus Puzzle Picture People) can be found on the Stanton’s Facebook page each Sunday. He also has a reputation as a pretty good joke teller. Seriously.


Expressive Programmatic Pieces for Strings – Grade 3 20 January, 2017

recommended by Dan C., Orchestra Music Specialist

The perfect, mellow contrast to more vigorous repertoire!

Smooth Sailing by Thom Sharp
Written in a comfortable “movie music” format with ever-shifting styles covering beauty, grace, wit and romanticism, Thom Sharp has created an excellent Spring Concert piece that will help teach or reinforce expressive shifting, vibrato, harmonics, and subdivision to your students. Everyone has active parts that all synchronize lushly for a relaxing treat perhaps between more vigorous pieces. Aaah!

Fleetwing by Doug Spata
Doug Spata is one of those composers whose works always sparkle. This soaring overture shimmers with accents, syncopation, and grace notes while teaching your students independence as the melodies pass fluidly between sections and the accompaniments parts are just plain fun! It is impressively challenging with satisfying results.

Daybreak by Bud Woodruff
While experiencing this beautiful work, your group’s maturity will evolve like the dawn. Everyone has active, essential parts to keep them musically busy with lots of call and response, syncopation and essential accidentals used to help denote the sunrise as it slowly builds to a fully lighted extravaganza. The piece is sprinkled with solos, so it’s an excellent lesson in keeping the soloists to the fore while playing background parts too. De-light-ful!

She Will Hang the Night with Stars by William Hofeldt
Reminiscent of his Lullaby, The Gift, and Nocturne, here is William Hofeldt at his best with a gorgeous interpretation of a poignant Oscar Wilde poem. Some of Hofeldt’s more recent compositions have been a tad long or too difficult for many school groups, but this one is right in the pocket and positively radiant. With some shifting in upper divisi parts and some accidentals, it will mine the depth of your pupils’ abilities with independent parts that are beautifully active. Nice to have a new Hofeldt piece that most people will savor.

Find more music for orchestra on our website, or contact us for personalized sheet music recommendations!

About the Author:
Dan C. has worked at Stanton’s since 1979, primarily with orchestra music and print promotions. A “working” musician, he’s a classical cellist, a rock & jazz bassist and a folk & country guitarist/singer. His free time is spent with family or reading, gardening, cycling and working puzzles. His series of musical puzzles (RP3 Rebus Puzzle Picture People) can be found on the Stanton’s Facebook page each Sunday. He also has a reputation as a pretty good joke teller. Seriously.


Orchestra “Alternatives” 09 January, 2017

recommended by Dan C., Orchestra Music Specialist

A touch of rock, country, folk and ragtime, just perfect for your young players’ Spring Concert!

Fiddling Farmers arr. Carrie Lane Gruselle, Grade 1
The farmer is celebrated fiddle-style in this trio of folk songs: “Old McDonald, “The Farmer in the Dell,” and “Oats, Peas, Beans, and Barley Grow.” Various eighth note patterns will provide wonderful training for the right hand. While expanding their bow length with the legato long-short-short pattern, young string players are also performing a great number of bow lifts or retakes to develop their control of bow placement.

Pizzicato Fizz by Steven Rosenhaus, Grade 1
Based on a 12-bar blues pattern, this playful string work for first or second year players will thoroughly engage young players and give them a fine piece for a successful early performance; all notes for strings are played either with open strings or with first finger. As the title indicates, the string parts are played pizzicato, and a non-optional piano part lays down a solid rock groove. Enjoy this super-fun, easy string work with your students!

Rosintown Rock by Benjamin P. Snoek, Grade 1.5
This fun alternative-style original works great with beginning strings and sounds much harder than it is. Students will love the energetic rock beat! The suggested drum part really drives the piece.

Simple Gifts arr. Carrie Lane Gruselle, Grade 2
Lighthearted and energetic, this arrangement ofSimple Gifts suggests a dance-like character. With its familiar and captivating tune supported by a gentle but persistent underlying rhythmic motif, students will study balance of sound, staccato and legato bowing styles. Very playable and creatively arranged, it has interesting, active parts for everyone.

Cakewalk Strut by Carl Strommen, Grade 2
The “Cakewalk”, also known as the “Walkaround” or “Prize Walks,” was a late nineteenth-century Southern dance form set to the infectious, even eighth-note pulse of Ragtime. A partner dance, judges would evaluate the elegant bearing of the men, the gracefulness of the women and the inventiveness of the pair of dancers. The last remaining pair (“winners”) would often be presented with an elaborately decorated cake. This strut is perfect for string orchestras that have an abundance of upper strings. The top three voices carry most of the action while the cellos and basses anchor the “ooh-pahs” under the syncopated Ragtime rhythms. A great lesson in subdivision, with the emphasis on the “and” of the beat, there are handy accents to capture the rhythmic feel as well as bow lifts and ties. Second violins get a crucial D# on the D string too.

Find more novelties for strings on our website, or contact us – we’ll be happy to help you find the perfect new piece for your ensemble! And remember to shop Stanton’s for all your sheet music needs!

About the Author:
Dan C. has worked at Stanton’s since 1979, primarily with orchestra music and print promotions. A “working” musician, he’s a classical cellist, a rock & jazz bassist and a folk & country guitarist/singer. His free time is spent with family or reading, gardening, cycling and working puzzles. His series of musical puzzles (RP3 Rebus Puzzle Picture People) can be found on the Stanton’s Facebook page each Sunday. He also has a reputation as a pretty good joke teller. Seriously.


Classic Repertoire for More Advanced String Orchestra 08 December, 2016

recommended by Dan C., Orchestra Music Specialist

The cream-of-the-crop of this year’s Baroque, Classical and Romantic pieces in outstanding educational arrangements.

Concerto in D for Strings by Telemann/arr. Steven Frackenpohl, Grade 3
Telemann can always provide concert sparkle as his music falls in the cusp between Baroque and Classical. Everyone has active parts: the higher parts have more flash, while the lower parts ground the piece with rolling basso continuo. There is chromaticism, on-the-string 16ths and rhythmic drive – just what you want from Telemann.

Allegro Spiritoso (from Divertimento #8, K213) by W.A. Mozart/arr. Marcia Stockton, Grade 3
A natural piece for string orchestra, this effervescent movement from Divertimento #8, K213, originally for wind sextet, will keep everyone spiritedly on their toes. With its Classical style, chromaticism and 16th note pickups, it is marvelous Mozart all the way!

Lady Radnor’s Suite: Slow Minuet by Sir Hubert Parry/arr. Robert Sieving, Grade 3
Sir Hubert Parry was influenced by Wagner, Brahms and Mendelssohn and passed on his passion to students such as Holst, Vaughan Williams & Frank Bridge. This movement would be excellent for smaller chamber groups where you can polish a sense of ensemble, concentrate on color, timbre and balance and encourage an artfully elegant, mature sound.

Symphony #104 Finale by F.J. Haydn/arr. Todd Parrish, Grade 3.5
The sparkle of this masterwork is undeniable. This exuberant finale, masterfully arranged, is Haydn at his best. As is typical of Haydn, the melody is in the upper strings and the harmony in the lower, but it is still an excellence teaching piece for everyone on the classical style, bow technique, shifting and dynamics.

Presto (from Symphony #1) by F.J. Haydn/arr. Robert D. McCashin, Grade 4
This spirited opening movement of Haydn’s First Symphony would actually make a fantastic closer for any high school performance! It demonstrates his substantial range of invention, organization of thought, musical ideas, and inventive compositional prowess at a young age. The movement is full of rhythmic and harmonic surprises and though the violins get the melodic action, the other parts drive it, so everyone is kept plenty busy. Use it to teach 16th note scales, dynamic extremes and accidentals on G#, D# and A#.

Intermezzo (from Carmen) by Georges Bizet/arr. John Caponegro, Grade 4
To provide an “ahh” factor to any high school concert, choose this glorious, flowing operatic gem from a master of melody. Incorporating triplets, grace notes, shifting and plenty of rubato, your basses will solidly anchor it while everyone else glimmers.

You can find more orchestra classics on our website, or contact us for recommendations especially for your ensemble. Shop Stanton’s for all your sheet music needs!

About the Author:
Dan C. has worked at Stanton’s since 1979, primarily with orchestra music and print promotions. A “working” musician, he’s a classical cellist, a rock & jazz bassist and a folk & country guitarist/singer. His free time is spent with family or reading, gardening, cycling and working puzzles. His series of musical puzzles (RP3 Rebus Puzzle Picture People) can be found on the Stanton’s Facebook page each Sunday. He also has a reputation as a pretty good joke teller. Seriously.


Join us at The Midwest Clinic! 08 December, 2016

midwest-clinic-mastheadby Ken Tilger, Band Education Specialist –

Stanton’s Sheet Music is excited to be exhibiting at The Midwest Clinic for our third consecutive year on December 14-16, 2016!

Join band specialists Kent White, Ken Tilger, and Kris Lehman, “The Jazz Guy” Ben Huntoon, as well as technology guru/computer ninja David Ginter and Stanton’s Sheet Music President Eric Strouse at McCormick Place, Booth #1227. Browse and shop hundreds of titles for wind band, orchestra, jazz ensemble, and solo & ensemble, gift items, and more while taking advantage of their combined 100+ years of sheet music expertise. Trivia and useless knowledge provided free of charge!

We look forward to seeing you in Chicago!

The Lowdown
The Midwest Clinic
December 14-16, 2016
McCormick Place
Chicago, IL

Booth #1227

Exhibit Hall Hours:
Wednesday, 9:30 am – 5:00 pm
Thursday, 9:00 am – 5:00 pm
Friday, 9:00 am – 4:00 pm

About the Author:
Ken is a former band director, and has been with Stanton’s since 2004.  Besides music, he geeks out on comic books, amusement parks, hockey, and all things Pittsburgh.  He’s excited to get NHLTV for Christmas so he can watch the Penguins – Let’s Go Pens!


World Music for Orchestra 18 November, 2016

recommended by Dan C., Orchestra Music Specialist

Visit Asia, Central and South America without leaving the orchestra room!

Kon’nichiwa by Keiko Yamada, Grade 0.5
“Kon’nichiwa” is the Japanese word that loosely translates to hello. It is a Japanese word that many students will be familiar with. It was chosen for this piece in particular, because it is an introductory level piece for very young students who are just learning to play their instruments, and because it is a friendly hello to the performers and audiences. The piece is based on the pentatonic scale and uses limited eighth-note rhythms. A happy main theme is contrasted by the more legato and lyrical second theme that should be lush and full sounding. It is very tuneful, with pleasant harmonies and it keeps everyone busy, which is ideal for beginners. You can adjust the tempo to whatever you think will work best for your students. If you are smiling when you play this piece, then you are doing it right. Have fun!

Ninja by Richard Meyer, Grade 1
There’s a ninja on the loose and he’s sneaking through the orchestra. But not for long! Your students will love making up storylines for what happens next in this colorful Asian-flavored piece that uses only the notes of the D Major scale. There are plenty of great teaching opportunities here for your first-year students, including pizzicato, accents, crescendos, and melody/accompaniment balance. Fun for everyone!

Takeda No Komoriuta by Keiko Yamada, Grade 2
This popular and beautiful Japanese folk song is a lullaby, but rather than it being a quiet, gentle song to put a child to sleep, it is sung by the girl Takeda to soothe herself through a difficult situation. The goal of the composer was to bring out its pensive nature and to offer the haunting E minor pentatonic tune in a variety of presentations. Although slow, there is lots of movement in everyone’s part. The violas state the melody at the beginning over drones in the lower strings, with pizzicato in the upper strings emulating a Japanese stringed instrument known as the koto. This is followed by a lush and lyrical statement with thick harmonies while the first violins carry the tune. The cellos then add arpeggiated chords along with a harmonized version of the melody in the second violins. The cellos are then given the melody with a new harmonic presentation by the other strings in parallel motion. This all builds to the climatic statement of the song one last time that leads to a dramatic pause on an extended chord, which then subdues to a short coda to complete the work. Expressive and gorgeous.

C Here by Seth Gamba, Grade 2
Based on the Brazilian baiao rhythm, this work serves to reinforce the difference between the high two and low two fingering patterns (the first on the D string and the second on the A string). It is a fun-filled educational experience for students.

Uno, Dos, Bass! by Richard Meyer, Grade 2
It’s a fiesta for your basses in this colorful section feature that your students will love putting together. Carefully written to make your bass section sound their best, this piece written by Richard Meyer starts with “Chiapanecas” (the famous Mexican “Clapping Song”) and segues into a clever 2/4 version of “Cielito Lindo.” The two songs are then heard simultaneously, bringing this “mini concerto” to a rousing conclusion. ¡Olé!

Looking for more multicultural options for strings? Visit our website! You can also contact us for more recommendations. Remember – shop Stanton’s for all your sheet music needs!

About the Author:
Dan C. has worked at Stanton’s since 1979, primarily with orchestra music and print promotions. A “working” musician, he’s a classical cellist, a rock & jazz bassist and a folk & country guitarist/singer. His free time is spent with family or reading, gardening, cycling and working puzzles. His series of musical puzzles (RP3 Rebus Puzzle Picture People) can be found on the Stanton’s Facebook page each Sunday. He also has a reputation as a pretty good joke teller. Seriously.


Uplifting Programmatic Pieces for Strings – Grade 2-2.5 21 October, 2016

recommended by Dan C., Orchestra Music Specialist

The best energetic program pieces of the year for younger string players!

Wave Dancer by Alan Lee Silva, Grade 2.5
Another wonderfully syncopated and sparkling “theme without a movie” from Alan Lee Silva. A jubilant F-Lydian introduction ushers in Wave Dancer. The harmonized, lyrical violin melody and the accented, syncopated phrases create a joyful and celebratory atmosphere from the opening measure. The driving C pedal point in the cellos propel the lilting violin phrases on toward the main theme. Syncopated rhythms are played precisely and accented, as well as lyrically and smoothly. The violins play expressively and passionately with precise 3, 3, 2, eighth-note syncopated accents. The mid- and low strings are expansive and play their sustains strongly with a beautiful, full sound. An abrupt key change up one step from C to D major gives the piece a boost in energy. It closes heroically with fortissimo unison sixteenth notes, leading to the final robust downbeat. Joyous!

Fire in the Bow by Brian Balmages, Grade 2
Conceived as an energetic and musically rewarding work, this piece also happens to be an excellent vehicle for teaching and reinforcing low 1 fingerings (violin/viola), “backward” extensions (cello), and half position (bass). The piece avoids augmented seconds and focuses on simple finger patterns while exploring dynamic harmonies that create wonderful tension and release throughout. A fantastic opener or closer, it keeps everyone busy and propels the music right up to the end!

Lost Horizon by Thom Sharp, Grade 2.5
This original work by Thom Sharp is an energetic adventure-themed rondo in which every section takes the lead heading off into the horizon looking for adventure. The rhythm of the A theme is used for new melodies in the contrasting sections, either in its original form or starting on a different beat to create a new, yet familiar, rhythm. The last iteration of the A melody employs augmentation. All of these devices provide ample opportunity for instructing students in form and structure and provide for efficient rehearsal time!

You can find more programmatic pieces for Grade 2-2.5 strings on our website! Or, give us a call – 1.800.42.MUSIC – and we’ll be happy to help! Shop Stanton’s for all your sheet music needs!

About the Author:
Dan C. has worked at Stanton’s since 1979, primarily with orchestra music and print promotions. A “working” musician, he’s a classical cellist, a rock & jazz bassist and a folk & country guitarist/singer. His free time is spent with family or reading, gardening, cycling and working puzzles. His series of musical puzzles (RP3 Rebus Puzzle Picture People) can be found on the Stanton’s Facebook page each Sunday. He also has a reputation as a pretty good joke teller. Seriously.


It’s a Christmas “Cello-bration!” 03 October, 2016

recommended by Dan C., Orchestra Music Specialist

Wonderful new holiday music for string orchestra at various grade levels to satisfy all of your groups.

German Christmas Carols arr. Sandra Dackow, Grade 1
Although relatively unknown, these three carols (one is “O Come, Little Children”) will still add festiveness to a holiday concert and give you something new and fresh. With the multicultural bonus, they will also help teach bow placement, cut time, tempo changes and key changes. Everyone gets some melody on these holiday tunes associated with singing children. Add optional sleigh bells for a jolly touch.

Christmas in the Renaissance arr. Robert A. Curry, Grade 2
Three dancelike carols circa mid-1500s (“Riu, Riu, Chiu;” “Dadme Albricias Hijos d’eva;” “Ding, Dong Merrily On High”) that will help reinforce cut time and low “1” (using accidentals.) Generously scored, it also has tambourine, bodhran and glockenspiel parts for authentic color.

Christmas Cello-bration arr. Bob Phillips, Grade 2
Your hot-shot cellos are showcased on “What Child Is This?,” “Oh Come, Oh Come, Emmanuel” and “Angels We Have Heard on High.” Cellos get 3rd & 4th position practice (first violins shift too) and everyone gets to experience key and style changes and an accidental G#.

The Little Drummer Boy arr. Bob Cerulli, Grade 2
Who needs a drummer, when your strings can play col legno for a drum-like effect? This popular, modern Christmas classic will fall together fast as you are reinforcing Bb and F notes. The upper strings carry most of the melodic material while the lower strings have a very effective ground bass. A refreshing, inventive arrangement!

Silent Night arr. Jeffrey E. Turner, Grade 2.5
Do you use a pianist with your string orchestra? This arrangement needs piano and even offers solo moments for it as well as principal cello and violin. With a tip of the hat to the Mannheim Steamroller, this fresh, ethereal setting in 4/4 time will help teach staggered bowing, triplets, sul tasto and transparency.

Appalachian Snowfall arr. Bob Phillips, Grade 3
The latest chance for you to rock out with the Trans-Siberian Orchestra for your holiday concert. With its engaging, syncopated rock rhythms, eighth note pulse and optional rock rhythm section it could be the highlight of the show. Use electric violin & guitar if you have them.

O Come, O Come Emmanuel arr. Brian Holmes, Grade 3+
Here is a great change of pace for a high school holiday concert. It’s a highly original and energizing version of this popular advent carol. Everyone has fairly challenging parts which incorporate contrasting moods, song “quotes,” and rhythmic stretches with overlaps. Very effective!

Find more holiday options for strings on our website, or contact us for personalized recommendations. Shop Stanton’s for all your sheet music needs!

About the Author:
Dan C. has worked at Stanton’s since 1979, primarily with orchestra music and print promotions. A “working” musician, he’s a classical cellist, a rock & jazz bassist and a folk & country guitarist/singer. His free time is spent with family or reading, gardening, cycling and working puzzles. His series of musical puzzles (RP3 Rebus Puzzle Picture People) can be found on the Stanton’s Facebook page each Sunday. He also has a reputation as a pretty good joke teller. Seriously.


The Stanton’s Difference: Make It A Road Trip!! 12 September, 2016

At Stanton’s, we know you have many choices when it comes to purchasing sheet music. Over the next few weeks, we want to take the opportunity to highlight just a few of the many reasons why Stanton’s is the best place to buy music for your school, church, private studio or personal use!

Places where you can browse and buy A LOT of sheet music are hard to come by. It’s amazing how many times we hear, “It’s so nice to be able to look at music before you buy it,” and “I live in                                              , and there is nowhere like this to buy music.” This last statement includes cities like New York and Los Angeles, and has been made by some of the touring Broadway Across America musicians who come through Columbus. If you live within driving distance of Columbus, and you’re wondering if a trip to Stanton’s is worth it the answer is “absolutely!”

Who doesn’t love a road trip? We’re not as far away as you might think. Columbus is only a 2 hour drive from Cleveland and Cincinnati, and 3 hours from Indianapolis, Pittsburgh, Lexington and some of the farther reaches of Ohio. Besides, Stanton’s Sheet Music is in a former A&P grocery store (complete with cupola) that has hundreds of thousands of sheet music titles in stock!

While you’re here, you are welcome to look through and compare all of the music that’s on hand. You can pull up a chair at our listening station or use the Stanton’s app on your smart phone to scan titles and listen to them throughout the store. If it’s your first time at Stanton’s, let us know – we’ll give you a tour! Did we mention that you can also take advantage of our knowledgeable staff, too?

Bring your entire music department! Do you have an upcoming professional development day this fall? We’d love to see your WHOLE music department here in the store! Let us know you’re coming, and we’ll be happy to set aside a table for your group, and we can even start pulling some repertoire suggestions for you to peruse while you’re here.

Need to grab lunch, or staying in town for dinner? In addition to sheet music suggestions, our staff can recommend plenty of great, non-chain places to grab a bite. Within walking distance are Dirty Frank’s, Little Palace, Katzinger’s Delicatessen, and Indian Oven, as well as Mikey’s Late Night Slice and Jeni’s Splendid Ice Creams at the Columbus Commons (and you’ve got to try Jeni’s!). Also nearby are plenty of restaurants in German Village, on Gay Street, and in the Short North and Arena Districts.

Have we given you enough reasons to come to Columbus and visit us? We look forward to seeing you soon!

Click here for more information on the STANTON’S DIFFERENCE!