News & Views Monday, December 29, 2014

Category: School Choral

Combo Concerts: Band or Orchestra and Choir 12 December, 2014

Recommended by Rachel Steele, School Choral Specialist

The concert schedule foband and choirr lots of schools is the same year-in and year-out.  Consider shaking things up this year with a “combo” concert!  Combine your groups across levels (imagine how big your band will be with students grades 5-12!) or across genres (your 6th grade choir would love to sing a piece or a medley with your high school jazz band!).

Whether it is a holiday performance, patriotic salute, or end of the year celebration, there is no more powerful statement to your community than a performance that features both your instrumental and vocal performing ensembles.  Show your parents, administrators, and school board members how many lives you and your colleagues touch, and give your students an experience that they will remember for years to come.

Dry Your Tears, Afrika – Music by John Williams, choral adaptation by Audrey Snyder, band and strings arrangements by Paul Lavenderdry your tears afrika

This arrangement from the moving 1997 movie Amistad features poetry by Bernard Dadie in the Mende language, and music by arguably the greatest film composer of all time, John Williams.  Since the choral is available in a variety of versions, this can be done with children’s choir, middle school choir, high school choir or any combination.  In addition, the available String Pak means that your orchestra and/or band could play.  Present this with sensitive program notes, appropriate readings or even excerpts of the film – your students will gain a new perspective on the history involved in this amazing music.

***For more advanced orchestral/choral groups, consider the John Williams Signature Edition of this piece for orchestra, SATB Choir and Children’s Choir.

SATB (08741425) – $1.95               SAB  (08741426) – $1.95               2 Part (08741427) – $1.95

Concert Band (04001735) – $70.00               String Pak (04626104) – $40.00

***John Williams Signature Edition, including orchestral & choral parts (04490084) – $375.00

Carols From the British Isles – arr. Douglas Wagner

carols from the british islesI love this carol medley specifically because it uses carols that are not overdone, but still common enough that your audience will recognize the tunes.  Included are “Suogan,” “I Saw Three Ships,” “Good People All, This Christmastime,” and “The Seven Joys of Mary.”  Since the band arrangement and choral arrangement(s) can be done as stand alone pieces, take some time to analyze where you may want to eliminate the melody in the instrumental (so as to feature the choir), or eliminate the chorals for a section to feature your instrumentalists.  The variety of voicings available for the choirs make this piece very do-able for most middle school or high school groups.  The Grade 3 band arrangement should be a cinch for your high school students, and could be playable by a strong middle school group as well.   Students will need the ability to play and sing in 6/8 time, while rhythms and ranges are moderate.

SATB (41762) – $1.85               SAB (41763) – $1.85               SSA (41764) – $1.85

Concert Band (39540) – $65.00

Armed Forces: Pride of America – arr. Larry Clark and Greg Gilpin

armed forces pride of america4th of July, Memorial Day, Veteran’s Day – we get calls each year for service medleys that can be performed at all of these occasions.  Our instrumental staff is a fan of this arrangement; it has some great quotations of Sousa marches in between the songs for each branch of the service.  Though written primarily for concert band,  there are reproducible string parts that come with the concert band arrangement.  At just under 7 minutes, it can be a bit of chop buster but this is the ONLY arrangement that features the songs of all 5 service branches. It also encourages audience participation by including a recitation of the Pledge of Allegiance and the singing of the National Anthem.  A solid piece for all organizations to have in their music libraries.

SATB (CM8973) – $2.75     SAB (CM8974) – $2.75     2 Part (CM8975) – $2.75     TTBB (CM8976) – $2.75

Concert Band w/ reproducible String Parts (CPS61) – $90.00

If you feel your group is ready for a traditional classical experience, try Schubert’s “Mass in G” or Vivaldi’s “Gloria.”  Both are about 20-30 minutes in length, although doing just the “Gloria in Excelsis” movement of the “Gloria” is an option.  One of the representatives in our choral department will be happy to help you if you’d like more information on pursuing either of these large works.

For more recommendations, give us a call at 1-800-42-MUSIC or email us at choral@stantons.com  Previous posts in this series : Men’s Combo Concerts; Women’s Combo Concerts; High School Choir w/ Children’s Choir

Rachel Steele has been working in the choral department at Stanton’s since 2013.  She previously taught middle school and high school band and choir for 13 years, and holds a bachelor’s and a master’s degree in music education from The Ohio State University.  Currently a member of the Heisey Wind Ensemble and a musician at Epiphany Lutheran Church (Pickerington, OH,) Rachel also enjoys reading, sewing, baking and the Pittsburgh Steelers!


Behind the Scenes: It’s That Time of Year… 04 December, 2014

by Ken Tilger, Band Education Specialist –

The holidays are already upon us. Thanksgiving has come and gone, and Christmas and Hanukkah are just around the corner. For the Stanton’s staff it means that convention season is also here! This winter we will be exhibiting (and selling!) music at music educators’ professional conferences in New York (NYSSMA), Michigan (MMC), Ohio (OMEA), Kentucky (KMEA), and, for the first time, The Midwest Clinic. These conferences are a great opportunity to talk shop directly with our expert staff, meet customers face-to-face that we may recognize by name (and voice!), and besides, it gets us out of the store! Ever wonder how our 6-8 booths of music get to your state conference? Check out the slideshow below to see how we pull, pack, and transport thousands of sheet music titles and accessory items, and if we’re exhibiting at your conference be sure to stop by the Stanton’s booth (under the big blue balloon) and say “hello”!

Click to view slideshow.

About the Author:
Ken is a former band director, and has been with Stanton’s since 2004. All he wants for Christmas is a Pittsburgh Penguins tuque, Guardians of the Galaxy on blu-ray, and some heavy-duty outerwear so he can play in the snow with his son this winter!


Behind the Scenes: Picking School Choral Promotions 01 December, 2014

music listening 2By Rachel Steele, School Choral Specialist

A few months ago, my colleague in the instrumental department, Ken Tilger, wrote a post about how that department picks the items for their promotions.  Not to be outdone, I’d like to take the opportunity to let you know how I and my partner in crime, Jen Sper, pick the items for our school choral promotions.

In late winter or early spring, publishers begin to send us their new releases for fall.  We get stacks of music (with demo CDs) to review from Hal Leonard (including Shawnee, Walton, Boosey & Hawkes, G. Schirmer, Pavane, Fred Bock etc.), Alfred (including Lawson-Gould), Lorenz (including Santa Barbara and Heritage), Carl Fischer (including BriLee), Hinshaw, Alliance, and a few other smaller publishers.  If you are thinking “Wow, that is quite a bit of music,” you’d be correct.  In fact, if you assign each piece an average listening/evaluation time of 3.5 minutes, we spend about 2,200 minutes, or 48 hours, or 6 full working  days (no lunch or potty breaks!) listening to more than 800 new releases.  For more data on our listening, scroll to the bottom.

When we listen, we’re not only keeping an ear out for our in-house promotions, but also for selections for our clinics (such as Stanton’s Super Session and Excellence in Choral Literature), OMEA Large Group Select Suggestions, and even music for Christmas, graduation and other special occasions.

music listening 3Round 1

Jen and I sit with the octavo in front of us and listen to every single selection from beginning to end.  We write our impressions on the cover of the octavo, usually just a few choice words or phrases.  After this, a piece goes into either the “no” or the “maybe” pile.  Our “no” pile is quite a bit larger than our “maybe” pile.  We consider it a good release if 25-30% of a publisher’s titles end up in the “maybe” category.

Round 2

Now that we’ve combed through the riff-raff, it’s time to consider the balance of our selections for our in-house promotions.  We sort our “maybe” pile by voicing, and then by genre.    Just like good concert programing, we are looking for a variety of styles – current pop, classic pop, broadway, folk songs, spirituals, world/multi-cultural, holiday music and various foreign languages.

Round 3

Now it’s time to play through selections at the piano.  We grab a genre and play through, looking for things like:

1.  Is it well written/voiced in all parts?

2.  Will students/teachers get something educational out of this?

3.  Is it enjoyable to sing/play/teach?

4.  Is it appropriate for school?

5.  Will it appeal to a wide variety of customers?

6.  If the song is available in multiple voicings, is one better than the other?  Why?

The answers to these questions will usually make our choices pretty clear, and then it’s time to make our lists, spreadsheets, and the actual promotional materials that you receive in your mailbox!

Promotions by the numbers 2014By the Numbers – This table shows the number of pieces that we promoted this year by publisher, and the percentage of their total offerings that we promoted.  You’ll see that even those publishers with the highest percentage of promoted items rarely break the 30% mark.

Other Points of Interest

  • Jen and I only look at promotions for school choral.  We have two other people who work specifically on selections for church choirs, and they have even more selections to listen to than we do!
  • While it might sound like a cushy job to sit and listen to music for 8 hours a day, it can be mentally exhausting after a while.
  • No, we don’t always agree, but you’d be amazed at how often 2 very opinionated people say the EXACT same thing about a particular piece.
  • If there is something that one of us truly believes is worth fighting for, the other one will generally give in.
  • The best part about the process is discovering a new piece that is just amazing!

We believe that devoting quite a bit of time and effort to this process is very important.   The 75 or so selections that make the cut are things that we recommend to you, our valued customers, for the entire school year. If you have questions about this process (or would like some recommendations), please feel free to give us a call at 1-800-42-MUSIC, ext. 1.

Rachel Steele has been working in the choral department at Stanton’s since 2013.  She previously taught middle school and high school band and choir for 13 years, and holds a bachelor’s and a master’s degree in music education from The Ohio State University.  Currently a member of the Heisey Wind Ensemble and a musician at Epiphany Lutheran Church (Pickerington, OH,) Rachel also enjoys reading, sewing, baking and the Pittsburgh Steelers!


New from Broadway Jr. and Getting To Know 18 November, 2014

broadway jr

logoG2KOur friends at Hal Leonard, MTI, and Rogers & Hammerstein Inc. have some great new choices for you in their “Broadway Junior” and “Getting To Know”  series.  Purchasing the performance pack listed for each show includes everything you need to produce it and grants you the rights to perform it as many times as you like with one year.  Take a look at these latest offerings that your students and audience members will love!

getting to know sound of musicGetting to Know “The Sound of Music”by Richard Rogers and Oscar Hammerstein II

The final collaboration between Rodgers & Hammerstein – The Sound of Music – was destined to become the world’s most beloved musical. When a postulant proves too high-spirited for the religious life, she is dispatched to serve as governess for the seven children of a widowed naval Captain. Her growing rapport with the youngsters, coupled with her generosity of spirit, gradually captures the heart of the stern Captain, and they marry. Upon returning from their honeymoon they discover that Austria has been invaded by the Nazis, who demand the Captain’s immediate service in their navy. The family’s narrow escape over the mountains to Switzerland on the eve of World War II provides one of the most thrilling and inspirational finales ever presented in the theater. The motion picture version remains the most popular movie musical of all time.

Preview Pack (00124211) ………………………………………………………………$15.00

Performance Pack (08754014)………………………………………………………..$650.00

Shrek jrShrek, Jr.by Jeanine Tesori

In a faraway kingdom, the green ogre Shrek finds his swamp invaded by banished fairytale misfits, runaways who’ve been cast off by Lord Farquaad, a tiny terror with big ambitions. When Shrek sets off with a wise-cracking donkey to confront Farquaad, he’s handed a task – if he rescues feisty Princess Fiona from the Dragon-guarded tower, his swamp will be returned to him. But, a fairy tale wouldn’t be complete without unexpected twists and turns along the way.

Preview Pack (00127656)……………………………………………………………… $10.00

Performance Pack (00127646) ………………………………………………………. $645.00

hairsprayjr. jpgHairspray Jr.Marc Shaiman

It’s 1962, and spunky plus-size teen Tracy Turnblad has one big dream — to dance on the popular Corny Collins Show. When she finally gets her shot, she’s transformed from social outcast to sudden star. In balancing her new-found power with her desire for justice, Tracy fights to dethrone the reigning Miss Teen Hairspray, Amber von Tussle, and integrate a TV network in the process. With the help of her outsized mom, Edna, and guest DJ Motormouth Maybelle, the rhythm of Tracy’s new beat just might prove unstoppable.

Preview Pack (00123343)………………………………………………………………..$10.00

Performance Pack (099717310)……………………………………………………….$645.00

 

If you’ve never worked with a Broadway Jr. show before, click here to read our previous post on the “how to’s,”  and here for some alternatives if you aren’t ready for a production that’s quite this big.  Questions?  Give us a call at 1-800-42-MUSIC, and we’ll be happy to assist you!

 


Combo Concerts: Mixed Groups/Children’s Choir 14 November, 2014

The concert schedule for lots of schools is the same year-in and year-out.  Consider shaking things up this year with a “combo” concert!  Combine your groups across levels (imagine how big your band will be with students grades 5-12!) or across genres (your 6th grade choir would love to sing a piece or a medley with your high school jazz band!).

Combo Concerts: Mixed Choir with Elementary Choir

Recommended by Rachel Steele, School Choral Specialist

Recruiting, like it or not, is part of the music teacher’s job.  Not only do lots of ensemble members ensure that you will have a choir (and a job,) it brings the music community just a little closer to our goal of making music education a part of every student’s academic career.  When you invite your elementary choir to be a part of a concert with your secondary students, you can show them a glimpse of what the0. choral music experience can give them as they become more mature musicians.  Just as importantly, it shows the parents of those students what they will be able to do in a few years if they continue their musical education.  Make your elementary students feel special by billing them as “Special Guest Artists” on your program, flyers and other communications.  Prior to the concert, pair them up with a high school student for a side-by-side rehearsal.  Elementary students will be in awe of the older kids, and you high schoolers will love being mentors for a day!

grow little treeGrow Little Tree - by Andrea Ramsey  2 Part  SBMP1170

Perfect for graduation or anytime of the year, this unique arrangement is tailor-made for children’s choir, but subject matter (the potential in each human being,) is appropriate for all ages.  Written for two part treble, it works well with adult women and children, though thoughtful part assignments/re-voicing could allow your men to participate as well.  In this case, it bears remembering that voicing does not always indicate difficulty level.  Give your elementary students plenty of time to learn this sometimes tricky melody, and make sure your older students are rock solid to lend support if needed.

Will you teach meWill You Teach Meby Victor C. Johnson  SATB 15/2682H (available 2 Part, SSA and 3 Part Mixed)

Beautiful melodies are the hallmark of Victor Johnson’s work, and this is an exceptionally fine example.  A terrific piece in defense of arts education without being preachy or obvious, the text talks about teaching our children how to imagine, dream, laugh, cry and even fail.  The oboe part (included in the octavo,) adds greatly to the texture.  Feature your elementary choir in unison on the opening solo, then share the soprano and alto parts with your older members.  If this causes a balance issue, consider using the three part mixed version and having all of your men sing part 3 together.

look at the worldLook at the Worldby John Rutter SATB and/or Children’s Choir  HMC1527

No need to alter parts or make adjustments here, it is all laid out for you.  Although this piece is sacred in nature, the sentiments expressed are nearly universal.  Each of the 4 verses is sung in unison, leaving endless possibilities for featuring different choirs, small groups or soloists.  The chorus is in four part harmony, giving a change of texture for each verse.  An instrumentation is also available (Double woodwind quintet and strings HMC1527A,) so invite some of your school’s orchestra to join you as well.

Let There Be Peace on Eartharr. Hawley Ades  SATB 35012617 (also available TTBB, SAB, SSA, 2 Part, Concert Band and Full Orchestra)

let there be peace on earthThe various voicings available for this piece are intended to be performed together, so grab as many choirs as you can and shout this sentiment from the rooftops!  Secular in nature, this piece is perfect for the holiday season (especially if you aren’t able to do sacred music,) or any time of the year.  The first section features a small group of singers echoing the chorus, which can be done in a multitude of ways.  Feature your children’s choir,  your seniors, or even a group of faculty, alumni or parents.  An oldie but a goodie!

hope for resolutionHope for ResolutionPaul Caldwell and Sean Ivory  SATB w/Children’s Chorus

This powerful work is dedicated to the winners of the 1993 Nobel Peace Prize, Nelson Mandela and F.W. DeClerk, leaders who worked together to end apartheid in South Africa.  While it’s format can look intimidating, it is really quite simple to put together.  The first half is a three part canon in English using the classic text “Of the Father’s Love Begotten.” The second half is a fairly simple SATB setting of a South African freedom song in Zulu.  Layered on top of this is a unison part that is the same melody featured in the canon.  Combining the choral singing traditions of Europe and Africa, the composers mirror the work of DeClerk and Mandela.  Voice the round however is easiest for you, then have your children sing the unison part while your older students tackle the SATB.  This is a joyful way to end any concert, and guaranteed to make moms cry!

For more recommendations for children’s choir or combination concerts, give us a call at 1-800-42-MUSIC or email us at choral@stantons.com  Previous posts in this series : Men’s Combo Concerts; Women’s Combo Concerts

Rachel Steele has been working in the choral department at Stanton’s since 2013.  She previously taught middle school and high school band and choir for 13 years, and holds a bachelor’s and a master’s degree in music education from The Ohio State University.  Currently a member of the Heisey Wind Ensemble and a musician at Epiphany Lutheran Church (Pickerington, OH,) Rachel also enjoys reading, sewing, baking and the Pittsburgh Steelers!


NEW from the Barbershop Harmony Society 05 November, 2014

PrintBarbershop harmony is a style of four-part, unaccompanied singing, utilizing close-harmony and intuitive voice leading characterized by consonant four-part chords for every melody note.

The Barbershop Harmony Society, legally and historically named the Society for the Preservation and Encouragement of Barber Shop Quartet Singing in America, Inc. (SPEBSQSA), is the first of several organizations to promote and preserve barbershop music as an art form. Founded by Owen C. Cash in 1938, the organization quickly grew, promoting barbershop harmony among men of all ages. Just under 25,000 men in the United States and Canada are members of this organization whose focus is on a cappella music.

Through a new distribution partnership, Stanton’s is proud to announce the availability of music from the Barbershop Harmony Society! The arrangements below are now available directly from Stanton’s, with more authentic BHS editions coming soon:

00137952Can You Feel the Love Tonight?
Consider Yourself
Drivin’ Me Crazy
I’m Gonne Live ‘Til I Die
Lazy Day
Lida Rose/Will I Ever Tell You
Little Saint Nick
No More Sorrow
O Canada
Stand By Me
The Star Spangled Banner
Swing Down Chariot
What’ll I Do
When I Fall In Love

For more exciting resources for barbershop and other men’s ensembles, please contact us! Shop Stanton’s for all your sheet music needs!


Choral Music from FROZEN 04 November, 2014

So, how many Elsas and Annas showed up at YOUR front door on Halloween? It’s a fact – FROZEN is everywhere! – and, it’s a perfect fit for your upcoming winter choral concerts. Here are all the choral arrangements from the hit Disney film:

NOW AVAILABLE:
Frozen (Choral Suite) arr. Roger Emerson – SSAATTBB, SATB divisi, SAB divisi & SA
Frozen (Choral Highlights) arr. Mark Brymer – SATB, SAB & 2-part
Do You Want to Build a Snowman? arr. Mark Brymer – SATB, SAB & 2-part
Let It Go arr. Mac Huff – SATB, SAB, 2-part & SSA
Let’s All Sing…Songs from Frozen (includes “Do You Want to Build a Snowman?,” “For the First Time In Forever,” “Let It Go,” “In Summer” and “Love Is an Open Door” – Teacher Edition & Singer Edition 10-pak

COMING SOON:
Frozen (Choral Highlights) arr. Mark Brymer – SSA
Love Is an Open Door arr. Mac Huff – SATB, SAB & 2-part

For more information, please contact us at 1.800.426.8742. Shop Stanton’s for all your sheet music needs!


Monster Mash for Middle School Choir 31 October, 2014

Monster Mash

Words and Music by Greg Gilpin

Recommended by Rachel Steele, School Choral Specialist

monster mash

Admit it…you smiled a little when you saw the words “Monster Mash!”   This Greg Gilpin choral arrangement of the one hit wonder from Bobby “Borris” Picket and the Crypt-Kickers has great potential for silliness.  The spoken solo we all know so well from the original version steals the show, and the choral parts are a snap to teach, full of ’60’s doo-wop fun.  Consider some of these ideas to use “Monster Mash” in performance or in your classroom:

  • Teach your kids about pop music in the 1950’s and 60’s, especially dances popular with teenagers, like the Mashed Potato and the Twist.  Try out some dance moves as you sing the song, or let small groups work on choreography for a section of the piece.
  • Ask a male teacher or even a principal (who doesn’t mind making a fool of themselves) to be your “surprise guest soloist.”  You can reveal your guest to the choir a few days before the performance when he shows up to rehearse, and then enlist them as your co-conspirators.  Ask the students to keep the identity of the soloist a mystery from their parents, friends, and concert guests-they’ll feel exclusive and you’ll give them a great bonding experience.
  • Split up the spoken solo among your students who want to “ham it up.”  Let them do a quick costume change backstage before they come out for their portion.
  • If you have some students who are into audio sampling, let them come up with your “background track” full of spooky lab sounds.  Better yet, take your whole class to the computer lab and see what they can come up with!

For more novelty number ideas, or great pieces for recruiting, give us a call at 1-800-42-MUSIC.  Shop Stanton’s for all your Spooky Sheet Music needs!

Rachel Steele has been working in the choral department at Stanton’s since 2013.  She previously taught middle school and high school band and choir for 13 years, and holds a bachelor’s and a master’s degree in music education from The Ohio State University.  Currently a member of the Heisey Wind Ensemble and a musician at Epiphany Lutheran Church (Pickerington, OH,) Rachel also enjoys reading, sewing, baking and the Pittsburgh Steelers!


New! Sight-Singing Materials for Your Choir 30 October, 2014

eisenhower-2_DONELet’s be honest, there is no perfect sight-singing resource for everyone.  Educational philosophies, students’ prior music education, ability level and teacher comfort all play a part when you choose your materials.  Here are two new sight-singing  resources that we hope many teachers will find helpful.

 

 

sing at first sight more melodiesSing at First Sight…More Melodies!By Andy Beck and Brian Lewis

Andy Beck’s Sing at First Sight books are used by many choral teachers as their sight-singing “textbook.”  This is a supplemental book that gives more practice for reading rhythms and melodies at all levels, and is useful regardless of whether or not you use Sing at First Sight as your primary text.  An included CD has reproducible PDF files for every page in the book, so you won’t have to spend your whole music budget on new sight-singing materials.  The easiest exercises begin with quarter notes on do and re only, and progress to include all key signatures, compound meter, and rhythms including dotted 8th/16th notes.

Book w/ CD (42793)……………………………………………………….$39.99

 

SOS.jpgSOS: Simplify Our Sight-Reading – By Laura Farnell & Mary Jane Phillips

Acclaimed choral composer and educator Laura Farnell has partnered with Mary Jane Phillips to create a new system for teaching sight singing.  SOS (Simplifying Our Sight Reading,) is based on the premise that students will comprehend sight singing better if they are exposed to one element at a time.  The authors separate pitch, rhythm, and notation before moving on to unison, 2 part and 3 part melodies.  An excellent supplement to the directors resource are the flash cards for both Bass and Treble Clef.  Large enough to be read by the entire choir at once, each shows one measure and can be combined with the other cards for a nearly endless number of exercises.

 

Director’s Resource (BLB009)…………………………………………………………….$9.99
Rhythm Reader (BL836)……………………………………………………………………$1.95
Flash Cards for Treble Clef (BLB010)……………………………………………………$19.99                                                                   Flash Cards for Bass Clef (BLB011)……………………………………………………….$19.99

For more recommendations of sight reading materials, give us a call at 1-800-42-MUSIC, check out our website, or visit us to browse in our store.  We look forward to hearing from you soon!


Choral Collections-Reproducible Budget-Stretchers 29 October, 2014

money_signTight budgets are a universal problem amongst teachers in general, and music teachers in particular.  Stanton’s understands that you might not always have the money to purchase new octavos, so consider one of these NEW budget-stretching collections for your group!  All are fully reproducible, so you can make as many copies as you need for your students without infringing on copyright law.  In addition, all include an accompaniment CD, making them concert ready and easy to rehearse.

 

multiple voicings,jpgMultiple Voicings for Middle School Voices - compiled by Mary Lynn Lightfoot  SAB, Three Part Mixed, SSA, TB and 2 Part.
This reproducible book is both a unique value and a great resource for quality repertoire for developing voices! Included in this collection are 2-3 different selections for each of the following voicings: SAB, 3-Part Mixed, SSA, TB and 2-Part. Reproducible PDFs are included on the supporting CD, along with the accompaniment tracks for each title.
Collection w/CD (30/3139H)…………………………………………………………….. $44.95

 

let the women singLet the Women Sing!by Greg Gilpin SSA

Let the Women Sing! is a new reproducible collection of chorals for soprano and alto voices.  Folk songs, holiday music, spirituals, inspirational songs, and patriotic themes fill this nine-song collection. This economical kit includes an enhanced CD-ROM with accompaniment and performance tracks, information about the composer, as well as reproducible vocal parts and instrument pages. Whether you have 10 or 100 female singers, this must-have collection will keep you on budget while supplying your program with excellent choral literature for your young female singers for many years to come.

Collection w/ CD (35029097)………………………………………………………………………………..$49.99

Also available:

Let the Men Sing! by Greg Gilpin (TTB)

Collection w/ CD (35012576)………………………………………………………………………………..$49.99

Just for the Gals compiled by Larry Pugh (SSA)

Collection w/ CD (30/2717H)………………………………………………………………………………..$44.95

Just for the Guys compiled by Larry Pugh (TB)

Collection w/ CD (30/2590H)………………………………………………………………………………..$44.95

Just for the Guys at Christmas compiled by Larry Pugh (TB)

Collection w/ CD (30/2850H)………………………………………………………………………………..$44.95

For more information on these collections or other choral collections, please give us a call at 1-800-42-MUSIC or email us at choral@stantons.com.

 


STANTON’S SPOTLIGHT on Elementary Choir 24 October, 2014

Each year, the knowledgeable staff at Stanton’s chooses select titles to promote to you, our valued customers.  We listen to thousands of new issues from scores of publishers and composers to present you with the very best in new music for your ensembles.  In our new Stanton’s Spotlight feature, we will put a special focus on one piece that we particularly enjoy, and tell you how it can serve you and your group.

Welcome Winter on This Night

Words and Music by Greg Gilpin

Recommended by Rachel Steele, School Choral Specialist

Teaching students to sing “in parts” is an important part of their musical development.  One of the easiest ways to introduce part singing to young students is the quodlibet, also known as a partner song.  In this selection, Gilpin begins with his own (English) text to J.S. Bach’s Bist Du Bei Mir.  After a short piano interlude, the second melody is introduced, this time an original composition.  Finally, the melodies are sung at the same time, creating the partner song.

While all partner songs can serve the purpose of learning to sing in parts, this one is especially good for some other reasons.  First, the range (C4 to F5) is very healthy for young singers.  The tessitura remains high enough that it encourages the use of head voice at all times, allowing your students to sing where they sound best.  In addition to range, the melody of Bist Due Bei Mir is excellent for working on the difference between steps, skips and leaps.  It has just enough leaps that it will challenge your singers to be accurate and not “scoop” or “slide”  to achieve larger welcome winter on this nightintervals.

This might be a great piece for your group because it…

  • is a great beginner two part piece
  • gives students a chance to experience the music of a great composer (J.S. Bach)
  • provides opportunities for interval work
  • teaches part singing
  • offers holiday/winter imagery without being  associated with a particular sacred holiday

For more great suggestions, please contact our choral department by phone at 1-800-42-MUSIC or email us at choral@stantons.com.

Rachel Steele has been working in the choral department at Stanton’s since 2013.  She previously taught middle school and high school band and choir for 13 years, and holds a bachelor’s and a master’s degree in music education from The Ohio State University.  Currently a member of the Heisey Wind Ensemble and a musician at Epiphany Lutheran Church (Pickerington, OH,) Rachel also enjoys reading, sewing, baking and the Pittsburgh Steelers!


Have a “Jolly Jingling” Christmas! 23 October, 2014

Feature your elementary choir this winter with one of these great octavos, as featured on Stanton’s Elementary General Music Clinic with Sharon Burch:

Goldfish Christmas by Alan Billingsley
What child has not wanted a puppy for Christmas? This original novelty song is a sweet and funny look at what can happen when we don’t get exactly what we want. Written in a theatrical style, this tune lends itself to riser choreography, leading to plenty of smiles all around!

A Jolly, Jingling Carol Medley arr. Greg Gilpin
This concise arrangement seamlessly strings together six carol favorites, featuring various twists on meter and style while maintaining accessibility. It is perfect as a festive opener or closer that audiences and singers will love.

We Are Santa’s Elves arr. Greg Gilpin
Made popular on the holiday television special “Rudolph the Red-Nosed Reindeer,” this Johnny Marks song is a bright new work for young voices and includes optional kazoos for added fun. Simple, repetitious part-writing makes this quick to learn and easy to add staging, movement, and costumes.

Welcome Winter On This Night by Greg Gilpin
This peaceful setting features Bach’s gorgeous “Bist du Bei Mir” partnered with a gentle original melody and Greg Gilpin’s descriptive winter text. Their simple beauty combines to provide an excellent vehicle for musical expression and interpretation.

For more holiday suggestions for your young choir, please contact us!


Pertinent Professional Development 21 October, 2014

by Jen Sper and Ken Tilger, School Music Specialists

IMG_0809Professional development days/sessions can be of great benefit to educators – IF they are relevant and applicable to your subject area! We were honored to be invited to present sessions at the Fine Arts Professional Development Day through the Tri-County Educational Service Center in Wooster, Ohio on October 17. Music teachers from Ashland, Wayne and Holmes counties gathered at the Wayne Center for the Arts for a full day of arts-related professional development sessions – a great opportunity to both learn from outside presenters and network with other nearby music educators!

With numerous new options for band warm-up/technique and beginning band, Ken’s session for band and orchestra directors highlighted books from publishers including Alfred (Sound Innovations; S.I. Ensemble Development), Hal Leonard (Essential Elements Interactive), FJH (Measures of Success; Warm-Ups and Beyond), Kjos (Tradition of Excellence; Technique & Musicianship), and Focus On Music (Scale & Rhythm Chunks). Online resources through the Stanton’s website were explored (Jukebox, Listening Library, mobile app, etc.), as well as sharing the Top 10 New Titles for Band for 2014-2015 using a custom playlist created through the Stanton’s Jukebox.

Jen presented a reading session for the choral directors in attendance, featuring new concert, festival and holiday literature for middle school and high school ensembles. A couple of brave sight-readers even served as accompanists! Many titles included were specially selected as quality options for OMEA Adjudicated Event performances, or are new additions to the required repertoire lists. Also discussed were recent changes to the required lists, and how these changes affect teacher’s programming and budgeting options.

IMG_0812On the way back, IMG_0813a stop at Grandpa’s Cheesebarn in Ashland was a requirement (we gotta eat, right?). One of Jen’s favorite stops on her way back and forth to college, Ken had never been before – and it’s a lot to take in! Much cheese (and dip, and jelly, and cider, and and and…) was consumed. :)

Are YOU planning programming for an upcoming professional development event? Contact us and let us help! Our knowledgeable and experienced staff are able to present a wide variety of sessions (and would love a field trip out of the store!), and we’re happy to tailor our topics to fit your needs.

About the authors:
Ken is a former band director, and has been with Stanton’s since 2004. He enjoys comic books, playing with his young son, and plays saxophone with Swing’s the Thing Big Band. You should check out their album Walk On Out the Door available on iTunes and Amazon.

Jen has been with Stanton’s since 2006. A former middle school and high school choral director, and an active choral singer and accompanist throughout the Central Ohio area, she also enjoys eating good food, running (to counteract the good food…) and the Muppets.


“The Stars Point the Way” 17 October, 2014

For a special feature for your treble ensembles in your upcoming holiday performances, Stanton’s suggests:

The Stars Point the Way by Mark Sirett
The Stars Point the Way was commissioned by the Cantilon Choirs of Edmonton, Alberta and was awarded “Outstanding Choral Composition for 2010” by the Association of Canadian Choral Communities. This Christmas carol is sub-titled “Cosmic Bethlehem” and is a beautiful mix of traditional metaphors and contemporary references that will engage your singers and audiences and make the miracle relevant and personal.

Cradle Hymn by Kim Andre Arnesen
The Norwegian composer has created a beautiful, expressive piece set to a poem by the famous English hymn writer Isaac Watts. Sing it at Christmas or any time of the year.

For more stunning holiday suggestions, contact us at 1.800.426.8742. Shop Stanton’s for all your sheet music needs!


Composer Profile: Stephen Main 14 October, 2014

by Jen Sper, Choral Music Specialist

Steve_Smile_HandHere at Stanton’s Sheet Music, choral composer Stephen Main first captured our attention with his original setting of the In the Bleak Midwinter text in 2006. While not yet prolific by any means – we’ve seen just seven titles from him – we’ve come to trust his name, and know that we’re in for something special! His work is consistently beautiful, with creative melodies and lush harmonic structure that simply feels good to both the singer and the listener.

Especially notable are Main’s contributions to holiday concert repertoire. In the Bleak Midwinter was featured on our Excellence in Choral Literature reading session in 2010, followed by The Darkest Midnight in December in 2013, and Blessed Be That Maid Mary and The Holly and the Ivy in 2014.

Born and raised in New York City, Mr. Main has music in his blood: his mother taught piano and his father, Tom Main, was a professional jazz trombonist with Si Zentner’s band in the 60s. As a choirboy Steve sang at St. Thomas Church Fifth Avenue under Gerre Hancock. He went on to study violin, piano, organ, theory and composition at the Choate School and then at Oberlin Conservatory. At the same time, he earned his B.A., M.A., and eventually his Ph.D. in Religious Philosophy from the University of Chicago. He is currently the Music Director at Piedmont Community Church, in the Bay Area, where he composes and conducts regular choral and orchestral performances. Stephen is active as an organist, harpist and conductor, with recent appearances in San Francisco, throughout Northern California, New York, Cincinnati and Los Angeles. He lives in San Francisco and LA.

As a composer, Steve’s work has included the recent publication of new choral and symphonic works, multiple commissions, and the completion of the scores for several films. He is a First Prize Winner of the John Ness Beck award for a new American choral work, and a 2007 winner of the American Composers Forum carol contest. The Minneapolis Star-Tribune hailed Stephen’s work as “evocative” music that “captures mystery.”

For more information about Stephen Main and his music, please visit his website.

Stanton’s Recommends: Blessed Be That Maid Mary, The Darkest Midnight in December, The Heavenly Table, In the Bleak Mid-Winter

About the Author:
Jen has been with Stanton’s since 2006. An active choral singer and accompanist throughout the Central Ohio area, she also enjoys eating good food, running (to counteract the good food…) and the Muppets.


Combo Concerts: Women 10 October, 2014

The concert schedule for lots of schools is the same year-in and year-out.  Consider shaking things up this year with a “combo” concert!  Combine your groups across levels (imagine how big your band will be with students grades 5-12!) or across genres (your 6th grade choir would love to sing a piece or a medley with your high school jazz band!).

Combo Concerts: Women

Recommended by Rachel Steele, School Choral Specialist

While putting on a concert that combines your male singers of all ages can be a bit of a challenge, doing the same with all of your women couldn’t be easier!  The women from your high school, middle school, and even upper elementary groups will have the same range and be able to sing 2, 3, or 4 part treble music.  Focus on choosing pieces with a message that will resonate with girls in a wide age range and text/subject matter that is appropriate for all.

symphony of nightThe Symphony Of Night - by Mark Patterson  2 Part  BL799

For a simple two part arrangement, you can’t beat the beauty of The Symphony of Night.  Mark Patterson writes his own text to the  beautiful Swedish folk song “Bred Dina Vida Vingar” and the result is a subtle, enchanting melody set with a text appropriate for any age group.  While it is not seasonal, the references to the darkness of night make this especially appropriate in the winter.  The supportive piano accompaniment adds to the texture while staying out of the way of your singers.

 

one tin soldierOne Tin Soldierarr. Kirby Shaw  2 Part 08666128

This piece comes from the folk rock tradition of the 1960’s and 70’s and the anti-war sentiments that were such a part of the music of that era.   The strophic form allows you to feature one group at a time or even some soloists during the verses and then have everyone sing the chorus.  One Tin Soldier is in a great range to let those light, healthy middle school voices soar, and sends an important message to singers of all ages.

all the pretty little horsesAll the Pretty Little Horsesarr. Andy Beck SSA 39848

Lullabies seem to be standard fare for women’s chorus, but we promise that this one is truly unique.  Andy Beck has taken this classic American folksong and spun it into a jazz waltz that makes it feel fresh and modern.  The harmonies are easy enough that less experienced singers won’t be intimidated, but mature enough to hold everyone’s interest.  A jazz flute and vibe part, available as free downloads here, really add to the texture and feel of this unique arrangement.  Who says women’s chorus can’t be cool too?

 

Pure Imaginationarr. Jay Althouse  SSA  37984

pure imaginationSince you’ve already committed to a concert combining your women’s groups (or at least one piece on a concert), why not go the extra step and ask for some of the adults in the community to join in as well?  Contact your local community chorus, church choir(s), alumni or even the parents of your students.  There is something incredibly powerful about women, young adults and children singing together, and this easy-to-learn arrangement will be perfect if you only have a rehearsal or two to put it together.  Whether they remember Willy Wonka from the Ronald Dahl books (1964), the Gene Wilder movie (1971) or the Johnny Depp remake (2005), your women will love Pure Imagination.

 

Msilale Wmsilale wanawakeanawake Paul Caldwell and Sean Ivory  SSA w/ Descant  00123692

Sometimes music education is about life lessons.  Msilale Wanawake (Women, Wake Up!) is an inspiring piece based on a Kenyan proverb.  Perfect for multi-grade level and multi-generational ensembles, this specifically addresses female students, encouraging women to stand up and “rid themselves of societal shackles, to walk away from servitude, gender bias and oppression.”  If you are nervous about younger groups singing a piece this complex, assign your middle school and/or elementary students the descant part (present for 3/4 of the piece), and leave your more advanced students to the other three parts.   A great kick-starter to discussion about women’s lives around the world.

It is possible to do a program for women’s chorus that doesn’t have a single piece about flowers, clouds, stars or boyfriends.    For more recommendations for women’s groups or combination concerts, give us a call at 1-800-42-MUSIC or email us at choral@stantons.com  Previous posts in this series : Men’s Combo Concerts

Rachel Steele has been working in the choral department at Stanton’s since 2013.  She previously taught middle school and high school band and choir for 13 years, and holds a bachelor’s and a master’s degree in music education from The Ohio State University.  Currently a member of the Heisey Wind Ensemble and a musician at Epiphany Lutheran Church (Pickerington, OH,) Rachel also enjoys reading, sewing, baking and the Pittsburgh Steelers!


STANTON’S SPOTLIGHT on Holiday Choral 09 October, 2014

Each year, the knowledgeable staff at Stanton’s chooses select titles to promote to you, our valued customers. We listen to thousands of new issues from scores of publishers and composers to present you with the very best in new music for your ensembles. In our new Stanton’s Spotlight feature, we will put a special focus on one piece that we particularly enjoy, and tell you how it can serve you and your group.

The Little Drummer Boy

arr. Philip Kern

recommended by Jen Sper, School Choral Specialist

Little Drummer Boy-page-001“The Little Drummer Boy” is a standard holiday carol, but this is NOT a standard arrangement! Philip Kern has set it here for a cappella SSATB voices (and short solos on a couple of verses), with an innovative world-music flavor. If you’ve been experimenting with contemporary a cappella repertoire (a la “The Sing-Off” or “Pitch Perfect”), this is a great selection for a December concert. You’ll need basses with a pretty solid low F, and all other ranges are moderate.

The percussion part as written is notated for a single hand drum, but in my opinion this sounds a little anemic. Raid the band room next door for all the world music percussion instruments you can find (and recruit some kids to play!). And you know what would be REALLY cool? If you have a talented vocal percussionist (or two), let them loose on the percussion part and go totally sans instruments!

I love a cappella arrangements for holiday performances, because they give you such freedom to travel with your ensemble – perform in the school cafeteria during lunch (recruit!), at the monthly school board meeting (advocate!), at the local mall or other holiday event (publicize!) or at the nursing home (give back to the community!).

This might be a great piece for your group because it…
•    incorporates a creative world-music style percussion groove, as well as some contemporary a cappella influence.
•    features moderate ranges and straight-forward divisi.
•    can “travel” for holiday performances.

For more great suggestions, please contact our Choral Department at 1.800.42.MUSIC or email us at choral@stantons.com.


“I Love the Winter Weather!” 08 October, 2014

Ready to program your upcoming holiday concert? Stanton’s suggests that you try one of these outstanding choices with your choir:

Carol of the Bells arr. Jay Rouse
A fabulous new find for the holidays! This favorite and familiar tune is crafted as a jazzy a cappella work that is creative and musically rich with diverse vocals, legato at times and crisp and bell-like at others. And let’s not forget the optional high soprano descant! Simply an outstanding arrangement for your singers.

In Dulci Jubilo arr. Audrey Snyder
Here is the joyous carol with Latin and English texts in a flexible and accessible setting that will create many performance options. The piano accompaniment is optional and the vocal parts are varied and colorful making this ideal for Christmas concerts and services.

The Little Drummer Boy arr. Philip Kern
No Christmas season would be complete without hearing this well-loved song. Kern’s fresh a cappella approach, featuring a world-rhythm drum part, really makes the classic shine. “Pa-rum-pum-pum-pum!”

Rise Up Shepherd and Follow arr. Robert L. Jefferson
Robert Jefferson shares his wonderfully rich arrangement of one of the most beautiful African-American Christmas spirituals. The lush harmonic texture announcing “good tidings of great joy” along with Jefferson’s benevolent choral summons to “follow” is sure to add depth to any holiday concert or festival performance.

Wolfgang’s Christmas Canon arr. Tom Fettke
This fabulous masterwork showstopper brings Mozart and the “Deck the Hall” lyrics together in a bright and accessible setting. This delightful novelty selection would make a terrific opener, closer, or encore!

Bethlehem Lullaby arr. Greg Gilpin
The haunting melody of the “Coventry Carol” is paired with original music set to the words of the traditional spiritual “What You Gonna Call Your Pretty Little Baby.” This artful and picturesque partner-style song setting, so special and unique with an elegant and supportive piano accompaniment, will be an unforgettable Christmas selection for your concerts.

Je Ne Fus Jamais Si Aise (Sound of Flute and Drum) arr. Jerry Estes
Pierre Certon’s dancing and lighthearted work is made more accessible for younger voices with this fine arrangement. The harmonic and textural elements remain true to the original, preserving the frivolity of the piece. You may choose to sing only the French and end at the optional fine, or extend the length and continue singing using an English text. Add the flute and percussion parts to create the perfect performance.

A Star Shines Bright by Mary Donnelly & George L.O. Strid
Angels sing “Gloria in excelsis” and a star shines over the stable in Bethlehem – the Nativity is celebrated in this lovely original work especially good for beginning SSA choirs. Well-crafted vocal writing with optional flute.

Little Saint Nick arr. Christopher Peterson
You will have fun, fun, fun with this 1963 holiday classic by the Beach Boys! A great concert showcase for men’s choirs and close harmony groups!

For more suggestions, check out our video below, click here to view our complete School Choral promotion for Holiday 2014, or contact us!


Holiday Choral Reading Session Recap 06 October, 2014

Pandora-Christmas-Music-StationsOn Saturday October 4, Stanton’s Sheet Music hosted our fourth annual FREE Holiday Choral Reading Session for area teachers and college music majors. Our attendees gathered in the James E. Strouse Workshop Hall with our clinicians Jen Sper and Rachel Steele, School Choral Music specialists at Stanton’s, for a wonderful morning of holiday music – and Christmas cookies! What a great way to welcome the season!

Did you miss out on the session? Never fear! Here are just a few of our favorite pieces that were featured:
For middle school choirs: Je Ne Fus Jamais Si Aise by Pierre Certon/arr. Jerry Estes
For high school choirs: In Dulci Jubilo arr. Audrey Snyder
For college choirs: The Little Drummer Boy arr. Philip Kern
For women’s choirs: The Stars Point the Way by Mark Sirett
For men’s choirs: Little Saint Nick arr. Christopher Peterson

For more titles featured on the clinic, check out Stanton’s Virtual Workshop! You’ll be able to preview full octavos with audio demonstrations, as well as LIVE video footage from the session. You can also find all of our Holiday Choral suggestions here, or contact us for more information.


STANTON’S SPOTLIGHT on Elementary Choir 24 September, 2014

Each year, the knowledgeable staff at Stanton’s chooses select titles to promote to you, our valued customers.  We listen to thousands of new issues from scores of publishers and composers to present you with the very best in new music for your ensembles.  In our new Stanton’s Spotlight feature, we will put a special focus on one piece that we particularly enjoy, and tell you how it can serve you and your group.

Ribbons in the Sky

Words and Music by Andy Beck

Recommended by Rachel Steele, School Choral Specialist

stanton's spotlight ribbons in the skyElementary students love to move to the music.  Whether it is in your general music class or in your elementary choir, “Ribbons in the Sky” is a beautiful selection for your elementary chorus that allows you to incorporate movement in a way that serves the musical concepts it teaches.  The piece has a simple melody with a small range (B3 to D5,) and is accompanied by a recorder and piano.  While it is a 2 part piece, the harmonies consist of echo patterns and a short (repeated) section where the homophonic parts are in contrary motion.

The composer suggests that you give each child a colored ribbon or scarf that corresponds with one of the colors mentioned in the text.  There are a multitude of ways that you can use these manipulatives to help your students.  Try having the students move the scarves slowly overhead during the length of a phrase.  This shows both the shape and duration of the phrase.   Students may also enjoy creating some of their own choreography to the piece.  Listen to a recording with your students and discuss appropriate types of motions, then let them create their own in small groups.  You might be amazed at what they come up with!

This might be a great piece for your group because it…

  • is a great beginner two part piece
  • gives students a chance to experience singing with an instrument
  • provides opportunities for Dalcroze-style music teaching
  • teaches slow, lyrical singing
  • offers the chance for creative choreography that is different from run-of-the-mill “choralography”

For more great suggestions, please contact our choral department by phone at 1-800-42-MUSIC or email us at choral@stantons.com.