News & Views Saturday, January 31, 2015

Sacred Solos of Dan Forrest 30 January, 2015

VC15H_Sacred_Solos_Page_1__82371.1412692552.500.750by Jennifer Fry, Vocal Music Specialist

Known for his well-crafted choral music in both the sacred and secular realms, composer Dan Forrest has transcribed ten of his choral anthems most frequently requested as vocal solos in a new collection, Sacred Solos of Dan Forrest, available in High (general range D-G), Medium (general range B-flat-E-flat) and Low (general range G-C) voice editions. Accompaniment CDs, performed by Dan, are also available for all three books – so you can (somewhat) literally have the composer accompanying! Titles include: “Arise, My Soul, Arise,” “Lord of the Small,” “The King of Love My Shepherd Is,” “A Cradle Carol,” “And Can It Be?,” “Cry No More,” “How Great Thou Art,” “An Offering,” “My Jesus, I Love Thee” and “The Work of Christmas.”

For more vocal repertoire suggestions, please visit us online or contact us!

About the Author:
Jennifer Fry is a graduate of Otterbein College with a degree in Vocal Performance. She has worked at Stanton’s for over 14 years specializing in Sacred Choral, Classical Vocal and Handbell music. Jennifer is a soprano section leader in the Chancel Choir at First Community Church in Columbus Ohio, and is also the founder, Artistic Director and bass bell ringer for Handbells Columbus.


Pop Music for Spring 2015 for Men’s & Women’s Choirs 29 January, 2015

by Jen Sper & Rachel Steele, School Choral Specialists

If you’re planning a concert of popular music with your choir this spring, we’ve got some great recommendations for you! Lighter repertoire is a fun option for end-of-year concerts, but don’t forget to find some good musical challenges for your students as well – you want to showcase all the progress they’ve made throughout the school year!

Shake It Off arr. Roger Emerson
Players gonna play, haters gonna hate, but I’m just gonna shake it off! Taylor Swift’s irresistible #1 hit from 2014 is pure pop delight!

With a Song in My Heart arr. Kirby Shaw
One of the greatest songs of all time, Rodgers & Hart’s classic romantic ballad will produce warm smiles all around as you luxuriate in the lush harmonies of this superb a cappella arrangement.

Gone, Gone, Gone arr. Andy Beck
American Idol winner Phillip Phillips topped the charts with this single from his debut album. Great voice-leading and appropriate ranges make it a perfect choice for developing men’s groups. And the sweet, heart-felt lyrics of this folk-pop love song will reveal the softer side of your guys!

Seize the Day arr. Kirby Shaw
Now in an exciting a cappella setting! This showstopper from the award-winning composer Alan Menken was featured in the Disney film and Broadway musical “Newsies.” Featuring a powerful “brotherhood” text, it begins with a compelling chorale-like opening and then explodes into rhythm that encourages us all to “seize the day!”

For more suggestions, click here to view our complete School Choral promotion for Spring 2015, or contact us!

About the Authors:
Jen Sper has been with Stanton’s since 2006. A former middle school and high school choral director, she holds a Bachelor of Music Education degree from Baldwin Wallace College Conservatory of Music. An active choral singer and accompanist throughout the Central Ohio area, she also enjoys eating good food, running (to counteract the good food…) and the Muppets.

Rachel Steele has been at Stanton’s since 2013. She previously taught middle school and high school band and choir for 13 years, and holds a Bachelor’s and Master’s degree in music education from The Ohio State University. Currently a member of the Heisey Wind Ensemble and a musician at Epiphany Lutheran Church (Pickerington OH), Rachel also enjoys reading, sewing, baking and the Pittsburgh Steelers!


FREE READING SESSION: In One Month! 28 January, 2015

spring-piano-music-269x300It’s been a long time since those reading sessions at the end of last summer…come refresh your memory with our recommended choral music for finishing out the school year!

FREE
SPRING CHORAL READING SESSION
Saturday, February 28 from 10:00-11:30

James E. Strouse Workshop Hall
Stanton’s Sheet Music
330 S. Fourth Street
Columbus OH 43215

We will read selected titles for SATB, men’s and women’s ensembles appropriate for high school spring concerts and graduation. Because we will be reading music directly from our large inventory and sharing the expertise of the Stanton’s School Choral staff, Jen Sper, Rachel Steele and Joyce Stonebraker, we are able to offer this reading session at no cost to you!

For more information, email us or call 1.800.426.8742 ext. 1.


Why FJH Masters Style 27 January, 2015

by Ken Tilger, Band Education Specialist –

In my previous post I featured a number of new titles perfect for teaching style to middle school band. One of those titles, Klezmer Clarinets by Timothy Loest, is published by FJH Music Company. You may have noticed that FJH is always well-represented in our band promotions, and with good reason. Each year their new band promotion is one that we look forward to most. It always features a reasonable number of titles, and the quality is consistent from top to bottom regardless of difficulty. When it comes to style, the arrangements that FJH chooses to publish are as authentic as they come.

We hear (and occasionally program – I won’t tell!) them all the time.   Arrangements that are “Latin” or “swing” when they are really just dressed up with a couple of “shakers” and other percussion “toys” or a ride cymbal “swing” pattern, but wind up sounding “jazzy” or just plain cheesy. If you take advantage of our band promotions, you know these tunes just don’t make the cut. It’s encouraging to note that there are more authentic sounding, quality arrangements from more publishers now (see that previous post!), but none knocks it out of the park as consistently as FJH.

GenresThe reason for this is quite simple: they go all in! Brian Balmages, Timothy Loest, Chris Sharp, and Co. incorporate all of the characteristic elements of a specific style into their arrangements. Percussion instrument choices are appropriate and the parts layered. Rhythmic figures are true to the original style; this includes notation, articulation, and syncopation. Chord changes are structured and voiced appropriately; harmonies are as lush (or open) as necessary; and scale patterns capture the flavor of the style (major, modal, etc). As I mentioned above, this is all regardless of difficulty! Characteristic flavor is not sacrificed just because some rhythms need to be simplified or ranges kept in check for beginning level players. The quality of pieces like Klezmer Clarinets and Rocky Mountain Romp are just as strong as At a Turkish Market and Arabian Dances, so you can feel good about programming stylized arrangements from FJH at any level. Check out our recommendations below – there’s a little something for everyone – and pick up an arrangement or two for your band. You (and your students) will be glad you did!

Stanton’s Recommends:
Beginning Band:
Court of the Noble Trumpeteers; Jingle Bells Samba Bells; Klezmer Clarinets; The Nutcracker (Overture & Trepak); Rocky Mountain Romp; Samba la Bamba
Middle School: At a Turkish Market; Blue Ridge Reel; Christmas at the Circus; Egyptique; Feliz Navidad; Give My Regards to Broadway; Images of Ireland; Irish Jig for Young Feet
High School: Arabian Dances; Fusion; Good King Wence-salsa; It’s the Most Wonderful Time of the Year; A Showstoppin’ Christmas; We Wish You a Mambo Christmas

*Author’s note: It was difficult separating the abundance of fantastic programmatic pieces from FJH from the stylistic charts, but that’s another post for another time! KT

About the Author:
Ken is a former band director, and has been with Stanton’s since 2004. He is excited to have finally seen Jeff Coffin and the Mu’tet live! He also enjoys comic books, all things Pittsburgh (Let’s Go Pens!), and plays saxophone with Swing’s the Thing Big Band.


Lights! 26 January, 2015

Do you need help creating exciting choreography for your choir? If so, you’ll want to join the thousands of choral directors across the country that have discovered Alfred Publishing’s popular movement DVDs! Featuring the creative talents of Sally K. Albrecht, Andy Beck and Anna Wentlent, these DVDs are a quick and easy way to add simple yet effective choreography to your concerts. Perfect for elementary, middle school or high school choirs, each DVD features movement suggestions for about 12 Alfred choral titles.

The newest DVD in the series is Lights!, which features such choral arrangements as “Aya Ngena,” “Jolly Old Saint Nick,” “Rockin’ Robin” and “When I Get My Name in Lights.”

Previously released DVDs from Alfred include: Reaching for the Stars!, Lift Me Up!, Showbiz!, Danza!, Follow Me to the Top!, Hooray for Hollywood! and more. Check out them all for great choreography ideas, or contact Stanton’s Sheet Music for more information.


Be Brave: Teach Style to Your Middle School Band 23 January, 2015

by Ken Tilger, Band Education Specialist –

GenresTeaching solid fundamentals of playing and basic musicianship are at the core of beginning and middle school band. Obviously there is already plenty to cover within your curriculum, and if your school district’s program is well-organized, there is a certain skill set and level of musicianship your students should reach before moving on to high school band. Throw in programming for a Christmas/winter concert and adjudicated performance/band trip, and your year is already really full. While all of these things are worthwhile, why not step outside the box a little bit and throw in a piece to teach style.

While I know there are reasons both musical and practical not to do this, there are a number of great reasons to do it, as well. First, it will provide some interesting variety to your concert programming. In addition to the usual concert overture/concert piece, lyrical selection, march, and programmatic piece, an authentic Latin or other “world” style, tango, waltz, or show-style piece will add some fun, flair, and may well be the highlight of your performance. Secondly, it will greatly enhance your group’s musicianship. Different styles place different reading and interpretation demands on players, and the more styles a musician encounters, the more versatile they become. As a big band saxophonist that came up through braveschool music programs, I feel like we all learn to play legato really well. This is great for developing tone and for classical playing and study, but limits our scope for interpreting notation. On most gigs, styles change from one tune to the next and most students really only encounter a variety of styles through jazz ensemble. Of course this is limited to those who participate, and if the programming is really solid. It’s never too early to plant seeds of versatility, and your overall program will greatly benefit from the variety of skills and depth of understanding your students gain. Lastly, exposure to a variety of styles will broaden your students’ view of music overall and its place in history.

Below I have featured two of my favorite new pieces to teach style. Keep in mind that if they are cheesy, not authentic, or merely dressed up with percussion toys, they don’t make the cut. As when choosing pieces for jazz band, I recommend selecting a piece that’s about 1 grade level easier than your ensemble typically plays. This will allow your students to easily nail down notes and rhythms so you can focus on interpretation, articulation, and nuance. I have also listed a few more new titles for middle school band that capture their respective styles perfectly. We even think enough of them that they’re all in our middle school band promotion!  If you’re considering teaching style this year, these are all great starting places. Go ahead. Be brave. Your students and audience will thank you.

Camino del Sol by Steve Hodges        Grade 2.5
Camino del Sol is a solid, fun to play Latin selection that will greatly develop your ensemble’s technique, rhythmic interpretation, and cut-time reading. Underpinned by a characteristic, syncopated bass ostinato and Latin percussion, a light melody passes throughout the band complete with full-bar, 8th note pick-ups and hits in all the right places. As always, articulation, note length (space!), and interpreting figures sets the style. The biggest challenges will be learning to hear & feel the figures in 2 (don’t over-count), and keeping the slurred melody from being too legato.

Zombie Tango by James Meredith      Grade 2
Teach beyond notes and rhythms with this fantastic tango. Sure it’s spooky per the title, but more important is its authenticity – bringing any cultural or dance style to life requires appropriate accents, note lengths, and interpretation of figures. More than just dressing it up with percussion instruments, Zombie Tango features characteristic elements in spades (including a bridge)! Aside from being a fun programming change-up, learning to interpret this style from the page will work wonders for reading articulation and rhythmic figures. We couldn’t recommend this piece more!

Stanton’s also recommends: African Alleluia, Klezmer Clarinets, and Three Brazilian Folksongs

About the Author:
Ken is a former band director, and has been with Stanton’s since 2004. He is excited to have finally seen Jeff Coffin and the Mu’tet live! He also enjoys comic books, all things Pittsburgh (Let’s Go Pens!), and plays saxophone with Swing’s the Thing Big Band.


Suggestions for Choral Adjudications 2015 22 January, 2015

by Jen Sper, School Choral Specialist

The beginning of 2015 is a perfect opportunity to look back at what your students have learned so far this school year, and to look forward to the new and exciting musical challenges you will present to them in the coming months. As you prepare for your upcoming concerts, festivals or adjudicated events, we recommend these repertoire choices, carefully chosen from many new and classic publications as “the best of the best!”

for SATB Ensembles
Red River Valley arr. Jeffrey Douma
This arrangement of the beloved folk song was first premiered by the Yale Glee Club in the fall of 2006, and has since become an audience favorite. Probably referring to the Red River that flows north between Minnesota and North Dakota into Lake Winnipeg, the sentiment expressed by the text is immediately understood by anyone who has had to bid farewell too soon to a loved one.

Ecce Sacerdos Magnus by J.M. Haydn/ed. Martin Banner
Johann Michael Haydn was a prolific composer who wrote hundreds of compositions including a Requiem. The text lends itself for use at ordination or a festival liturgy. Scored for mixed chorus with 2 horns and strings, the work is also easily accompanied by keyboard.

Now Sleeps the Crimson Petal by Greg Gilpin
Greg Gilpin’s setting of Alfred Lord Tennyson’s time-honored text is a musical example of text painting set to lush harmonic phrases and lyric melodies. The simple yet supportive accompaniment allows the vocals to be showcased throughout. A concert or festival winner.

Didn’t My Lord Deliver Daniel arr. Roger Emerson
Now available in a flexible SATB voicing, this driving rock spiritual features a subdued opening that explodes into high-powered energy sure to be a hit with your developing mixed choirs in middle and high school.

for Women’s Ensembles
La Maumariee (J’entends le loup) arr. Joni Jensen
An incredibly dynamic adaptation of this beloved French folk song. Quick and rhythmic, the work reflects the determination and liveliness of the girl in the poem who won’t let others dictate her love or her future. Meter changes, body percussion and the dancing oboe and piano parts all work together in this challenging arrangement. Sure to be a favorite of choirs and audiences alike! With piano, oboe, opt. frame drum and body percussion.

Kyrie (from Mass in B-flat Major #10) by W.A. Mozart/arr. Arkadi Serper
From the Mozart Missa Brevis K.275, this delightful work has been adapted for treble voices. An excellent introduction to Classical era style and performance practice!

Samiotissa arr. Serper/Serper
Explore the music of Greece with this traditional folksong that tells the story of a boy who loves a girl from the island of Samos. In 7/8 meter, the choral parts are accessible and it’s easy to add Greek folk dance steps to create an authentic experience. Includes pronunciation guide.

Now My Heart by Jacques Arcadelt/arr. Patrick M. Liebergen
Arcadelt’s French chanson, transcribed into English, was originally written for SAT voices. “Now My Heart” is an excellent example of Arcadelt’s tendency to set chanson in chordal style with simultaneous pronunciation of the text by all voices. The use of optional percussion will only add to the Renaissance experience, and is sure to be a concert or festival crowd-pleaser.

for Men’s Ensembles
Flanders Fields by Paul A. Aitken
This distinguished setting of the McCrae text was originally published for mixed choirs soon after being named the first winner of the ACDA Brock Memorial composition contest. Aitken’s new women’s and men’s voicings are just as inspiring as the original.

Praise the Lord by Stephen M. Hopkins
Hopkins’ highly spirited and rhythmic adaptation of Psalms 148 & 150 masterfully imbeds the hymn tune Lobe den Herren before a unison “Praise to the Lord.” Majestic at times, this piece offers a plethora of musical moments for men’s choirs.

Loch Lomond arr. Russell Robinson
One of the most well-known of all Scottish folk songs, Robinson’s arrangement of “Loch Lomond” captures the flavor of the Gaelic language – Scottish sounds and textures in both male voices and piano accompaniment. Sensitive, accessible and just plain pretty, it is sure to be a favorite of any concert or festival program.

Click here for all of our suggestions for select pieces for adjudicated events – while we have specifically geared these selections to be appropriate for Ohio Music Education Association events, this quality repertoire is sure to be successful on any spring concert or other event as well! For even more recommendations, please contact us.

About the Author:
Jen has been with Stanton’s since 2006. A former middle school and high school choral director, and an active choral singer and accompanist throughout the Central Ohio area, she also enjoys eating good food, running (to counteract the good food!) and the Muppets.


New From Hal Leonard-Online Audio! 21 January, 2015

stantonssheetmusic:

Plenty of love someonesheet music books still come with CDs, but here at Stanton’s  we are beginning to see something new from Hal Leonard called “Online Audio”.  Leonard has started to include “Online Audio” with pop sheets, too, beginning with “Love Someone“, by Jason Mraz.   What is it?   It’s a downloadable sound file.    How does it work?   Leonard has MyLibrary, which you access through the instructions on the inside of your book. Your music will include a sixteen digit  access code which you enter. Each copy of a book or sheet has a unique code.  The library is cloud based, so you can access it from anywhere with a PC, MAC, or mobile device.  More information about this new option can be found at halleonard.com/library.  For more information about new pop sheets or music books, contact us at 1-800-42-MUSIC, email us at keyboard@stantons.com, or visit our website.  Shop Stanton’s for all your sheet music needs!

Originally posted on Stanton's Sheet Music:

love someonePlenty of sheet music books still come with CDs, but here at Stanton’s  we are beginning to see something new from Hal Leonard called “Online Audio”.  Leonard has started to include “Online Audio” with pop sheets, too, beginning with “Love Someone”, by Jason Mraz.   What is it?   It’s a downloadable sound file.    How does it work?   Leonard has MyLibrary, which you access through the instructions on the inside of your book. Your music will include a sixteen digit  access code which you enter. Each copy of a book or sheet has a unique code.  The library is cloud based, so you can access it from anywhere with a PC, MAC, or mobile device.  More information about this new option can be found at halleonard.com/library.  For more information about new pop sheets or music books, contact us at 1-800-42-MUSIC, email us at keyboard@stantons.com, or visit our website at http://www.stantons.com. …

View original 8 more words


NEW in Contemporary A Cappella 20 January, 2015

Contemporary a cappella music gets more and more popular every year! With high-profile features like “The Sing-Off” and “Pitch Perfect,” many high schools and colleges are getting in on the action as well! Here are a few of Stanton’s new favorites for contemporary a cappella ensembles:

fun. (Medley from The Sing-Off) arr. Deke Sharon
America’s favorite a cappella show returned for another smash mini-season in 2013 with show-stoppers like this medley from super group fun. If you are up for no lip-synching, back-up bands or safety net, this chart is for you! Includes: Carry On, Some Nights, We Are Young.

I Need Your Love arr. Ben Bram
DJ Calvin Harris collaborated with English performer Ellie Goulding on this top-forty hit. Ben Bram’s contemporary treatment is sure to be a hit with your a cappella group!

Groovin’ arr. Kirby Shaw
The #1 hit from 1967 by the Young Rascals in a smooth vocals-only setting perfectly captures the relaxed slow groove of the song with an easy vocal accompaniment and an irresistible solo. Also available TTBB and SSAA.

I’ve Had the Time of My Life arr. Deke Sharon
Featured on NBC’s The Sing-Off, this #1 hit by Bill Medley and Jennifer Warnes from the 1987 film “Dirty Dancing” features two soloists with a rich vocal accompaniment. Opening simply, it builds consistently through two key changes to an electrifying final cadence.

Skyfall arr. J.A.C. Redford
The hit single by Adele from the motion picture “Skyfall” has been creatively arranged by J.A.C Redford, the orchestrator of the film. Using vocal percussion and divisi vocal parts, J.A.C. has created a setting that is perfect for jazz and show choirs as well as concert choirs.

If I Die Young arr. Ben Bram
This poignant story about a young life lost too early touched listeners around the world when released by The Band Perry. Ben’s contemporary a cappella setting is an appropriate choice for more reflective concert occasions. Also available SSAA.

Royals arr. Deke Sharon
This 2013 song by Lorde topped the Hot 100, AC and Rock charts and won the Grammy for song of the year and best pop performance. This a cappella setting will be a hit with pop, jazz and a cappella groups in high school, college and beyond! Also available SSAA.

Turn on the Radio arr. Bryan Sharpe
Contemporary a cappella groups will enjoy this Reba McEntire top hit as they sing about a relationship gone bad. “So listen Romeo, when you’re feelin’ kinda lonely, let me tell you where to go: turn on the radio!”

Little Lion Man arr. Deke Sharon
The debut single from 2009 by Mumford & Sons from their debut album “Sigh No More” packs a folk rock punch in this arrangement for unaccompanied male voices.

The Circle Game arr. Kate MacColl
Originally created for Vancouver’s ensemble Elektra, this concert arrangement features a soloist as it weaves the melody through every section in the ensemble. Multiple key changes add to the musicality of this delightful setting of a Joni Mitchell favorite.

For more a cappella suggestions, contact our Choral Department at 1.800.426.8742, ext. 1.


Pop Music for Spring 2015 for Middle School Choirs 19 January, 2015

by Jen Sper & Rachel Steele, School Choral Specialists

If you’re planning a concert of popular music with your choir this spring, we’ve got some great recommendations for you! Lighter repertoire is a fun option for end-of-year concerts, but don’t forget to find some good musical challenges for your students as well – you want to showcase all the progress they’ve made throughout the school year!

Shooting Star arr. Audrey Snyder
It’s time for you to shine! The fresh sounds of Owl City continue to delight fans across the globe. Young singers will love recreating the music with this accessible arrangement!

Wooly Bully arr. Jay Althouse
Sam the Sham and The Pharoahs became a worldwide sensation with this novelty hit based on a standard blues progression. Easy-to-sing harmonies and fun lyrics will stick with you long after the concert has ended. As for the strange title: according to Sam, “The name of my cat was Wooly Bully, so I started from there.”

Can’t Buy Me Love arr. Roger Emerson
Celebrate 50 years of the Beatles with this energetic song from 1964! Set in a rock style swing, the voices trade off, and the blues chord progression makes it easy to add guitar! A great showcase for younger and developing choirs!

Aladdin (Broadway Medley) arr. Mac Huff
Disney’s hit film from 1992 is now a dazzling, enchanting and invigorating Broadway musical! With the fabulous classic songs and several delightful new additions, this 14-minute medley will be a spectacular concert feature for choirs of all ages. It’s “Genie-us!”

For more suggestions, click here to view our complete School Choral promotion for Spring 2015, or contact us!

About the Authors:
Jen Sper has been with Stanton’s since 2006. A former middle school and high school choral director, she holds a Bachelor of Music Education degree from Baldwin Wallace College Conservatory of Music. An active choral singer and accompanist throughout the Central Ohio area, she also enjoys eating good food, running (to counteract the good food…) and the Muppets.

Rachel Steele has been at Stanton’s since 2013. She previously taught middle school and high school band and choir for 13 years, and holds a Bachelor’s and Master’s degree in music education from The Ohio State University. Currently a member of the Heisey Wind Ensemble and a musician at Epiphany Lutheran Church (Pickerington OH), Rachel also enjoys reading, sewing, baking and the Pittsburgh Steelers!


Give Me a Bucket 16 January, 2015

give me a bucket.jpg Stanton’s is proud to feature author and composer Mark Shelton as our first guest author for the Stanton’s blog.  Check out what Mark has to say about his latest resource, “Give Me A Bucket.”

Whether you are a middle school band director looking for a clever way to feature your percussionists or a general music teacher searching for a crowd-pleasing instrumental, a bit of bucket drumming can provide a fun-filled solution.  Bucket drumming has come to the elementary music classroom and the band hall with instructors and students getting in on the joy of pounding a pail.  Forming this type of ensemble is easy on the budget and provides a great vehicle for learning rhythms and exploring tone colors.

Clear directions are laid out for bucket drumming success in Give Me A Bucket (click here for a short tutorial.)  In addition to guiding you through the process of setting up your bucket ensemble, Give Me A Bucket provides a dozen short, easy-to-learn pieces, rehearsal tips, simple choreography, and a recording for study and inspiration.  Give Me A Bucket is suggested for grades 4-8 and the pieces are grouped by level of difficulty. All the pieces can be played with basic single stroke percussion skills. There are no rolls, flams, or complicated sticking patterns in the entire collection.

While most of the ensembles are written for different sizes of buckets playing polyphony,  a few works are scored for unison playing. One such ensemble is “Strange Asparagus” which makes clever use of Boomwhackers™ as the striking implement. The pitched tubes provide a bit of harmony and a colorful visual component.

Give Me A Bucket was featured at Stanton’s General Music Clinic facilitated by nationally recognized elementary music specialist, Sharon Burch http://youtu.be/TN067m4iddQ

Check out a performance of “Bucket Rock 101” with fourth and fifth grade students from Lannoye Elementary in Pulaski, WI.   http://youtu.be/ruB0VqgkHYo

My short bucket drumming tutorial can be found at http://youtu.be/-eGFsWHGong

Go ahead…set up a few pails, hand your students some sticks, pass out the parts, and let the bucket jam begin!

mark sheltonMark Shelton has presented hundreds of arts-in-education performances as a percussion soloist and as leader of the world music ensemble Tin Roof Tango. From the early days of his career as Visiting Artist at Coastal Carolina Community College to his current work as a soloist, clinician, sideman, and entrepreneur, Mark has created programs, products, and educational services for a variety of ages. Educational articles by Mark have appeared in Percussive Notes, Activate!, Dulcimer Players News, and Worship Musician.  (If you love “Give Me A Bucket“, also check out Mark’s previous publication “Give Me A Groove“.)


Pop Music for Spring 2015 for High School Choirs 15 January, 2015

by Jen Sper & Rachel Steele, School Choral Specialists

If you’re planning a concert of popular music with your choir this spring, we’ve got some great recommendations for you! Lighter repertoire is a fun option for end-of-year concerts, but don’t forget to find some good musical challenges for your students as well – you want to showcase all the progress they’ve made throughout the school year!

Counting Stars arr. Mark Brymer
The band OneRepublic performs music that reflects many musical influences, from rock to pop to indie and more. This hit from 2013 has a driving rhythm and unforgettable chorus that will electrify your stage! The 3-part mixed and 2-part alternate voicings offer a nice opportunity for a combined number for all your ensembles.

Ease On Down the Road arr. Mac Huff
From “The Wiz,” this stand-out R&B classic retains all the energy, optimism and Broadway pizzazz you could ever imagine! Now in a fantastic new arrangement, it’s perfect for pop, show and concert choirs as an opener, closer or concert theme.

Save the World/Don’t You Worry Child arr. Mark Brymer
Inspired by the vibrant a cappella sounds of the vocal group Pentatonix, this accessible setting of the mash-up by Swedish House Mafia is accompanied with keyboard and rhythm section, making this a fantastic showcase for high school pop and show choirs. Or, try it a cappella for true Pentatonix flavor!

Step In Time arr. Philip Kern
From Disney’s hit Broadway musical “Mary Poppins” comes this toe-tapping, broom-sweeping jewel! Accessible vocal writing provides thrills throughout for mixed voices and for the guys as well. Instrumental parts for this show-stopper are also available.

For more suggestions, click here to view our complete School Choral promotion for Spring 2015, or contact us!

About the Authors:
Jen Sper has been with Stanton’s since 2006. A former middle school and high school choral director, she holds a Bachelor of Music Education degree from Baldwin Wallace College Conservatory of Music. An active choral singer and accompanist throughout the Central Ohio area, she also enjoys eating good food, running (to counteract the good food…) and the Muppets.

Rachel Steele has been at Stanton’s since 2013. She previously taught middle school and high school band and choir for 13 years, and holds a Bachelor’s and Master’s degree in music education from The Ohio State University. Currently a member of the Heisey Wind Ensemble and a musician at Epiphany Lutheran Church (Pickerington OH), Rachel also enjoys reading, sewing, baking and the Pittsburgh Steelers!


Combo Concerts: Band-O-Rama 14 January, 2015

band o ramarecommended by Ken Tilger and Rachel Steele

The concert schedule for lots of schools is the same year-in and year-out.  Consider shaking things up this year with a “combo” concert!  Combine your groups across levels (imagine how big your band will be with students grades 5-12!) or across genres (your 6th grade choir would love to sing a piece or a medley with your high school jazz band!).

Ending the school year with a “mass” concert of bands in all grade levels is a common enough practice.  It’s great for your beginner students to hear the more advanced groups, and good for your high school bands to remember how exciting that first year of band was.  Of course, once you have all of those kids in the same room, everyone wants to hear them play together.  It’s the same challenge every year:  Pieces that are easy enough for your beginners make your older students roll their eyes; but who wants to spend the time re-writing and editing a grade 4 piece so that your 5th graders can play too?

THERE IS A SOLUTION that doesn’t involve you earning more grey hairs!  Several pieces are available that are specifically designed for this purpose, with all of the work done for you.  Each of the pieces below comes in two or three different versions that are intended to be played together.

bandoramaBand-O-Rama by Sandy Feldstein and Larry Clark

High School Set (PT-YCB06A-00)………………………………………………….$40.00

Elem./Intermediate Set (PT-YCB06B-00)…………………………………….$40.00

Band-O-Rama is a wonderful march designed for combined performance of beginning, intermediate and high school bands. The composition is available in two versions, one for high school band and one with parts for both elementary and intermediate bands.   Your high school students will play their parts (an easy grade 3) without much effort, while elementary students will need to be able to play in the keys of Bb and Eb Concert (limited range) and have mastered the dotted quarter/eighth note rhythm.  This piece is in the standard form of an American march, so it’s a great piece to being teaching about that form and tradition.

shorewood overtureShorewood Overture by Michael Sweeney

All-In-One Set, serves all three levels (04003858)………………………………..$95.00

Rather than the typical massed band number where everyone plays at once, this ingenious overture is written for 3 separate levels of player and allows the players of each level to be featured briefly by themselves, along with sections where everyone plays together. The easiest level includes nothing more difficult than 8th notes (no dotted rhythms) and all clarinet notes under the break, while the intermediate part is perfect for your older middle school students, involving more complex rhythms and an expanded range.  In addition, the “Level 3” parts include cues (also in the Level 3 score) allowing the older students to “jump in” for security if needed.  Includes scores and parts for all levels!

winged victoryWinged Victory by Brian Balmages

Grade 4 Version (B1340)………………………………………………………………..$75.00

Grade 2.5 Version (B1342)……………………………………………………………..$50.00

Grade 1 Version (B1341)…………………………………………………………………$40.00

You’ll be hard-pressed to find a more powerful and inspiring work with such variety of styles and musical material. The eternal fight for freedom and the spirit of community form the groundwork for this impressive mix of proud fanfares, undaunting rhythms, and heartfelt lyrical passages.  The most difficult version is a true grade four, providing a challenge for your older musicians, while even the earliest beginners can handle the easiest version.  The intermediate version has simplified variants of the more difficult material in the fanfare sections, allowing them to be a big part of the action.  Beginner band directors should be aware the the elementary students do rest for a large portion of the piece, so working on musicianship and listening skills is a must!

About the authors:

Ken is a former band director, and has been with Stanton’s since 2004. He enjoys comic books, playing with his young son, and plays saxophone with Swing’s the Thing Big Band. You should check out their album “Walk On Out the Door” available on iTunes and Amazon.

Rachel has been working in the choral department at Stanton’s since 2013.  She previously taught middle school and high school band and choir for 13 years, and holds a bachelor’s and a master’s degree in music education from The Ohio State University.  Currently a member of the Heisey Wind Ensemble and a musician at Epiphany Lutheran Church (Pickerington, OH,) Rachel also enjoys reading, sewing, baking and the Pittsburgh Steelers!

 


Simple Tools, Infinite Use 13 January, 2015

Here are three simple tools that can make a private music teacher’s life easier.  First, there is a useful tool called a “Wright-Way Notefinder”.  It is a music board that comes with a booklet of suggestions for how to use it.  This 6″ x 8″ board has a grand staff on it, and a note on a string that you can move up and down the staff.  The note finder is a fun tool to use, especially if the student gets to quiz the teacher!  Second, there is a little booklet called a “Wright-Way Practice Record”.  One page of this 4 1/2″ x 6″ booklet records the date of the assignment, the assignment, the time practiced every day, and two lines of blank staff for a special exercise, if needed.  The practice record can show the student how far he/she has progressed over time.   Third, there is the “Williams Bookkeeping Book“.  This 8 1/2″ x 5 1/2″ spiral book is a complete record of students’ lesson times and contact information, as well as the teacher’s  income and expenses.  The bookkeeping book is as practical as anything we have seen, and so easy to use!  For more information  about these products, or other, similar products, call us at 1-800-42-MUSIC, email us at keyboard@stantons.com, or visit our website.  Use Stanton’s for all your sheet music needs!

 


Composer Profile: John Rutter – 70th Anniversary 12 January, 2015

by Jen Sper, Choral Music Specialist

E53There’s always a little buzz of excitement in the Choral Department when a new piece by John Rutter comes across our desks. His works feel like old friends, even the first time you hear them – warm and comforting. With his 70th birthday in 2015, both Oxford University Press and Hinshaw Music are re-releasing a number of his most seminal compositions in new Anniversary Editions, with accompanying notes on both the music and performance written by Rutter himself.

Rutter’s work has strong footing in both the school and church choral markets, and an especially strong presence in the Christmas repertoire – his recordings with the Cambridge Singers are as Christmassy as the little drummer boy eating fruitcake!

Much of his secular music is less familiar, but equally well-crafted and memorable. Seeds Grow to Plants sets a lovely and thoughtful text about the cycle of life, and larger works such as When Icicles Hang and The Reluctant Dragon (which includes the charmingly funny Banquet Fugue) are refreshingly creative.

John Rutter was born in London in 1945 and received his first musical education as a chorister at Highgate School. He went on to study music at Clare College, Cambridge, where he wrote his first published compositions and conducted his first recording while still a student. His compositional career has embraced both large and small-scale choral works, orchestral and instrumental pieces, a piano concerto, two children’s operas, music for television, and specialist writing for such groups as the Philip Jones Brass Ensemble and the King’s Singers. From 1975 to 1979 he was Director of Music at Clare College, whose choir he directed in a number of broadcasts and recordings. After giving up the Clare post to allow more time for composition, he formed the Cambridge Singers as a professional chamber choir primarily dedicated to recording, and he now divides his time between composition and conducting.

For more information about John Rutter and his music, please visit his website.

Stanton’s Recommends: For the Beauty of the Earth, Candlelight Carol, Christ Is the Morning Star, Blow Blow Thou Winter Wind, Banquet Fugue, Seeds Grow to Plants

About the Author:
Jen has been with Stanton’s since 2006. A former middle school and high school choral director, and an active choral singer and accompanist throughout the Central Ohio area, she also enjoys eating good food, running (to counteract the good food!) and the Muppets.


Stanton’s Comes To You! 09 January, 2015

stantonlogolarge

Music educators all over the country are gearing up for convention season!  As you attend amazing sessions that leave you inspired and invigorated,  don’t forget to stop by the exhibit hall and order some of those wonderful pieces at the Stanton’s Sheet Music booth.  We are excited to be making our regular appearances at educators’ conferences in New York, Michigan, Kentucky and Ohio.  Look up for our signature blue balloon and come by to ask questions, shop, or just say hello and introduce yourself to our knowledgeable staff.  We look forward to seeing you at:    

 

michigan music conferenceThe Michigan Music Conference-January 22nd-24th at Devos Place in Grand Rapids, MichiganStanton’s booth numbers are 51-58; exhibit hours are Friday 8:30-6:00 and Saturday 8:30-1:00.

 

KMEA Professional Development Conference-February 4th-7th at the Kentucky International Convention Center in Louisville, KYStanton’s booth numbers are 501–507/600–606; exhibit hours are Thursday and Friday 9-6.

 

omea conference 2015OMEA Professional Development Conference- Feb. 5th–7th, 2014 at the Cleveland Convention Center in Cleveland, OHStanton’s booth numbers are 231, 233, 235, 237, 330, 332, 334, 336, 338 ; exhibit hours are Thurday 1-6,  Friday 9-5 and Saturday 9-12:30

Also look for us this summer at the International Trumpet Guild Conference here in beautiful   Columbus, Ohio.  More details TBA!ITG-logoFor more information about our conference booths or products, please contact us at www.stantons.com!


Easter, 2015: What will you play for Easter? 08 January, 2015

It’s h00-34450ard to believe, I know.  Christmas is barely over, and now it’s time to think about music for Easter.  April 5th will be here before we know it!  For church pianists, the earlier selections are made, the more time there is to prepare.  “What Praise Can I Play for Easter?” is a collection of ten late intermediate to early advanced piano pieces arranged by Carol Tornquist.  “What Can I Play for Easter?” is a collection of ten late intermediate pieces for Holy Week, arranged by Cindy Berry.  For more information about these collections or others for Easter, call us at 1-800-42-MUSIC, email us at keyboard@stantons.com, or visit our website.  Shop Stanton’s for all your sheet music needs!


Current Hits on Broadway 07 January, 2015

00129024This new release from Hal Leonard  includes songs from the newest Broadway  musicals.   From “Once” to “Beautiful”, one or two songs from each of eighteen shows are included.  This is a great collection for those who are preparing for auditions, or for those who just enjoy the more recent musicals and recent musical revivals.  It would be a great addition to a voice teacher’s library as well. For more information about this collection, or other similar material, call us at 1-800-42-MUSIC, email us at keyboard@stantons.com, or visit our website.  Shop Stanton’s for all your sheet music needs.


Scales for Young Violinists and Violists 06 January, 2015

scales for young violinists scales for young violistsScales for Young Violinists and Scales for Young Violists

Recommended by Dan Clark, School Orchestra Specialist

Few pedagogical concepts are as important as scales, and Barbara Barber has fashioned some new books of scales designed especially for the younger violin and viola player.

 

In these volumes you will find:

• Scales only spanning two octaves; each book utilizes the circle of fifths

• All major and relative minor keys up to six sharps and five flats (violin begins the Key of G, viola in C)

•Various bowings, rhythmic variations and recommended fingerings

• Preparatory shift studies for all the keys

•Arpeggios – tonic major & minor, sub-mediant, sub-dominant major & minor
as well as diminished 7th, dominant 7th, broken thirds and chromatic scale in that key

•Exercises for 1st position and 1st-3rd position double stops

• Work with octaves, thirds, sixths and harmonics.

This book is wonderful preparation for the best-selling, three octave Scales for Advanced Violinists (8010X – $12.99) and Scales for Advanced Violists (8023 – $12.99), both by Barbara Barber.

Dan Clark has worked at Stanton’s since 1979, primarily with orchestra music and print promotions.  A “working” musician, he’s a classical cellist, a rock & jazz bassist and a folk & country guitarist/singer. His free time is spent with family or reading, gardening, cycling and working puzzles. He also has a reputation as a pretty good joke teller. Seriously.


Church Reading Session – THIS SATURDAY! 05 January, 2015

Attend Stanton’s Sacred Choral Reading Session this Saturday, January 10th 2015, and you’ll be fully prepared for the remainder of your church choir season. We will be featuring the best new choral publications for Lent, Easter and beyond, as chosen by Stanton’s sacred choral staff. We’re excited to announce that this January’s clinic will be held at Livingston United Methodist Church, just a few blocks from our store in downtown Columbus.

Attending this clinic is a fantastic way for you to choose new church anthems for your choir by hearing the music read live. This January’s clinicians will be Stanton’s own Jennifer Fry and president emeritus Jim Strouse. Please feel free to contact Stanton’s at 1-800-42-MUSIC and speak with a choral staff member for the details of the event. We look forward to seeing you at 8:30 on January 11th for registration, coffee and doughnuts followed by a wonderful morning of singing!

Click here to watch video

Shop Stanton’s for all your sheet music needs!


Church Cantatas for Lent & Easter 2015 02 January, 2015

Lead your congregation in Holy Week and Easter worship with one of these dynamic cantatas, as recommended by Stanton’s expert Sacred Choral Music staff!

The Passion and the Promise by Lloyd Larson & Mark Hayes
The many moods of Holy Week, followed by the triumph of Easter, are captured in this moving work by Lloyd Larson and Mark Hayes, with narration by Pamela Stewart. From the celebration of Palm Sunday to the despair of Good Friday to the triumph of the Resurrection, “The Passion and the Promise” presents fresh, dynamic words and music with creative narration. Perform each anthem separately during Holy Week and Easter, or together as an unforgettable 25-minute musical.

The Final Hours by Lee & Susan Dengler
Create a moving worship experience for your church and community with “The Final Hours.” Three moving anthems are woven together with the spoken word, focusing on Christ’s final earthly hours. Perfect for a Good Friday service, or performed as separate anthems during Holy Week, this suite is easily prepared and presented. Add the optional flute, cello, and single handbell to enhance the presentation. A great choice for smaller choirs or when time to prepare a larger work is limited. It will surely bring your congregation to a place of reverence, inspiration, and celebration.

For more recommendations for your church choir during the upcoming Lenten and Easter season, please call us at 1.800.426.8742. Shop Stanton’s for all your sheet music needs!


Happy New Year! 01 January, 2015

Here’s to a happy, healthy and prosperous New Year for you and your loved ones.  We’re closed today in observance of the holiday, but we’ll be open tomorrow morning at 9:00 sharp to serve your sheet music needs.  In the meantime, feel free to visit us online!New year's muppets!