News & Views Thursday, June 30, 2016

Category: Orchestra

Stanton’s E-Tools: Wishlists 13 June, 2016

wishlistThe amazing staff at Stanton’s knows how valuable your time is. That’s why we try to provide you with as many tools as we can to make choosing music easier,  faster and more enjoyable. In this series of blog posts, we will be profiling our E-tools. Whether you are a local customer here in Columbus, OH or one of our many friends around the world, we hope you will find a way to use our E-tools!

Overheard often at Stanton’s:

  • “I did this piece in high school. I loved it!!! It made my whole year in band/choir/orchestra. I’d love to do it with my kids, but they’re just not ready yet. Sigh. Maybe in a few years.”
  • “There’s so many great new pieces out this year. I can’t do them all this fall, but maybe this spring.”
  • “This would be perfect for a theme concert about ___________. I’ll have to keep it in mind for the future.”
  • “I listened to all those pieces on all those CDs from the publishers, but now I can’t remember what I liked!”

All of the above are great reasons to use the Wish List feature on the Stanton’s website. As musicians, we are always on the lookout for new pieces that will inspire us as well as invigorate and educate our students. The Wish List feature allows you to keep track of pieces you like, and organize them any way you want (by concert program, theme/style, performance year, etc). You can also email your list(s) to friends or colleagues, export it to a Microsoft Excel file for your own records, submit it to your treasurer as a requisition for a purchase order, or send it directly to us at Stanton’s to place your order!

If you have questions about how to use the Stanton’s Wishlist, or if you need further information on any of our e-tools, feel free to call us at 1-800-42-MUSIC or email us at greatservice@stantons.com.

Click here for more in the Stanton’s E-Tools series!


The Stanton’s Difference: 21 Day Trial 03 June, 2016

At Stanton’s, we know you have many choices when it comes to purchasing sheet music. Over the next few weeks, we want to take the opportunity to highlight just a few of the many reasons why Stanton’s is the best place to buy music for your school, church, private studio or personal use!

Stanton’s is one of the largest sheet music retailers in the country, with tens of thousands of titles in stock. We understand that many of our customers can’t make it to our Columbus, Ohio location to peruse music, so we offer a 21 Day Trial service.

How It Works: Music can be secured with either a Stanton’s account or a credit card. We send you the in-stock materials you request, and you pay nothing but the shipping and handling costs. As long as the music is returned to us in NEW condition within 21 days, you are never charged. If you have specific titles you’d like to see, we will happily send those to you, or you can ask one of our knowledgeable staff members to select pieces for you based on concert theme, performance venue, type of group, etc.

What You Can Take On Trial (by department):

Choral, Handbell, Classroom General Music & Solo VocalYou may take up to 20 single copies of octavos and/or up to 5 musicals, collections, or director’s scores.

Band, Orchestra and InstrumentalYou may take up to six items on trial, including full arrangements, solos and chamber ensembles (only scores will be sent for titles appearing on the OMEA High School Large Group Contest List).

Piano/KeyboardUp to five collections and/or 10 teaching pieces, one copy each. Popular sheet music is not available for 21 Day Trial. 75% (by dollar amount) of the piano music on trial must be purchased.

For more details about our 21 Day Trial, visit us online at www.stantons.com, or give us a call at 1-800-42-MUSIC!

Click here for more information on the STANTON’S DIFFERENCE!


Why Does Copyright Law Matter? 01 June, 2016

copyrightrespectfully offered by Dan C., Orchestra Music Specialist

If you are reading this, you are probably a musician or associate with musicians. When you are a musician or hang with musicians, you begin to think that everyone is probably involved in music in one way or another. But, we musicians are really a fairly finite group of people.

It has been speculated that if you were to gather all people in the United States who make their living in the music industry (whether creating it, performing it, recording it, writing it, teaching it, publishing it, selling it, making and repairing instruments that play it etc), you would end up with about the same amount of people as are employed by the Kellogg’s Company – you know, the cereal and snack food folks. Yeah – a pretty finite group!

It seems unlikely that anyone involved in this tight-knit music community would intentionally keep their fellow musicians from trying to make a living. And yet, that’s what you do when you copy sheet music without permission. Sheet music is property – like a trumpet, violin or a microphone – but it’s intellectual property, which can be a bit nebulous. Basically, only the Copyright Holder has the “right” to “copy” their work. When you copy music without permission from the copyright holder, you are actually stealing it.

When you copy music without a second thought, that means the music is not being sold. Consequently, the music retailer and all their employees lose income, the music publisher and all their employees lose income, and, perhaps most tragically, the composer loses income. Your fellow musicians are being deprived of their ability to make a living.

So not only are you breaking the law by copying music, you are keeping your brothers and sisters in this finite musical community from doing what they love to do: be a musician. If they can’t make a living at it, they may have to leave and do something else. And the musical world becomes an even smaller place.

So don’t copy music without permission – it’s not only illegal, it’s immoral. Let’s make sure the livelihood of our music community is secure so we can all continue to make music – that thing we love to do!

For more information on what you can and cannot do when it comes to copyright, check out these books on the subject:
Copyright Basics by Joel Leach
The Teacher’s Guide to Music, Media, and Copyright Law by James Frankel
Music Copyright Law by Moser & Slay
Music Publishing: The Complete Guide by Steve Winogradsky

About the Author:
Dan C. has worked at Stanton’s since 1979, primarily with orchestra music and print promotions. A “working” musician, he’s a classical cellist, a rock & jazz bassist and a folk & country guitarist/singer. His free time is spent with family or reading, gardening, cycling and working puzzles. His series of musical puzzles (RP3 Rebus Puzzle Picture People) can be found on the Stanton’s Facebook page each Sunday. He also has a reputation as a pretty good joke teller. Seriously.


Stanton’s E-Tools: Jukebox 25 May, 2016

website Jukebox image for promoThe amazing staff at Stanton’s knows how valuable your time is. That’s why we try to provide you with as many tools as we can to make choosing music easier,  faster and more enjoyable. In this series of blog posts, we will be profiling our E-tools. Whether you are a local customer here in Columbus, OH or one of our many friends around the world, we hope you will find a way to use our E-tools!

As an extension of our Listening Library, we are proud to offer Stanton’s JukeboxStanton’s Jukebox is a specialized “wish list” where you can add sound samples from our Listening Library, then use it to:

  • Research your music purchases by building a playlist for all the titles you are considering, and then easily compare “apples to apples” as you listen.
  • Arrange your concert program by listening to full-length pieces in order, then rearranging as needed to allow for a variety in tempi and styles.
  • Build specific playlists for each of your different ensembles to assist you with your rehearsal planning and score study.
  • Generate a personalized URL for each playlist that can be emailed to your ensemble to enhance at-home practice – you can even add custom practice/rehearsal notes to appear with each playlist.
  • Forward your playlist to your school administrator or Booster/PTA president when you need to solicit funding for specific music.
  • Design separate playlists for different genres or eras of music for your Music History or Music Appreciation students to use during class or with homework.
  • Create a list of your favorite works for your personal listening pleasure in your home or office, and let it inspire you to continue strengthening your ensembles!

If you have questions about how to use the Stanton’s Jukebox feature, we also have a quick video tutorial that you can watch, as well as a list of “Frequently Asked Questions.” As always, if you need further information, feel free to call us at 1-800-42-MUSIC or email us at greatservice@stantons.com.

Click here for more in the Stanton’s E-Tools series!


The Stanton’s Difference: Setting Up Accounts Is Easy! 18 April, 2016

At Stanton’s, we know you have many choices when it comes to purchasing sheet music. Over the next few weeks, we want to take the opportunity to highlight just a few of the many reasons why Stanton’s is the best place to buy music for your school, church, private studio or personal use!

If you’re a school, church or community music director, your purchases are usually made to an account to be paid by your institution. If you are new to any of these positions, or have recently changed gigs, give us a call! We will be happy to provide you with your organization’s account number(s), and walk you through the billing process.

Are you new to shopping with Stanton’s? Rest easy – our staff can check to see if your organization already has an account (many often do), and if not, setting up a new account is easy! In fact, we can help you set up a new account when you place your first order, or make your first purchase, in a matter of minutes!

What we need:
– Name of the organization to be billed
– Billing address
– Billing phone number
– Purchase order number (if required by billing institution)

Let us know where you would like to have your order shipped, and you’re done!

Some notes:
*
Stanton’s can bill your: School Board/District; Church; School Building Activity Fund; Booster organization; Community Band/Choir organization

*We can assign multiple ship-to addresses and institutional credit cards to your account.

*You can bill orders to your account at our store, over the phone, at stantons.com, or at any conference or reading session where we’re exhibiting!

If you have any questions, give us a call at 1-800-42-MUSIC and speak with our sales staff, or press 4 to speak directly with our accounting department, and shop Stanton’s for all your sheet music needs!

Click here for more information on the STANTON’S DIFFERENCE!


Stanton’s E-Tools: Digital Delivery 08 April, 2016

digital deliveryThe amazing staff at Stanton’s knows how valuable your time is. That’s why we try to provide you with as many tools as we can to make choosing music easier, faster and more enjoyable! In this series of blog posts, we will be profiling our E-tools. Whether you are a local customer here in Columbus, OH or one of our many friends around the world, we hope you will find a way to use our E-tools!

It’s happened to all of us: You have a rehearsal or a performance coming up in a few days (or a few hours!) and you’ve lost your music; it’s they day before a competition, and your judges’ copies are nowhere to be found; you desperately need something new and fresh for your church choir to start on tonight. In many cases, Stanton’s Digital Delivery can come to your rescue!

Using the Digital Delivery website, you can purchase thousands of titles and print them at home on your home computer within minutes. In addition, many popular sheets (including pop, Broadway, country, etc) can be transposed to the key of your choosing, so you’ll always be able to have piece in a comfortable range for you. Lead lines can also be transposed for instruments such as trumpet, clarinet, saxophone and French horn. Many titles are available in convenient PDF format, so they’re ready to use right on your tablet!

You can access our Digital Delivery site directly by clicking here, where you can browse options for bands, orchestradigital delivery printers, choirs, and solos for many different instruments. You can also use the regular Stanton’s website, where titles available for Digital Delivery have a printer icon next to their descriptions. Clicking on that icon will take you directly to that item’s page on the Digital Delivery website, where you can purchase and print.

For questions about how to use the Stanton’s Digital Delivery Site, please feel free to give us a call at 1-800-42-MUSIC or visit us online or in person!

Click here for more in the Stanton’s E-Tools series!


THE FORCE AWAKENS for Strings 21 March, 2016

recommended by Dan Clark, Orchestra Specialist

String Orchestra Directors – has your Force Awakened?

Here are your best NEW options for “Star Wars” music for your Spring Orchestra Concert! All are expected to be off the press by the end of March.

STRING ORCHESTRA:
March of the Resistance arr. Paul Lavender (available NOW!)
This distinctive march theme gives string orchestras a terrific concert work that features skilled contrapuntal and fugal style writing. A challenging yet fun experience that mixes early Baroque and Classical style with the power and drama of Star Wars.

Star Wars: The Force Awakens – Soundtrack Highlights arr. James Kazik
James Kazik’s impressive montage spotlights the newest John Williams themes from the film soundtrack, plus the monumental Star Wars main theme. Includes: March of the Resistance; Rey’s Theme; Kylo Ren’s Theme; The Jedi Steps and Finale.

Star Wars Heroes arr. Jerry Brubaker (available NOW!)
This stunning medley arranged by Jerry Brubaker includes popular selections from many of the films. It features the ever recognizable and exciting “Star Wars (Main Title),” the lush and beautiful “Luke and Leia,” the action packed “Battle of the Heroes,” the emotional and lyrical “Han Solo and the Princess,” and to provide a fitting conclusion, the majestic “The Throne Room.”

Themes from Star Wars: The Force Awakens arr. Robert Longfield (available NOW!)
For developing string groups, this accessible medley includes all of the major Star Wars themes heard throughout the newest chapter, including: Star Wars Main Theme; March of the Resistance; Rey’s Theme; The Jedi Steps and Finale.

Rey’s Theme arr. Robert Longfield
Younger groups will love playing this new adventure theme from The Force Awakens. Truly a highlight of John Williams’ new score, “Rey’s Theme” gives a great sense of spirit, adventure, and fantasy that has become of key part of the continuing saga of Star Wars.

FULL ORCHESTRA:
Star Wars: The Force Awakens – Suite for Orchestra by John Williams
Includes 5 concert movements with performance options: I. March of the Resistance; II. Rey’s Theme; III. Scherzo for X-Wings; IV. The Jedi Steps (Concert Version); V. The Jedi Steps and Finale.

Star Wars: The Force Awakens – Soundtrack Suite arr. Sean O’Loughlin
This edition for educational groups brings the drama and beauty of John Williams’ newest film score to the stage for school orchestras. The Star Wars main theme is included, along with brilliant, engaging new music from the soundtrack: March of the Resistance; Rey’s Theme; Kylo Ren’s Theme; The Jedi Steps and Finale.

Selections from Star Wars: The Force Awakens arr. Johnnie Vinson (available NOW!)
From the blockbuster film, John Williams used familiar older themes along with dynamic new material in creating a truly memorable soundtrack. Here is a great sounding medley scored with flexible instrumentation and playable with just about any size ensemble. Featuring the following titles: The Jedi Steps and Finale, Main Title and The Attack on Jakku Village, March of the Resistance, and Rey’s Theme.

Looking for other Pop Music for String Orchestra? These are all off the press and ready for immediate delivery!
Hello arr. Larry Moore
Hey Jude arr. Larry Moore
Learn to Fly arr. Larry Moore
Shut Up and Dance arr. Larry Moore
Shut Up and Dance arr. Mike Story
Ticket to Ride arr. Larry Moore

About the Author:
Dan has worked at Stanton’s since 1979, primarily with orchestra music and print promotions. A “working” musician, he’s a classical cellist, a rock & jazz bassist and a folk & country guitarist/singer. His free time is spent with family or reading, gardening, cycling and working puzzles. His series of musical puzzles (RP3 Rebus Puzzle Picture People) can be found on the Stanton’s Facebook page each Sunday. He also has a reputation as a pretty good joke teller. Seriously.


Urban Music Education: A Practical Guide for Teachers 14 March, 2016

9780199778577Too often, urban music education is seen as “less than” its suburban counterpart. In Urban Music Education: A Practical Guide for Teachersauthor Kate Fitzpatrick-Harnish offers an important corrective that encourages music teachers to focus on students’ strengths as their primary resource. Through a combination of research-based strategies and practical suggestions, she highlights such issues as culturally relevant pedagogy, the “opportunity gap,” race, ethnicity, socioeconomic status, musical content, curricular change, program development, student motivation, and finding inspiration and support. Written for a wide variety of school and community settings, the book challenges all teachers who work in underresourced settings to tailor their pedagogy to meet students’ needs.

Author Kate Fitzpatrick-Harnish is Associate Professor of Music Education at the University of Michigan. An avid supporter of public school music programs, she is the former director of instrumental music at Northland High School in Columbus, Ohio.


NEW for String Orchestra! 30 November, 2015

recommended by Dan C., Orchestra Specialist

As you explore new music for your string orchestra, we trust that you will consider Stanton’s recommendations. You will find them on our mailed promotions, blog, e-blasts, and Stanton’s website: http://www.stantons.com.

Our staff reads through all the new music each year and picks the select few that we feel are educationally valid, provide interesting parts for everyone and will make good concert and festival repertoire. The larger publishers provide many options from which to choose and we always find good literature from among their offerings. The smaller publishers have fewer titles to present, but there are often some real gems among them which we like to point out to teachers who may have missed them in the plethora of publishers’ promotions.

Here are this year’s Stanton’s String Orchestra favorites from some smaller publishers in Grade Level order:

Criancas da Canoa (Canoe Children) – arr. Steven Frackenpohl
9013 – Grade 2 – Kendor Cadet Series – $48.00
Three lively Brazilian children’s songs with shared melodies.

Edge of Silence – Clarence Barber
50250094 – Grade 2 – Ludwig/Masters – $45.00
Slow tumble and flow will increase the maturity of any group.

Elephant’s Trumpet – Clarence Barber
50250097 – Grade 2 – Ludwig/Masters – $48.00
Cool String Bass section feature with “trumpeting” glissandi.

Escape – Kevin Sluder
GMMOR141 – Grade 2 – Grand Mesa Music – $50.00
Developing an intense theme with imitation and overlayments.

Nobody Knows the Trouble I’ve Seen – arr. David Bobrowitz
GMMOR134 – Grade 2 – Grand Mesa Music – $40.00
Emotional, unique setting of a tune said to have brought Lincoln to tears.

Theme with Academic Variations – arr. Jeffrey S. Bishop
3035321 – Grade 2 – Wingert-Jones – $45.00
Demonstrate the precision needed to perform a piece as perfectly as possible.

Down at the Farm – arr. James K. Taylor
GMMOR139 – Grade 3 – Grand Mesa Music – $50.00
Rakes of Mallow and Red Wing with fun, unexpected, imaginative surprises.

Pony Express – Brian Holmes
3035401 – Grade 3 – Wingert-Jones – $50.00
6/8 time and shifting harmonies capture the thrill of the Pony Express.

Brahms Hungarian Dance #1 – Brahms/arr. Frank Rodgers
SO334 – Grade 3-4 – MSB Publishing – $48.00
Slightly simplified, chromatic, G minor Hungarian Dance.

Perpetuoso – Brian Holmes
3035411 – Grade 3.5 – Wingert-Jones – $50.00
Perpetual motion piece with modern harmonies and groovy syncopation.

Diem Jubilate – Elliot Del Borgo
SO335 – Grade 5 – MSB Publishing – $65.00
A modern, challenging processional or impressive concert opener.

About the Author:
Dan C. has worked at Stanton’s since 1979, primarily with orchestra music and print promotions. A “working” musician, he’s a classical cellist, a rock & jazz bassist and a folk & country guitarist/singer. His free time is spent with family or reading, gardening, cycling and working puzzles. His series of musical puzzles (RP3 Rebus Puzzle Picture People) can be found on the Stanton’s Facebook page each Sunday. He also has a reputation as a pretty good joke teller. Seriously.


BEHIND THE SCENES: True Stories from Stanton’s 13 November, 2015

compiled by Dan C., Stanton’s resident staff jokester

qcBjqgxc5In the fall when school cranks back up, Stanton’s gets a huge increase in the number of phone calls and emails requesting all kinds of things. And with so many communications there is naturally an increase in requests, questions and comments that make you go, “Really?!?” Such as:

“I’ve got a high school brass trio that wants to go to Solo and Ensemble competition.
We’re in a state with no required list we have to follow.
The students want to play Johnny Cash’s Ring of Fire. Do you have that for brass trio?” [Really?!?]

“Do you know of any pieces for Alp Horn and Band?” [Really?!?]

“I need a copy of the piano piece Fur Elise by Beethoven – but I need it for harmonica!” [Really?!?]

sax_xmas_decWe’ve mentioned the escalating request in previous blogs. Here’s a recent one:
“I need music for a saxophone quartet” (Okay…)
“To be featured with a concert band” (Ummm…)
“On a Christmas piece!” (Yow!)

Then there are the ones that just make you scratch your head…

“I’m waiting as fast as I can for a Purchase Order number to come from our treasurer.” [How fast can you wait?!?]

“Do you folks carry trumpet muzzles?” [actually, what a great idea!]

Trying to read a teacher’s writing, a customer asked for the Hal Leonard “Interception” book. We knew he meant “Intermediate” and also figured he’s a football fan!

Recent email:
Customer Question – “I have an extensive collection of sheet music. Do you purchase at all?”
Stanton’s Reply – “WE have an extensive collection of sheet music. Do YOU purchase at all?”
After that tongue-in-cheek wisecrack, the employee then went on to explain a bit about how the retail sheet music business works.

Here are a few phone conversations:
Customer: “I found an item I need on your website. The catalog number is HB01”
Stanton’s employee, upon typing the number into the computer and finding that it is a very popular method book for horn by Fred Teuber: “Oh yes – the Teuber book.”
Customer: “No, I think it’s for French Horn!”

Customer with a pronounced southern accent: “I’m looking for Bob and Maria.” (at least that’s what it sounded like!)
Stanton’s employee: “I may not have heard you correctly – Bob and Maria?”
Customer: “No, A-V-E, Ave Maria.”
Stanton’s employee: “Oh, of course! I’m so sorry! Do you want the Bach/Gounod or the Schubert?” JeopardyCustomer: “Heck, I don’t know who writes ’em, I just play ’em!”

Let’s play Jeopardy…
The answer is:
“No sir, I don’t know which arrangement of Amazing Grace you just heard on the bus this morning.”
We’ll let you come up with the question! :)


The Stanton’s Difference: Bring Your Students! 28 October, 2015

by Ken Tilger, Band Education Specialist –

It’s been a while since we’ve added to this series of posts, but we were recently reminded of one more way that Stanton’s is special. Besides making it a road trip to work with our knowledgeable staff, you can also bring your students!

studentsRecently the band director from Versailles High School made the trip to Stanton’s via school bus (comfy!) and brought about 20 of her band students along. While she was previewing OMEA required concert band titles, her students were busy choosing their own solo and ensemble selections from our vast selection. What a great use of time, and a unique experience for the students! Besides finding their solo or ensemble piece with some guidance from their teacher, they were also free to check out a whole host of method and etude books, pop play-alongs, and holiday collections that were on-hand, as well. Honestly, one of the most satisfying feelings I get from state professional (MEA) conferences is seeing the high school all-state musicians excitedly finding repertoire that they want, books they have been recommended, and music just to play with their friends. It’s the ultimate treasure hunt!

Truly budding musicians...

Coffee = Truly budding musicians

While a number of directors visit us on Saturdays or professional days throughout the school year, and some make a summer pilgrimage from nearby states, it is not unusual for us to see a school bus full of students pull into our parking lot about once or twice a year (don’t worry, we only cower briefly). After a quick “lay-of-the-land” tour, we are happy to turn them loose to shop, and they are welcome to take advantage of our first-hand instrumental knowledge, as well. We often hear from educators who have moved on to other states that they do not have a music supplier like Stanton’s even within driving distance, and many do not let customers freely browse all of their titles. Besides having directors take advantage of stopping by the store, what can be better than bringing aspiring musicians (and tomorrow’s teachers!) to musical Candy Land!?

About the Author:
Ken is a former band director, and has been with Stanton’s since 2004. He always feels the urge to read Edgar Allan Poe, the original novels featuring traditional Hollywood monsters, and other macabre tales this time of year, yet never does.


Instruments A to Z 20 July, 2015

250px-Tambores-El-Power170px-Croix_Sonore_Jon_B_1Welcome to month #3 of “Instruments A to Z!  As promised, the instruments presented will not be common ones.  The first instrument is an electronic instrument called a croix sonore.  A prototype of this Nicolai Obukhov invention was built in France in 1926 by Pierre Dauvillier.  It functioned along the same lines as a theremin.  Obukhov wrote music for the croix sonore which was played by one of his students, Marie-Antoinette Aussenac-Broglie.  Next are the Candombe drums, actually a set of three to four drums. Each of the drums has its own size, voice, and function in the ensemble.  Last is the celesta, in instrument that is just over 100 years old.  It was invented in 1886 by Auguste Mustel.  It is a small keyboard instrument most famously used by Tschaikovsky in The Nutcracker’s “The Dance of the Sugarplum Fairy“.  A concert band arrangement of Harry Potter movie themes also uses a celesta at the beginning of the piece for “Hedwig’s Theme”. Contact us at 1-800-42-MUSIC, email us at keyboard@stantons.com, or visit our website if you have questions or if you are looking for something special.  Shop Stanton’s for all your sheet music needs!


String Orchestra Spoiler Alert 10 June, 2015

recommended by Dan Clark, School Orchestra Specialist

Not off the press yet, but coming soon from Alfred publishing, here are some of the standouts in our perusal of scores and listening to Fall 2015 titles.  It is likely that these titles will be on  Stanton’s Summer Reading Sessions at the Ohio State University String Teacher Workshop, July 5 – July 11.

All of the following selections are original compositions.  They contain great teaching opportunities, everyone has interesting parts and they will be great crowd-pleasers at concerts.

impactImpact by Bob Phillips  (43851)……………………………….$56.00

A truly powerful concert piece that honors the impact teachers have on the lives of others, this original work is a perfect centerpiece for concert and festival programming. Rhythmically exciting, with great parts for all sections, this is a must-have. (4:30)

pi tunes

Pi Tunes by Richard Meyer (43825)……………………………………………………..$62.00

Try assigning the first 32 digits of Pi to a scale degree to create five melodies that flow together, and you’ll have a start to this awesome composition. With a light jazzy feel, driving accompaniments, and features of all sections, here’s another creative hit from the master. (4:20)

river rhapsodyRiver Rhapsody by Richard Meyer (43843)……………….$49.00

A great way to introduce students to tone painting, this unique and fun-to-play selection traces the path of an imaginary river, which begins as a tiny spring and gradually grows. Themes from three famous “river pieces” are included: “The Beautiful Blue Danube,” “Water Music,” and “The Moldau.” (4:00)

city of steel

 

City of Steel by Doug Spata (43827)………………………………………………………$56.00

Brooding melodies that rise like mist over dark, churning chords, give way to a warm, yearning section, returning for a rousing finish. The lush, romantic sound and the dramatic expressiveness thrill while technical development includes 16th notes, chromatics, and shifting. (4:30)

 mystereMystere by Shirl Jae Atwell (43840)………………………………………………………………………$49.00

“Arousing wonder and inquisitiveness”—that is mystère. And this piece exemplifies, through music, the wonder and incomprehension of a mystery with melodies and counter melodies throughout. (3:15)

 

matadorMatador by Susan H. Day (43829)…………………………………………………………$49.00

Picture the matador as he waves his red cape and the crowd cheers him on!  Distinguished by its Spanish influenced melodies and harmonies, this piece in 4/4 is written in D minor and E minor. Great to develop expressive playing! (3:30)

 

 

Pre-order your copies today on our website or by calling us at 1-800-42-MUSIC, extension 2.  Questions?  Email orchestra@stantons.com!

Dan Clark has worked at Stanton’s since 1979, primarily with orchestra music and print promotions.  A “working” musician, he’s a classical cellist, a rock & jazz bassist and a folk & country guitarist/singer. His free time is spent with family or reading, gardening, cycling and working puzzles. His series of musical puzzles (RP3 Rebus Puzzle Picture People) can be found on the Stanton’s Facebook page each Sunday.  He also has a reputation as a pretty good joke teller. Seriously.


The Stanton’s Difference: 21 Day Trial 01 June, 2015

At Stanton’s, we know you have many choices when it comes to purchasing sheet music.  Over the next few weeks, we want to take the opportunity to highlight just a few of the many reasons why Stanton’s is the best place to buy music for your school, church, private studio or personal use!

Stanton’s is one of the largest sheet music retailers in the country, with tens of thousands of titles in stock.  We understand that many of our customers can’t make it to our Columbus, Ohio location to peruse music, so we offer a 21 Day Trial service.

How It Works-Music can be secured with either a Stanton’s account or a credit card.  We send you the in-stock materials you request,  and you pay nothing but the shipping and handling costs.  As long as the music is returned to us in NEW condition within 21 days, you are never charged.  If you have specific titles you’d like to see, we will happily send those to you, or you can ask one of our knowledgeable staff members to select pieces for you based on concert theme, performance venue, type of group, etc.

What You Can Take On Trial (by department):

Choral, Handbell, Classroom General Music & Solo Vocal-You may take up to 20 single copies of octavos and/or up to 5 musicals, collections, or director’s scores.

Band, Orchestra and Instrumental-You may take up to six items on trial, including full arrangements, solos and chamber ensembles.  (Only scores will be sent for titles appearing on the OMEA High School Large Group Contest List.)

Piano/Keyboard-Up to five collections and/or 10 teaching pieces, one copy each.  Popular sheet music is not available for 21 Day Trial.  75% (by dollar amount) of the piano music on trial must be purchased.

For more details about our 21 Day Trial, visit us online at www.stantons.com, or give us a call at 1-800-42-MUSIC!

Previous posts in this series:  10% Educational Discount; Knowledgeable Staff


You Want Me to Teach WHAT?!?!? 29 May, 2015

you want me to teach whatWe specialize in panicked phone calls here at Stanton’s.  We’ve heard it all:  “I lost my judge’s copy!”  “I can’t find my Messiah!”  “It’s Christmas Eve and my O, Holy Night is nowhere to be found!”  These examples of immediate panic pale in comparison to another problem we’ve heard more and more about over the last couple of years.  Dazed choral, orchestral and band teachers, many with years of experience, come in and tell us they’ve been assigned to teach elementary general music.  Educators who don’t bat an eyelash at breaking up fights between high school boys in the lunch room or dealing with middle school girl drama are petrified of a classroom full of bright-eyed kindergarteners.

Never fear, Mari Schay and Michael Tolon have come to the rescue.  These self-described “recovering band directors” have successfully made the transition from upper level music teachers to elementary teachers.  In “You Want Me To Teach WHAT?” the authors guide you through this transition, dealing with such diverse topics as:

  • Your own emotions about your new assignment-negative and positive.
  • Getting to know the school, the kids, and the environment.
  • Learning styles and philosophies of elementary general music.
  • Playing instruments, singing, listening, reading and notating, and assessing.

There are also sample lesson plans for every grade level, and appendices about routine and purchasing materials.  The bonus part of this reference is that it is a joy to read.  Mari and Michael share their mistakes as well as their triumphs in a casual, conversational style that is funny enough to make you feel like you’re reading for pleasure instead of work.  If you are facing this challenge in your teaching career, or are a first year teacher who didn’t expect to be teaching this level, give us a call at 1-800-42-MUSIC and order a copy today.

You Want Me To Teach WHAT? (42787)……………………………………………………………………………..$19.99

Rachel Steele has been at Stanton’s since 2013. She previously taught middle school and high school band and choir for 13 years, and holds Bachelor’s and Master’s degrees in music education from The Ohio State University. Currently a member of the Heisey Wind Ensemble and a musician at Epiphany Lutheran Church (Pickerington OH), Rachel also enjoys reading, sewing, baking and the Pittsburgh Steelers!


Music Major Graduation Gifts – String Players 11 May, 2015

The world of a musician or collegiate music major is often foreign and strange to those outside of the profession.  Parents, family and friends are often at a loss as to what graduation gifts might be most useful to high school graduates who plan to major in music, or college graduates pursuing music as a profession.   The members of our knowledgeable staff at Stanton’s have all been in their shoes, and we recommend these gifts (in a variety of price ranges,) we could have used when we graduated!

For High School Students becoming String College Music Majors:

So You Want To Be a Music Major by Robert Franzblau (00121797)……………………$14.99

so you want to be a music majorThere’s a famous story about a music professor who looked at his or her entry level theory class of bright-eyed freshman on the first day and said, “Look to your left.  Now look to your right.  One of these people won’t be here by the end of the semester.”  Success as a music major depends greatly on a number of factors, sometimes the least of which is talent or ability.  Go in prepared with this book about how to make a successful transition from high school musician to collegiate music student.

 

Harvard Dictionary of Music (0674011635)……………………………………………………………..$54.99

harvard dictionary of musicWe know, we know, there’s an app for that.  Sometimes, though, you can’t beat an old fashioned reference book.  This is the standard against which all other music dictionaries are measured, and every professional has one on their shelves.

 

Strings Attached (00124967)………………………………………………………………..$24.99

strings attachedEvery college student has a crisis moment when they wonder “What did I get myself into?  I can’t do this!  It’s too much!”  Give an inspiring story to read in this moment of self-doubt.  Jerry Kupchynsky, known as Mr. K, was a Ukrainian-born taskmaster who yelled and stomped and screamed, and who drove his students harder than anyone had ever driven them before. Through sheer force of will, he made them better than they had any right to be. Strings Attached tells the inspiring, poignant, and powerful story of this remarkable man, whose life seemed to conspire against him at every turn and yet who was able to transform his own heartache into triumph for his students.

For College Music Majors becoming New String Teachers:

Strategies for Teaching Strings (0199857227)………………………………………………….$64.95
Orchestral Bowings and Routines (0899176062)………………………………………………$21.99
Basic String Maintenance:  A Teacher’s Guide (1974S)……………………………………..$21.99
String Teaching in America: Strategies for a Diverse Society (0739076396)…….$22.99
ASTA (American String Teachers Association) Curriculum (0615439013)……….$49.99
String Clinics To Go: Art of Recruiting DVD (SCG1DVD)…………………………………..$34.95
String Clinics To Go: Getting Started DVD (SCG2DVD)…………………………………….$34.95

Dan Clark has worked at Stanton’s since 1979, primarily with orchestra music and print promotions.  A “working” musician, he’s a classical cellist, a rock & jazz bassist and a folk & country guitarist/singer. His free time is spent with family or reading, gardening, cycling and working puzzles. His series of musical puzzles (RP3 Rebus Puzzle Picture People) can be found on the Stanton’s Facebook page each Sunday.  He also has a reputation as a pretty good joke teller. Seriously.


Graduation Music For Band and Orchestra 08 May, 2015

Uh-oh….Did you forget graduation is around the corner?  Order a new copy of your old standby so you’re sure to have all the parts, or try something new this year!  The instrumental department at Stanton’s keeps plenty of copies in stock so give us a call today!

Best-Selling Arrangements for Concert Band:

Academic Processional & Recessionalarr. Robert W. Smith & Ed Huckeby
012-3874-00 – Grade 3 – $72.00
At last, a fresh and welcome new treatment of the ceremonial “must-haves” – Pomp and Circumstance and Sine Nomine – for the Grade 3 level! Skillfully scored for success even with limited instrumentation, they nevertheless sound full and solid, with some inspired creative touches.
crown imperial

Crown Imperial William Walton/W.J. Duthoit  – 48010656 – Grade 4/5 – $120.00
This “old warhorse” will give your upper level bands something to challenge them right up until the end of the school year.


Fanfare and Processional/Fanfare and Recessional
– by Edward Elgar/arr. James D. Ployhar – BD00492 – Grade 3 – $65.00
THE standard for over 40 years! Featuring Elgar’s Pomp and Circumstance, as well as original fanfares and a recessional by James D. Ployhar, this arrangement is a staple of high school band libraries across the country.

Other options for Concert Band

Pomp and Circumstance Elgar/Stanton (Build-a-Band Series with flexible instrumentation) – 026-4066-00 – Grade 3 – $50.00

Pomp and Circumstance Marches Elgar/Williams (themes from all 4 Elgar marches in the Alfred Challenger Series) – 22252- Grade 2 – $48.00
Pomp and Circumstance/RecessionalElgar/Hill & Elledge (correlates with the Best in Class Band Method Book 2) – GB865 – Grade 2 – $40.00

For Full Orchestra-

Crown ImperialWalton/Stone (graduation warhorse for better orchestras) – GMCL013 – Grade 4-5 – $70.00
Pomp and Circumstance Elgar/Whitney (close to original, but somewhat easier) – 33680 -Grade 3.5 – $58.00

For String Orchestra-

Pomp and Circumstance Elgar/Del Borgo (very playable version from an established arranger) – BSO9703 – Grade 2-3 – $45.00
Pomp and CircumstanceElgar/Frost (nice and easy, but still sounds complete) – SO246C – Grade 2.5 – $45.00


Behind the Scenes – True Stories from the Stanton’s Staff 06 May, 2015

questioning girlquestioning girlLife has a way of supplying incidents that make you want to scratch your head in amused bewilderment!  Here are some true “Stanton’s Stories” that made us ask the proverbial question, “?!?!?”

A customer who directs a community band called to order single parts to dozens of band pieces.  Why?  His second trumpet player had his house broken into and the thief not only took valuable musical instruments and equipment, but also stole his 2nd trumpet folder. – ?!?!?

A professionally dressed woman came in to the store to buy a beginning violin book for her child.  This being her first experience, she asked, in all innocence, “What happens when we’re done with the book – do you buy them back?” – ?!?!?

Apparently some people are so sure that “big brother is watching” that they don’t feel the need to provide any pertinent information we could use to help them.  We got an anonymous email from a customer that simply said, “wrong cd.” -?!?!?

We got a call from a school band director who said, “I’ve been calling everyplace to find this piece that’s not published yet – do you have it?” – !!!?

Whatever happened to “Thou Shalt Not Steal?”  Someone once tried to use a stolen credit card to order some sacred church music. – ?!?!?

A school music teacher ordered some classroom books via email and wrote, “We have a new middle school building, so do not send the music to the old 123 Main Street address.”  However, she didn’t feel the need to tell us the new address. -?!?!?

When a fellow ordered some unusual manuscript paper online, we were concerned since it was a very specialized paper that had to be ordered in from Germany.  It was expensive and could take several weeks to import.  We contacted the customer to relay this information and to confirm that this was the product he was hoping to get. He said, “Oh no, just send any staff paper.  I’m a drummer and want to write down some rhythms!” – ?!?!?


Behind the Scenes: April Fools….Or Is It? 28 April, 2015

by Dan Clark, String Music Specialist

One of the interesting phenomena in the retail sheet music business is the way that requests for music can sometimes go downhill fast as more focused criteria is added.  Here are some actual Stanton’s customer requests that “went south” rather quickly.  (If you’re wondering, sometimes we come up with a solution, sometimes we don’t.  Click the picture to find out what we recommended.)

hip hip christmasI need a children’s Christmas musical. (Great!)
It’s for church so it needs to be sacred. (Fine!)
The students range from 3rd to 12th grade. (Okay…)
It needs to have rap and hip-hop elements. (Yikes!)

 

oboe and viola

I need an instrumental duet. (Great!)
It’s for adults, so it really needs to be advanced. (Fine!)
It’s for church, so it really should be sacred. (Okay…)
It needs to be written for oboe and viola. (Yikes!)

 

flight of the bumblebee fluteI need Flight of the Bumblebee. (Great!)
I need a version for flute. (Fine!)
It’s for a student. (Okay…)
It needs to be real easy. (Yikes!)

 

snare drum

I need a solo for a college audition. (Great!)
I need it for snare drum. (Fine!)
It needs to come with a CD. (Okay…)
So I’ll know how it goes. (Yikes!)

 

violaI need a viola solo. (Great!)
It’s for a good player, so it needs to be advanced. (Fine!)
We want to feature the violist with our group, (Okay…)
Which is a community concert band. (Yikes!)

 

gregorian chantI need a piece for choir.  (Great!)
I’d like some Gregorian chant. (Fine!)
It’s for a student group (Okay…)
of elementary school children. (Yikes!)

 

rainbow connectionI need a song from The Muppet Movie (Great!)
It’s called Rainbow Connection. (Fine!)
I want to play it, not sing it. (Okay…)
Does it come in banjo tablature? (Yikes!)

 

kreislerI need a piece of violin music. (Great!)
It’s written by Fritz Kreisler. (Fine!)
My teacher didn’t tell me the title. (Okay…)
She said it’s the “famous one.” (Yikes!)

 

ruthI need some incidental music for a church play. (Great!)
Something with flexible instrumentation (Fine!)
It needs to fit the time period of the play (Okay…)
Which is the Old Testament story of Ruth (Yikes!)

 

Dan Clark has worked at Stanton’s since 1979, primarily with orchestra music and print promotions.  A “working” musician, he’s a classical cellist, a rock & jazz bassist and a folk & country guitarist/singer. His free time is spent with family or reading, gardening, cycling and working puzzles. His series of musical puzzles (RP3 Rebus Puzzle Picture People) can be found on the Stanton’s Facebook page each Sunday.  He also has a reputation as a pretty good joke teller. Seriously.


NEW!!!! G. Schirmer Violin Anthology 10 April, 2015

G. Schirmer Violin Anthology – 24 Works from the 20th and 21st Centuries

recommended by Dan Clark, String Specialist

g schirmer violin anthologyDo you have advanced students to whom you would like to introduce some “modern” composers without spending an arm and a leg on a sonata or concerto from a single writer?  This new collection is for you!  Subtitled “A Variety of Approachable Music for the Advanced Player” these are 24 short pieces or movements from larger works that have been gathered together for study and/or performance.  Selections are  from such prominent composers as Samuel Barber, Lili Boulanger, John Corigliano, Paul Creston, Bernard Heiden, Karel Husa, Charles Ives, Aram Khachaturian, Boruslav Martinu, Walter Piston, Andre Previn, Sergei Prokofiev, Bright Sheng, Augusta Read Thomas, Virgil Thomson, and Joan Tower and others.  There are also nine enthralling pages of notes about the pieces and their composers as well as the dates they were written and first performed, some even written by the composers themselves.  Five of the pieces are unaccompanied, but the other 19 have a piano part included.  The music is quite challenging as you might expect, but well worth working on, not only to learn some contemporary literature but also to open your students’ ears to modern melodic and harmonic concepts.

G. Schirmer Violin Anthology – 24 Works from the 20th and 21st Century  (50498777)……………….$24.99

Dan Clark has worked at Stanton’s since 1979, primarily with orchestra music and print promotions.  A “working” musician, he’s a classical cellist, a rock & jazz bassist and a folk & country guitarist/singer. His free time is spent with family or reading, gardening, cycling and working puzzles. His series of musical puzzles (RP3 Rebus Puzzle Picture People) can be found on the Stanton’s Facebook page each Sunday.  He also has a reputation as a pretty good joke teller. Seriously.