News & Views Thursday, July 31, 2014

Category: Concert Band

Band Directors Teaching Choir-SAB or SATB? 29 July, 2014

Here at Stanton’s12VBF_ConspirareHandel, we’re aware of the rising number of music teachers working outside of their specialty.  Cutbacks have forced many instrumental specialists to begin teaching choir-but never fear!  In this series, we will try to give some advice on where to start, as well as recommending some “tried and true” products that will help you become a great choral educator!

SATB is the standard voicing for high school mixed choirs and SAB/3-Part Mixed arrangements have the same designation at the middle school level.  However,  a teacher’s world is rarely perfect.  There are many reasons why you might have a need to use SAB pieces in a high school or SATB pieces in a middle school.

If one or more of the following apply to your high school singers….

-You have less than half as many men as women; putting the men on the same part will balance the group

-Your male singers are inexperienced enough that  they need the strength in numbers

-You are working on a new concept (language, choreography, etc.) and want to simplify the number of parts

…you may want to try one of these excellent SAB pieces:

Canon of Praise – Pachelbel, arr. Hal Hopson – MW1226

Der Tanz – Schubert, arr. Patrick Liebergen – BL382

Die Nachtigall – Schubert, arr. Russell Robinson – 08501705

Elijah – Dan Davison – 00126742

Praise the Lord – Handel, arr. Hal Hopson – 35017273

Sicut Cervus – Palestrina, arr. Russell Robinson – 31089

If one or more of the following apply to your middle school group…

-The young men in your choir are overpowering the light, healthy sound of your middle school women

-You have enough men that they are able to sing 2 different parts and still balance your women

-You have boys whose voices are changing in different ways; some still comfortable in a cambiata range and some who have temporarily lost their mid-range (from about A below middle C to E above)

-You teach in a junior high instead of middle school and have 7th, 8th and 9th graders in the same group

…you may want to try one of these beginner SATB pieces:

Adoramus Te – Emily Crocker – 08740061

Beachcombers – Amy Bernon – 15/2538H

Bound for Jubilee –  Joyce Eilers – SV7903

Come to Me, O My Love – Allan Petker – HMC997

Going Over Home – Sonja Poorman – BL334

Hush! Somebody’s Callin’ My Name – Dennard Brazeal – 35009892

Song of the Sea – Raymond Hannisian – SV7802

Three Madrigals – Emma Lou Diemer – 48003439

Hope Is Like the Wind – Ruth Elaine Schram – 15/2677H

Remember, voicing does not always indicate difficulty level.  With some sleuthing you can find appropriate pieces for all ages in a variety of voicings.

Still not sure what to choose?  Don’t be shy about asking for help, especially if you are new to the choral world.  As always, the experienced choral directors at Stanton’s are thrilled to help you select materials, make recommendations, or give advice.    Contact us at 1-800-42-MUSIC, extension 1 or visit our store.  We look forward to seeing you soon!

Previous posts in this series: Warm-Ups and Rounds; Sight-Singing; SAB or 3 Part Mixed; Help! I’m Not a Pianist!; Solo and Ensemble Pt. 1; Solo and Ensemble Pt. 2


The Stanton’s Difference: Big Enough to Serve Your Needs; Small Enough to Serve You 28 July, 2014

At Stanton’s, we know you have many choices when it comes to purchasing sheet music.  Over the past few weeks, we’ve been highlighting just a few of the many reasons why Stanton’s is the best place to buy music for your school, church, private studio or personal use!

We’re Big Enough to Serve Your Needs-
*
Stanton’s Sheet Music has direct access to all major and many minor, independent, and European publishers allowing us to carry and order hundreds of thousands of print music titles for you.

*Stanton’s e-Tools are designed to make your job easier. Use our Listening Library, Jukebox, Virtual Workshop, Wish List, and Digital Delivery features to compare and organize titles for your music program. Watch for our upcoming blog series spotlighting each of our e-Tool features.

*Itemized purchase orders, bids, and large orders are no problem. We work with a number of schools around the country and U.S. International schools who “bulk order” over the summer.

*Besides providing music to customers all over the country, access to publishers like Hal Leonard and Alfred combined with stantons.com gives Stanton’s Sheet Music global reach with numerous international orders and worldwide shipping destinations.

But Small Enough to Serve YOU-
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Stanton’s Sheet Music is still a single, family-owned store in downtown Columbus, Ohio. We do not have a warehouse or call center, and our website is just another way to shop for music with Stanton’s.

*We have 3 departments each with a specific number of dedicated, specialized staff: Choral & General Music, Band & Orchestra, and Keyboard & Pop. While anyone in a respective department can help you, if you find a specific staff member you like to work with, feel free to request them.

*We are your customer service. We answer your phone calls and e-mails. We fill your orders and process your internet orders. We personally handle your “sheet music emergencies.” We solve any problems should they arise. We will get to know you by name, and by working with you over time, get to know your program.

*We are your partner in music education. We choose Stanton’s Suggestions and Top Choices to make your job easier. We organize and conduct Stanton’s numerous clinics, workshops and reading sessions. We develop Stanton’s e-Tools with you, the music teacher, in mind.

We hope that over the course of this series we have given you some reasons to make Stanton’s your #1 choice for sheet music. If not, give us a call or place an order with us, and see why Stanton’s Sheet Music has been Sheet Music Specialists since 1960!

Previous posts in this series: 10% Educational Discount, Knowledgeable Staff, 21 Day Trial, For New Teachers, Setting Up Accounts, Make It a Road Trip!, Going the Extra Mile


The Stanton’s Difference: Going the Extra Mile 21 July, 2014

At Stanton’s, we know you have many choices when it comes to purchasing sheet music.  Over the past few weeks, we’ve been highlighting just a few of the many reasons why Stanton’s is the best place to buy music for your school, church, private studio or personal use!  Today we’d like to spotlight a couple of ways the Stanton’s staff goes above and beyond for you.

So you want to program an old title. You call us to order it, or place your order at stantons.com. While taking/processing your order, our knowledgeable staff realizes the age of the title, either because we remember when it was published (yes, many of us have been here that long), or we’re tipped off by the catalog number – in fact, old Belwin/Columbia Pictures numbers contain the year of publication within them. Rather than just place the title on backorder, and hope it comes in, we often check the availability of old titles in real time! The Alfred and Hal Leonard dealer websites allow us to check the status of a title, and, if it is urgent, we are happy to call our representatives with other publishers on your behalf. This way you know as soon as possible whether you can expect to receive your title, or if you need to consider programming another piece. Sure, we hate to disappoint, but we’d rather you know sooner than later if a piece is unavailable so you can plan accordingly.

You need music in a hurry! Despite your best planning, sometimes music and scores get lost before an impending performance or an administrator/civic leader requests a specific title that’s not in your library for performance at the end of the week. If you find yourself in a “sheet music emergency,” Stanton’s can help! First, if the music you need is in-stock, we will strive to get it out the same day as long as we have your order before 4:30 pm, and we’ll work with you to find the right balance of expedited shipping time and cost. If your item is not in-stock, we can arrange for drop-ship service directly from most publishers so that your music will ship within 24 hours. If your timetable is REALLY urgent, we will personally call your drop-ship order in to the publisher to ensure that it is handled properly and shipped the same day – most publishers can get expedited orders out the same day if they are placed by noon or 12:30 local (publisher) time.  We strongly recommend that if you need to place an expedited or drop-ship order that you call us asap so that we can give your order the detailed attention it requires, and you the service you deserve!

Does your sheet music store do this? If not, give us a call and see why Stanton’s Sheet Music has been the “Sheet Music Specialist”  for over 50 years, and why you should shop Stanton’s for all your sheet music needs!

Previous posts in this series: 10% Educational Discount, Knowledgeable Staff, 21 Day Trial, For New Teachers, Setting Up Accounts, Make It a Road Trip!


Band Directors Teaching Choir: Solo and Ensemble Pt. 2 15 July, 2014

Here at Stanton’s12VBF_ConspirareHandel, we’re aware of the rising number of music teachers working outside of their specialty.  Cutbacks have forced many instrumental specialists to begin teaching choir-but never fear!  In this series, we will try to give some advice on where to start, as well as recommending some “tried and true” products that will help you become a great choral educator!

Just when you’ve gotten comfortable with the daily running of your choral group(s), it’s time to begin preparing for Solo and Ensemble festivals. The general procedures for vocal and instrumental music are often similar, but there are some differences that new choral teachers should be aware of.  This post will focus on small ensembles.

Conducting-Depending on the size of the ensemble, a conductor may or may not be allowed, so consider the difficulty of entrances and phrase endings when choosing music.  Be sure to have at least one student who is able to give small conducting gestures for starting, stopping, and changes of tempo.

Doubling Parts-Unlike a brass quintet or a flute trio, most vocal ensembles allow for parts to be doubled.  Usually there is a limit to the number of singers in an ensemble, but more than one singer may be on a part.

Pianists-Don’t forget to engage an accompanist for your groups.  Unless they are singing a cappella, vocal groups will need an accomplished accompanist.  If you must use a CD or electronic accompaniment, be sure your selection has a CD available.

Literature-Small vocal ensembles use the same music as a large choir of the same voicing.  For example, a 3 part women’s ensemble (SSA) could use the same music as your women’s choir; a mixed group could use the same SATB music as your mixed choir.  Not all pieces work well for small groups though, so use your state’s music list as a guide or check our website for suggestions .

As always, individual states’ rules vary.  Please check your state rule book  for more information.

Still not sure what to choose?  Don’t be shy about asking for help, especially if you are new to the choral world.  As always, the experienced choral directors at Stanton’s are thrilled to help you select materials, make recommendations, or give advice.    Contact us at 1-800-42-MUSIC, extension 1 or visit our store.  We look forward to seeing you soon!

Previous posts in this series: Warm-Ups and Rounds; Sight-Singing; SAB or 3 Part Mixed; Help! I’m Not a Pianist!; Solo and Ensemble Pt. 1


The Stanton’s Difference: Make It A Road Trip!! 14 July, 2014

At Stanton’s, we know you have many choices when it comes to purchasing sheet music.  Over the next few weeks, we want to take the opportunity to highlight just a few of the many reasons why Stanton’s is the best place to buy music for your school, church, private studio or personal use!

Places where you can browse and buy A LOT of sheet music are hard to come by. It’s amazing how many times we hear, “It’s so nice to be able to look at music before you buy it,” and “I live in                                              , and there is nowhere like this to buy music.”  This last statement includes cities like New York and Los Angeles, and has been made by some of the touring Broadway Across America musicians who come through Columbus.  If you live within driving distance of Columbus, and you’re wondering if a trip to Stanton’s is worth it the answer is “absolutely!”

Who doesn’t love a road trip? We’re not as far away as you might think. Columbus is only a 2 hour drive from Cleveland and Cincinnati, and 3 hours from Indianapolis, Pittsburgh, Lexington and some of the farther reaches of Ohio. Besides, Stanton’s Sheet Music is in a former A&P grocery store (complete with cupola) that has hundreds of thousands of sheet music titles in stock!

While you’re here, you are welcome to look through and compare all of the music that’s on hand. You can pull up a chair at our listening station or use the Stanton’s app on your smart phone to scan titles and listen to them throughout the store. If it’s your first time at Stanton’s, let us know – we’ll give you a tour! Did we mention that you can also take advantage of our knowledgeable staff, too?

Need to grab lunch, or staying in town for dinner? In addition to sheet music suggestions, our staff can recommend plenty of great, non-chain places to grab a bite. Within walking distance are Dirty Frank’s, Little Palace, The Jury Room, Katzinger’s Delicatessen, and Indian Oven, as well as Mikey’s Late Night Slice and Jeni’s Splendid Ice Creams at the Columbus Commons (and you’ve got to try Jeni’s!)  Also nearby are plenty of restaurants in German Village, on Gay Street, and in the Short North and Arena Districts.

“My spouse will be bored/we have the kids with us.” Guess what? Your spouse/kids can take advantage of the many attractions Columbus has to offer while you shop, or plan a whole day or overnight trip for some quality family time. Downtown destinations include programs at the Columbus Metropolitan Library, PB & Jazz kids’ concerts, COSI, the Santa Maria, Ohio Statehouse tours, and the Columbus Museum of Art, as well as events at the downtown theaters like the CAPA Summer Movie Series and Broadway Across America. The Columbus Commons hosts many events including food trucks on Thursdays, Commons for Kids on Fridays (with free carousel rides!), and the Columbus Symphony Pops concerts. Also nearby are the North Market, Franklin Park Conservatory, Crew Stadium, and the Columbus Clippers at Huntington Park – a fantastic venue to take in a ballgame, the Columbus skyline, and eat City Barbeque!  Other annual events include the Columbus Arts Festival, Actors’ Theatre performances, the Ohio State Fair (July 23-Aug. 3), and the upcoming Jazz & Ribs Festival (July 18-20). Within driving distance are shopping at Easton Town Center and Polaris Fashion Place, as well as the renowned Columbus Zoo and Aquarium featuring the newly added Heart of Africa region, and Zoombezi Bay water park.

Have we given you enough reasons to come to Columbus and visit us? We look forward to seeing you soon!

Previous posts in this series: 10% Educational Discount, Knowledgeable Staff, 21 Day Trial, For New Teachers, Setting Up Accounts


The Stanton’s Difference: Setting Up Accounts Is Easy! 07 July, 2014

At Stanton’s, we know you have many choices when it comes to purchasing sheet music.  Over the next few weeks, we want to take the opportunity to highlight just a few of the many reasons why Stanton’s is the best place to buy music for your school, church, private studio or personal use!

If you’re a school, church or community music director, your purchases are usually made to an account to be paid by your institution. If you are new to any of these positions, or have recently changed gigs, give us a call! We will be happy to provide you with your organization’s account number(s), and walk you through the billing process.

Are you new to shopping with Stanton’s? Rest easy – our staff can check to see if your organization already has an account (many often do), and if not, setting up a new account is easy! In fact, we can help you set up a new account when you place your first order, or make your first purchase, in a matter of minutes!

What we need:
- Name of the organization to be billed
- Billing address
- Billing phone number
- Purchase order number (if required by billing institution)

Let us know where you would like to have your order shipped, and you’re done!

Some notes:
*
Stanton’s can bill your: School Board/District; Church; School Building Activity Fund; Booster organization; Community Band/Choir organization

*We can assign multiple ship-to addresses and institutional credit cards to your account.

*You can bill orders to your account at our store, over the phone, at stantons.com, or at any conference or reading session where we’re exhibiting!

If you have any questions, give us a call at 1-800-42-MUSIC and speak with our sales staff, or press 4 to speak directly with our accounting department, and shop Stanton’s for all your sheet music needs!

 

Previous posts in this series: 10% Educational Discount, Knowledgeable Staff, 21 Day Trial, For New Teachers

Band Directors Teaching Choir-Solo and Ensemble Pt. 1 01 July, 2014

Here at Stanton’s12VBF_ConspirareHandel, we’re aware of the rising number of music teachers working outside of their specialty.  Cutbacks have forced many instrumental specialists to begin teaching choir-but never fear!  In this series, we will try to give some advice on where to start, as well as recommending some “tried and true” products that will help you become a great choral educator!

Just when you’ve gotten comfortable with the daily running of your choral group(s), it’s time to begin preparing for Solo and Ensemble festivals. The general procedures for vocal and instrumental music are often similar, but there are some differences that new choral teachers should be aware of.  This post will focus on solo literature.

Memorization-Unlike instrumental events, vocal events must be memorized.  Though a piece might seem easy on the surface, the memorization of text and/or musical elements can be an issue for some.  Consider the number of verses, language,  and the difficulty of entrances or phrase endings when thinking about a student’s ability to memorize.

Pianists-An accomplished accompanist is extremely important, especially when young singers are involved.  While a live accompanist is always best, many standard vocal collections now come with a CD.  This can be an invaluable tool for a student who may not get much rehearsal time with an accompanist or instructor.  Click here to see a selection of collections available with accompaniment CD’s.

Literature-While most instrumental solos are available as singles, most vocal literature can be found in collections.   These budget-stretching books can have many solos that appear on your state list, often at different difficulty levels and/or in different ranges.  Don’t forget to order an original copy for the accompanist as well.  Click here to see our best-selling vocal collections.  For students in junior high/middle school, check out our previous blog post on this topic.

As always, individual states’ rules vary.  Please check your state rule book  for more information.

Still not sure which collections to invest in?  Don’t be shy about asking for help, especially if you are new to the choral world.  As always, the experienced choral directors at Stanton’s are thrilled to help you select materials, make recommendations, or give advice.    Contact us at 1-800-42-MUSIC, extension 1 or visit our store.  We look forward to seeing you soon!

Previous posts in this series: Warm-Ups and Rounds; Sight-Singing; SAB or 3 Part Mixed; Help! I’m Not a Pianist!

The Stanton’s Difference: For New Teachers 30 June, 2014

At Stanton’s, we know you have many choices when it comes to purchasing sheet music.  Over the next few weeks, we want to take the opportunity to highlight just a few of the many reasons why Stanton’s is the best place to buy music for your school, church, private studio or personal use!

The staff at Stanton’s understands the stresses and pressures of the first year of teaching.  Getting to know your building or district, discipline, lesson plans, common core, evaluations, booster groups, budgets/purchasing, scheduling….oh, yeah, and actually teaching!  We’d like to make your life just a little bit easier, and here’s what we can do to help:

Money Matters-Requisitions, purchase orders, board accounts, booster accounts; it can all seem “Greek to you” if you’re not familiar with school purchasing.  Visit or call us as soon as you are hired to determine what kind of account(s) your school has and what you have to do to get music.  Don’t be shy, ask lots of questions now!

We’re Happy To Meet You-Come on down and visit us in person.  Introduce yourself to the staff, let us know what and where you’re teaching.  We can give you a short tour of the store and let you know what kinds of products we have that fit your needs.  We’ll also be happy to send you home with any current promotional materials or a 21 Day Trial so you can choose literature at your leisure.

So Much Music, So Little Time-The tens of thousands titles that we have in stock can be a bit overwhelming for anyone.  The music educators on our staff can steer you in the right direction, offering suggestions for all types of classes and ensembles at all levels. We spend hundreds of hours each year reviewing new publications, so we show you only the best of what’s out there.

E-Tools-Stanton’s website has several different e-tools to assist you in choosing, purchasing and teaching your music.  There’s our Virtual Workshops, Jukebox, Listening Library, Digital Delivery and, of course, there’s an app for us too-we’re on The App Store and Google Plus.

For more details, questions or to introduce yourself, visit us online at www.stantons.com, or give us a call at 1-800-42-MUSIC!

Previous posts in this series:  10% Educational Discount; Knowledgeable Staff; 21 Day Trial

2015 OMEA Concert Band Lists Announced 28 June, 2014

Last week (June 19-20) the OMEA Concert Band Committee met to choose music for the 2015 Required Music Lists. For band directors who like to plan ahead (and those who have called to see when the list would be ready) you can now preview the 2015 Junior High and High School contest lists at stantons.com*, and in the Stanton’s Listening Library.

For High School, the lists have expanded from 12 to 18 titles. There are now 6 Standard Repertoire pieces on the list that will remain unchanged from year-to-year in addition to the dozen contemporary/new selections. The Standard Repertoire lists are as follows:

OMEA HS Class AA: Armenian Dances, Part 1 – Alfred Reed; Chester – William Schuman; Four Scottish Dances – Malcolm Arnold/arr. John Paynter; Incantation and Dance – John Barnes Chance; Lincholnshire Posy – Percy Grainger/arr. Frederick Fennell (any 4 mvts. including either mvt. 3 or 5); Suite of Old American Dances – Robert Russell Bennett (any 4 mvts.).

OMEA HS Class A: English Folk Song Suite – Ralph Vaughan Williams; Festival Prelude – Alfred Reed; First Suite in Eb – Gustav Holst/ed. Colin Matthews; Prelude, Siciliano and Rondo – Malcolm Arnold/arr. John Paynter; Satiric Dances – Norman Dello Joio; Variations on a Korean Folk Song – John Barnes Chance.

OMEA HS Class B: Cajun Folk Songs – Frank Ticheli; Chant & Jubilo – W. Francis McBeth; Emperata Overture – Claude T. Smith; Irish Rhapsody – Claire Grundman; The Light Eternal – James Swearingen; Toccata for Band – Frank Erickson

OMEA HS Class C: Canto – W. Francis McBeth; Declaration Overture – Claude T. Smith; Kentucky 1800 – Claire Grundman; Nathan Hale Trilogy – James Curnow; Overture for Winds – Charles Carter; Three Ayres from Gloucester – Hugh M. Stuart

The Junior High/Middle School lists are the usual mix of young band standards and contemporary pieces. Junior High Class A has expanded to 28 titles with Classes B & C at 30.  Be sure to utilize stantons.com to preview these titles, make playlists of those you’re considering using Stanton’s Jukebox feature, and, of course, we will have all of these titles and scores available for purchase.

*OMEA HS Class B title Visionaries is only available directly through the composer’s website. We are sorry that Stanton’s is unable to provide preview material or carry this title.

The Stanton’s Difference: 21 Day Trial 23 June, 2014

At Stanton’s, we know you have many choices when it comes to purchasing sheet music.  Over the next few weeks, we want to take the opportunity to highlight just a few of the many reasons why Stanton’s is the best place to buy music for your school, church, private studio or personal use!

Stanton’s is one of the largest sheet music retailers in the country, with tens of thousands of titles in stock.  We understand that many of our customers can’t make it to our Columbus, Ohio location to peruse music, so we offer a 21 Day Trial service.

How It Works-Music can be secured with either a Stanton’s account or a credit card.  We send you the in-stock materials you request,  and you pay nothing but the shipping and handling costs.  As long as the music is returned to us in NEW condition within 21 days, you are never charged.  If you have specific titles you’d like to see, we will happily send those to you, or you can ask one of our knowledgeable staff members to select pieces for you based on concert theme, performance venue, type of group, etc.

What You Can Take On Trial (by department):

Choral, Handbell, Classroom General Music & Solo Vocal-You may take up to 20 single copies of octavos and/or up to 5 musicals, collections, or director’s scores.

Band, Orchestra and Instrumental-You may take up to six items on trial, including full arrangements, solos and chamber ensembles.  (Only scores will be sent for titles appearing on the OMEA High School Large Group Contest List.)

Piano/Keyboard-Up to five collections and/or 10 teaching pieces, one copy each.  Popular sheet music is not available for 21 Day Trial.  75% (by dollar amount) of the piano music on trial must be purchased.

For more details about our 21 Day Trial, visit us online at www.stantons.com, or give us a call at 1-800-42-MUSIC!

Previous posts in this series:  10% Educational Discount; Knowledgeable Staff

Band Directors Teaching Choir-Help! I’m not a pianist! 17 June, 2014

Here at Stanton’s12VBF_ConspirareHandel, we’re aware of the rising number of music teachers working outside of their specialty.  Cutbacks have forced many instrumental specialists to begin teaching choir-but never fear!  In this series, we will try to give some advice on where to start, as well as recommending some “tried and true” products that will help you become a great choral educator!

Wishing you had paid more attention during class piano in college?  Or cursing your mom for letting you quit going to lessons so you could play Little League?  You’re not alone!  True, some choral directors are accomplished pianists, but many are not.  Here are some tips if you find your skills aren’t up to par:

Accompaniment CD’s-While a live accompanist is always best, there are accompaniment CD’s for much of the school choral literature.  The CD will generally include 2 tracks, one with a full performance and one with just the accompaniment.  How can you tell if a piece has an accompaniment track available?  It’s usually printed on the first page of the octavo, or you can always check our website.

Sing Along Tracks-Some publishers (most prominently Carl Fisher and BriLee,) offer free, online resources for learning their music, including recordings of the piano accompaniments and even individual parts.  If you can only play one part at a time, hook your computer up to the classroom stereo and have it play another part so you can rehearse two at a time.

A Cappella Literature-Maybe you are up to learning one or two accompaniments but not a whole concert’s worth, so consider an a cappella selection.  It’s not as scary as you think!  A cappella pieces are available at all difficulty levels and voicings, and force your students to work on intonation, tone, balance and blend.  If you doubt your students abilities in this area, start out with one voicing below what they usually sing:  If you usually sing SATB, try a 3 part selection; if you usually sing 3 parts, use a round or partner song to practice this skill.

Don’t be shy about asking for help, especially if you are new to the choral world.  As always, the experienced choral directors at Stanton’s are thrilled to help you select materials, make recommendations or give advice.    Contact us at 1-800-42-MUSIC, extension 1 or visit our store.  We look forward to seeing you soon!

Previous posts in this series: Warm-Ups and Rounds; Sight-Singing; SAB or 3 Part Mixed

The Stanton’s Difference: Knowledgeable Staff 16 June, 2014

At Stanton’s, we know you have many choices when it comes to purchasing sheet music.  Over the next few weeks, we want to take the opportunity to highlight just a few of the many reasons why Stanton’s is the best place to buy music for your school, church, private studio or personal use!

Every teacher has experienced the frustration of trying to explain something musical to a non-musician.  Rest assured, that will never happen when you call Stanton’s!  All of our sales staff are college graduates with music degrees, many of whom have years of teaching experience in the classroom and/or private studio.

Want to know what key a piece is in?  The range of a trumpet part?  How difficult a piano solo is?  We will be happy to pull in-stock products for you or research to find an answer.

Our staff also spends hundreds of hours each year listening to all the new releases from countless different publishers.  We select the best of each catalog to become Stanton’s “Top Choices.”  Different from publishers interested in promoting certain products or composers, we make our selections with YOU in mind.  Our staff chooses quality literature to help you make the most of your teaching time and your budget dollars.

Like you, we enjoy flexing our “musical muscles.”  If you have a tricky question, call or email us with your specific needs.  Because we see so many products each year, we are able to suggest resources for almost any teacher, no matter how unusual the request.

To talk with one of the friendly members of our staff, visit us online at www.stantons.com, or give us a call at 1-800-42-MUSIC!

Previous posts in this series:  10% Educational Discount

The Stanton’s Difference: 10% Educational Discount 09 June, 2014

At Stanton’s, we know you have many choices when it comes to purchasing sheet music.  Over the next few weeks, we want to take the opportunity to highlight just a few of the many reasons why Stanton’s is the best place to buy music for your school, church, private studio or personal use!

Did you know that Stanton’s offers a 10% discount on most printed sheet music products to teachers, church musicians and college music majors?  You can use your discount when shopping online, over the phone, or in the store.  Your discount is automatically applied when you use your church or school account ( We’ll tell you more about accounts in a few weeks,) or just mention that you are a teacher when you call to place an order!

10% doesn’t sound like very much?  Think of it this way:  For choral directors, it’s the same as buying 9 copies of an octavo and getting the 10th copy FREE! Or let’s say that you’re an instrumental teacher with 3 groups.  If you buy 3 pieces for each group over the course of the year, that “fun” pop number for the spring concert is like a freebie!  And who doesn’t love FREE?

For more information about the educational discount, visit us online at www.stantons.com, or give us a call at 1-800-42-MUSIC!

 

Band Directors Teaching Choir: SAB or 3 Part Mixed? 02 June, 2014

Here at Stanton’s12VBF_ConspirareHandel, we’re aware of the rising number of music teachers working outside of their specialty.  Cutbacks have forced many instrumental specialists to begin teaching choir-but never fear!  In this series, we will try to give some advice on where to start, as well as recommending some “tried and true” products that will help you become a great choral educator!

Most musicians, no matter their focus, are familiar with the traditional SATB voicing for groups of mixed gender.  If you are new to choir, however, you may not be familiar with the designations SAB and 3-Part Mixed.  While many publishers group these voicings together, they are not the same.  It is important to know the difference so that you can pick music best suited to your students’ needs.

3 Part Mixed music is usually intended for choirs with boys who are just beginning a voice change.  The boys part is notated in the bass clef, but the range is generally from about F below middle C to E above middle C.  The tessitura of the music is generally higher.  This can sometimes make it uncomfortable for students who have a developed lower range or are experiencing a voice change that has eliminated their mid-range.

SAB arrangements are intended for groups with men whose voices have settled into a lower, more mature register.  The range of SAB music is lower, usually spanning from the C below middle C to middle C, and the tessitura is lower.  This music is intended for adult/upper grade male singers or male singers who have temporarily lost their mid-range due to their voice change.  This music can be difficult for students whose voices have not yet changed or are just beginning to change.

Don’t be shy about asking for help, especially if you are new to the choral world.  As always, the experienced choral directors at Stanton’s are thrilled to help you select materials, make recommendations or give advice.    Contact us at 1-800-42-MUSIC, extension 1 or visit our store.  We look forward to seeing you soon!

Previous posts in this series: Warm-Ups and Rounds; Sight-Singing

Need To Organize Your Music Library? 22 May, 2014

disorganizedIs your music library a mess? Are your arrangements getting tattered, torn, dog-eared, etc.? Let Stanton’s Sheet Music help you get your music library organized with File Finder music file boxes and Musi-Dex Filing System filing envelopes.

 

       
Concert Size                9 1/2″ x 12 5/8”
Available in 5/8” (#60-1), 1” (#60-2), and 1 1/2″ (#60-3) depths.

Marching Band            5 3/4″ x 7 1/4″
Available in 1” (#40-2) and 1 1/2″ (#40-3) depths.

Octavo Size                 8 1/2″ x 11″
Available in 1″ (#80-1), 2″ (#80-2), and 3″ (80-3) depths.

 

 

Musi-Dex Filing System Envelopes                .35 each
Concert Size (F11)       11” x 14 1/2″               03770989
Marching Band (F9)     6 1/2” x 9”                    03771063
Octavo Size (F12)        9″ x 12 1/4″                 03770990

Band Directors Teaching Choir: Sight-Singing 19 May, 2014

Here at Stanton’s12VBF_ConspirareHandel, we’re aware of the rising number of music teachers working outside of their specialty.  Cutbacks have forced many instrumental specialists to begin teaching choir-but never fear!  In this series, we will try to give some advice on where to start, as well as recommending some “tried and true” products that will help you become a great choral educator!

Many teachers new to choral education are surprised to discover the lack of a method book for choir like those in the band and orchestra world.  While some of these texts do exist, most choral directors prefer to use a sight-singing method as a basis for teaching music literacy and basic skills.  Whether your students have previous training in Orff, Kodaly, another method, or no training at all, these sight-singing texts are adaptable to a variety of situations:

Sing On Sight-By Audrey Snyder-Available in 3 part mixed (for girls and changing-voice boys,) or 2 part treble (for unchanged voices,) Volume One, Volume Two and accompaniment CD’sGreat for the educator teaching sight-singing for the first time!

Essential Sight-Singing-By Emily Crocker and John Leavitt-Available for Treble Voices, Bass Voices or Mixed Voices; Volume One, Volume Two and Accompaniment CD’s.

 

Kinesthetic (as well as visual and aural) learners will benefit from the Kodaly-Curwen hand signs  while sight-singing.  Having students show these hand signs while they or others are singing is a great way to instantly assess student progress or have one part practice while another part sings.  Try these posters for learning these simple but effective signs:

Kodaly Hand Signs-(Set of 8 Posters)-Hal Leonard#09970613-$7.99

Don’t be shy about asking for help, especially if you are new to the choral world.  As always, the experienced choral directors at Stanton’s are thrilled to help you select materials, make recommendations or give advice.    Contact us at 1-800-42-MUSIC, extension 1 or visit our store.  We look forward to seeing you soon!

Previous posts in this series: Warm-Ups and Rounds

Have You Ordered Your Copy of Fanfare and Processional Yet? 12 May, 2014

Is your set missing too many parts to be usable, or are your students having trouble with the hard-to-read photocopies of photocopies that have long since replaced your originals? Each year Stanton’s stocks multiples of James D. Ployhar’s graduation standard Fanfare and Processional/Fanfare and Recessional knowing that band directors around the country will be replacing their worn out, half lost arrangements. Is this the year to replace your copy? Order your new set today!


Fanfare and Processional/Fanfare and Recessional
Edward Elgar/arr. James D. Ployhar
Grade 3                        $65.00
THE standard for over 40 years! Featuring Elgar’s Pomp and Circumstance, as well as original fanfares and a recessional by James D. Ployhar, this arrangement is a staple of high school band libraries across the country.


Looking for an alternative?

Academic Processional & Recessional
arr. Robert W. Smith & Ed Huckeby
Grade 3                        $72.00
At last, a fresh and welcome new treatment of the ceremonial “must-haves” – Pomp and Circumstance and Sine Nomine – for the Grade 3 level! Skillfully scored for success even with limited instrumentation, they nevertheless sound full and solid, with some inspired creative touches.

Band Directors Teaching Choir: Warm-Ups and Rounds 08 May, 2014

Here at Stanton’s12VBF_ConspirareHandel, we’re aware of the rising number of music teachers working outside of their specialty.  Cutbacks have forced many instrumental specialists to begin teaching choir-but never fear!  In this series, we will try to give some advice on where to start, as well as recommending some “tried and true” products that will help you become a great choral educator!

Warm-Ups-Much like instrumental warm-ups, choral warm-ups are essential for both mental and physical preparedness.  You don’t have to be an accomplished pianist to warm-up your choirs!  After teaching the warm-up in a comfortable key, you can give the only the first pitch in each successive key.  At a loss for what warm-ups to do?  Every choral director should have at least one of these standard collections on their piano:

The Complete Choral Warm-Up Book-Russell Robinson & Jay Althouse; Alfred Publishing #11653 $23.99

The Choral Warm-Up Collection-Edited by Sally K. Albrecht; Alfred Publishing #21676  $24.99

Rounds-They’re not just for elementary school!  Choirs of all levels can benefit from working on rounds.  In addition to being one of the simplest forms of part singing, rounds are great for working on balance, blend, facial expression, diction and much more.   Students will  be thrilled with the full, lush sound that is produced when a round really comes together.  Make one or more rounds from these collections part of your daily classroom routine:

150 Rounds for Singing & Teaching by E. Bolkovac and J. Johnson; Boosey & Hawkes #48007805 $18.99

Round the World by Cheryl Lavender; Hal Leonard #09971739 $19.99

Don’t be shy about asking for help, especially if you are new to the choral world.  As always, the experienced choral directors at Stanton’s are thrilled to help you select materials, make recommendations or give advice.    Contact us at 1-800-42-MUSIC, extension 1 or visit our store.  We look forward to seeing you soon!

 

 

 

Fun New Disney Titles for Band 29 April, 2014

In addition to arrangements from Frozen, there are a few other new Disney arrangements for band this year.  From the popular animated movie Planes is an arrangement by Michael Brown highlighting the orchestral score, and two new arrangements for young bands featuring music from Disney park attractions – Grim Grinning Ghosts from The Haunted Mansion (this arrangement is spot-on), and One Little Spark from Journey into Imagination at EPCOT.  These will be fun additions to your spring concert, especially for any students that have been to the Disney parks!

Grim Grinning Ghosts
arr. Douglas E. Wagner
Grade 2
Featuring graveyard wailings and clattering bones, this spooky musical adventure is a delight to play and frightful to listen to. This theme from the The Haunted Mansion attraction at both Disneyland and the Magic Kingdom Park at Walt Disney World will chill the spines of all within earshot.

One Little Spark
arr. Douglas E. Wagner
Grade 1
Journey into Imagination with Figment, the adorable and oftentimes mischievous purple dragon, is a ride exploring the 5 senses in the Imagination! pavilion at Disney’s EPCOT theme park in Orlando, Florida. Riders are accompanied by the verses of One Little Spark, one of the many amazing musical collaborations of the Sherman brothers.

Highlights from Planes
arr. Michael Brown
Grade 3
For the Disney animated film Planes, composer Mark Mancina created an outstanding orchestral score filled with power and depth. Michael Brown’s skillful adaptation for young band brings all the majestic qualities of the original to the concert stage.

New Star-Spangled Titles for Band 23 April, 2014

Finding unique patriotic selections can be a challenge, but there is a wealth of new pieces for both young band and high school this year.  Ranging from typical fare (America, the Beautiful & The Star-Spangled Banner), to salutes to history (The Gettysburg Address; A House Divided; Last Full Measure); honoring the fallen (A Celebration of Taps; Ask Not; Arlington), and salutes to everyday heroes (Call to the Heroes); patriotic flag-wavers (Banners on Parade), and wonderful originals (Always United, Forever Strong & Legacy of Honor), there is something new to fill every patriotic programming slot.  All of these selections come highly recommended by our band staff, are great choices for patriotic concerts and civic events, and will make great additions to your library.

New Patriotic Titles for Young Band

America, the Beautiful 
arr. Dragon/Wagner
Grade 2
Long-established as THE setting of America, the Beautiful, the majestic beauty and awesome grandeur of Carmen Dragon’s arrangement has been preserved in this gorgeous edition with accommodations made for younger, less experienced groups. This edition is a must-have addition to your library that your students and audience deserve to experience!

Call to the Heroes
Chris M. Bernotas
Grade 1.5
This piece was inspired by the 10th anniversary of 9/11 and the heroic acts of the first responders. Heroes surround us in life; this piece pays tribute to our everyday heroes, such as our parents, teachers, and peers.

A Celebration of Taps 
arr. Jerry Brubaker
Grade 2
Intertwining a harmonic component and featuring contrapuntal textures, this moving and mysterious work was inspired by a performance of Taps witnessed by the arranger in Arlington National Cemetery celebration the 150th anniversary of the hallowed melody with 150 buglers positioned throughout the twelve acre grounds.

The Gettysburg Address
Michael Story
Grade 1
To be performed with or without a narrator, this work contains musical fragments from three civil war songs, including the Battle Cry of Freedom, Dixie, and Battle Hymn of the Republic. Scored for beginners, the use of the narration will certainly enhance this patriotic setting.

A House Divided        
Brian Balmages
Grade 2.5
Based on Abraham Lincoln’s famous speech in 1858 about slavery, this contemplative work weaves original material with America to depict the tension in the House of Representatives. Often, the melody to America is altered melodically and harmonically as moments of anger, rage and fear dissolve into quirky moments of patriotism. The end of the work is magical, as the words let freedom ring are sung by the ensemble to leave the audience speechless.

Last Full Measure
Michael Sweeney
Grade 2.5
In honor of the 150th anniversary of the Battle of Gettysburg, Michael Sweeney has created an imaginative medley of Civil War tunes well-suited for young bands. The Girl I Left Behind Me (with optional tin whistles), When Johnny Comes Marching Home, and Johnny Has Gone for a Soldier express longing and hope for loved ones away, while Battle Cry of Freedom and Battle Hymn of the Republic inspire feelings of patriotic resolve and courage.

Yankee Fanfare
Travis J. Weller
Grade 2.5
Imaginative, crisp scoring and a constant rhythmic drive energetically propel this fresh new take on Yankee Doodle from start to finish. Originally used by British Soldiers to mock the American Colonists during the Revolutionary War, the Colonists used Yankee Doodle as a rallying song when the tide of war turned in their direction. Your students should rally around this stirring, very fun setting featuring mixed meters and engaging parts for all instruments, which could be used as an attention-getting opener or bring down the house closer!

                                                                                                                                                

New Patriotic Titles for Concert Band

Always United, Forever Strong
Brian Balmages
Grade 4
This dynamic concert opener reflects on the power of a community coming together to be greater than the sum of its individual members. A single note fanfare progressively builds and blossoms into a massive declaration of power and might. Glorious and resolute, this is a perfect programming alternative to the standard patriotic fare.

America, the Beautiful 
arr. Erik Morales
Grade 3
This thoughtful, yet powerful arrangement brings a distinct patriotic element to your program with a focus on harmonic beauty and ensemble sound. Melodies linger at times, then push forward as the music reaches a stunning climax full of polychords and a breathtaking ending.

Arlington (Where Giants Lie Sleeping) 
Paul Murtha
Grade 4
Composed as a tribute to generations of American servicemen and women buried at Arlington National Cemetery near Washington, D.C., this powerful and emotional work is a fitting addition to any memorial occasion or concert. Offstage trumpets announce the opening theme following by reverent strains and a solemn statement of My Country, ‘Tis of Thee. The piece develops and builds gradually, reaching a heroic climax with the familiar hymn God of Our Fathers before returning to a quiet and reflective mood as the offstage trumpets return.

Ask Not: A Musical Tribute to JFK
James Swearingen
Grade 3
A glimpse of American history is unveiled in this stunning work that musically reflects the life and times of our 35th President, John Fitzgerald Kennedy. Through the use of a narrator, a wealth of information is provided that the audience will find fascinating and informative, bringing music and history together to create an educational and inspirational event.

Banners on Parade
arr. Stephen Bulla
Grade 3
Perfect for any patriotic event or showing pride in the national colors at any time, here is a rousing and creative arrangement of familiar flag-wavers! Stephen Bulla opens with You’re a Grand Old Flag, followed by the “hurrah for the flag of the free” trio section of Stars and Stripes Forever, and finishes with a toe-tapping rendition of Yankee Doodle Boy.

Legacy of Honor
Jay Bocook
Grade 4
This impressive work from Jay Bocook opens with a reverent and lush chorale segment interspersed with brief solos for oboe, flute, trumpet, and bassoon. The pace quickens with a grand heroic theme which evolves and intensifies into a majestic climax. The mood calms as this beautifully orchestrated and rewarding piece closes in a quiet and delicate manner.

The Star-Spangled Banner
arr. Damrosch/Sousa
Grade 4
This is the first concert-sized publication of the superb Sousa-Damrosch Star Spangled Banner. Their Ab version remains one of the most standard and sing-able arrangements of our National Anthem. It was richly harmonized in 1917 by Walter Damrosch and skillfully arranged by John Philip Sousa. This arrangement has been carefully editied by Keith Brion, and includes fascinating historical background.